Trinity Western University

Course Descriptions

Geography

    NB: Only GEOG 121, 131; 220; 320, 321, and 322 fulfil academic core's natural science course requirements. (Only GEOG 121 fulfils the academic core's natural science lab course requirements.)


  • GEOG 111 Human Geography and Global Change (3 sem. hrs.)

    An introduction to human geography and the notion of globalization by exploring some of the major economic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and technological changes that have recently occurred at the global level and are shaping local places. The course is designed to provide students with better understanding of the variation, interaction, and interdependence of places, regions, people and their environments in a globalizing world; and to demonstrate how human geographers might consider and examine the concepts, forces, processes, issues, and ideas that are associated with global transformation.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 121 Earth and Atmospheric Science (3 sem. hrs.)

    An introduction to the fundamental concepts and systems of earth and atmospheric science from a geographic perspective. Emphasis is placed on the origins and development of Earth's surface features; the characteristics and circulations of the atmosphere, including weather and global climates; and the biophysical principles governing vegetation on Earth.

    NB: Fulfils academic core laboratory science requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (3-3; 3-3)


  • GEOG 131 Global Environmental Issues (3 sem. hrs.)

    An investigation of the scientific principles behind global environmental issues. The course focuses on key ecological concepts and the changing relationship of humans with the natural world; including the different approaches to understanding and solving environmental problems, from local to global scales. It investigates such issues as human populations and environmental impact; loss of species biodiversity; air, water, and soil pollution; energy use; climate change; and waste management.

    NB: Fulfils academic core natural science requirements.

    Cross-listed: ENVS 131.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 3-0


  • GEOG 212 Urbanization Issues of Developing Countries (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course explores urbanization processes in developing countries, particularly in urban settings across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It provides a geographic perspective on the socio-economic, political, cultural, and environmental conditions under which cities of the Third World are rapidly growing and their relation to globalization issues. Case studies from selected areas examine such problems as unemployment, inadequate health services, housing shortages, and inadequate urban infrastructure.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 220 Geology of the Vancouver Region (3 sem. hrs.)

    An overview of the fundamental earth science processes responsible for the creation, transformation, and ongoing physical development of the Pacific Northwest. These processes are studied in the context of the building of the North American continent through tectonic forces and surface dynamics. Topics include geologic time, tectonics, vulcanology, seismology, stratigraphy, glaciation, erosion, paleontology, paleoclimatology, and environmental issues. Field trips and field studies are included.

    NB: Fulfils academic core natural science requirements.

    Cross-listed: GEOL 220.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 230 Geography of Canada (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course describes and explores Canada's physical and human geography focusing on the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and cultural change. It emphasizes the diversity and interrelationships between the physical and human landscapes which have evolved over time creating the identifiable regions and sub-regions within the country.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 282 Geographic Information Systems (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course introduces the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It focuses on the theory and practice of GIS including how to store, analyze and display geographic information; how to use GIS as tool in the social and environmental sciences; and the development of skills in the operation of GIS software.

    Cross-listed: ISYS 390.

    Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-2)


  • GEOG 312 Historical Geography of Canada (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course explores the changing geographical patterns of transportation and communication, settlement and economic activity, and social and cultural change since the beginning of European contact. Topics include the role of the physical environment in shaping regional identities; pre-industrial cities and economic activities; urban and economic growth during industrialization; and the changing social geography of the country. Field trips are required.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 212, 131, or 230 or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 320 Geomorphology (3 sem. hrs.)

    A scientific examination of the physical processes which shape landform development, structure, and dynamics. Topics include weathering, slope systems, fluvial and coastal environments, and glacial and periglacial systems. Special emphasis is placed on deciphering past events from current landscape structures. Field trips and field studies are required.

    NB: Offered every other year. Fulfils academic core natural science requirements.

    Cross-listed: GEOL 320.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent. (3-2; 0-0)


  • GEOG 321 Geography of Soils (3 sem. hrs.)

    A scientific investigation of the various aspects of soil as a natural resource. Topics include physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soils applied in the context of soil formation, soil classification and land use, agriculture, and environmental engineering. Soil mapping and spatial distribution of soils is also considered. Field trips and field studies are required.

    NB: Offered every other year. Fulfils academic core natural science requirements.

    Cross-listed: GEOL 310.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent. (3-3; 0-0)


  • GEOG 322 Global Climate Change (3 sem. hrs.)

    A scientific examination of the systems and processes which govern natural and human-induced climate change. Topics include atmospheric composition, structure, and function; climate change over tectonic, orbital, deglacial and historical timescales; climate modeling; climate change impacts on terrestrial and marine ecosystems; and the political and socio-economic dimensions of climate change. Field trips are required.

    NB: Offered every other year. Fulfils academic core natural science requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 332 Geography of Western Canada (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course provides an overview of the physical and human geography that shapes and defines the prairie provinces and British Columbia. The course focuses on selected cultural and environmental factors in understanding the spatial variation in population patterns and economic activity. Emphasis is also placed on the role of regional literature and painting in the formation of regional images.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 341 Resource and Environmental Management (3 sem. hrs.)

    An introduction to key concepts and issues in natural resources management. The course examines major resource-based industries, including agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, energy, and recreation. It also emphasizes understanding the varied influences that environmental, socio-economic, and political factors have on the spatial distribution of resource utilization and resource management.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Cross-listed: ECON 341.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent.(3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 343 Geography of the Pacific Rim (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course examines the physical and human geography of the Pacific Rim. It gives particular attention to regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, as well as globalization and its impact on this region. The Pacific Rim is a geographic realm that has changed dramatically since the middle of the 20th century, therefore, this course explores the dynamic issues, problems, and challenges facing contemporary Pacific Rim countries, how the issues are being addressed, and the future prospects for the people and countries within this region.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent.(3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 344 Geography of Africa (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course examines the human and physical geography of Africa. Attention is given to the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and globalization and its impact on this vast continent. Africa is a geographic realm that has changed dramatically since the middle of the 20th century; therefore, this course explores the dynamic issues, problems and challenges facing contemporary African societies, how the issues are being addressed, and the future prospects for the people and countries within this particular geographic region.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent.(3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 354 Geography of the World Economy (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course investigates the changing geographical patterns of global economic activity and the processes influencing the organization of economic space. It focuses on the spatial patterns of production and manufacturing; the distribution of goods and services; and the role of multinationals, global marketing strategies and outsourcing. It also investigates issues and challenges from global to local economies; including population growth and development, poverty and unemployment, and environmental sustainability.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Cross-listed: ECON 350.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 355 Geography of Urban Areas (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course focuses on the origin, physical environment, and structure of urban settlements; the growth and processes of urbanization; and the impact of globalization on urban centres. It investigates societal issues common to urban environments including; poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, criminality, environmental degradation and deterioration of the built environment. It also provides an overview of urban renewal and planning processes.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 356 Urban and Regional Planning (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the principles, problems, and techniques of urban, suburban, rural, and regional land use planning. It focuses on the elements and make-up of the comprehensive plan, the politics of planning, and the assessment of economic, social and environmental plans.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including one of GEOG 111; 212; 355 or instructor's consent. 1(0-0; 3-0)


  • GEOG 382 Applied Geographic Information Systems (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course focuses on the utility of Geographic Information Systems in problem solving and decision-making in real world settings. Students will be expected to carry out a major term project in consultation with the instructor.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography including GEOG 282, or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-2)


  • GEOG 383 Geographic Data Analysis (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course focuses on the use of quantitative methods as an aid to problem-solving in the geographical and environmental sciences. Topics include sampling and data collection; methods of statistical description; and methods of statistical inference and hypothesis testing.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography. (0-0; 3-2)


  • GEOG 391, 392 Directed Studies in Geography (3 sem. hrs.)

    In special cases, with the instructor's consent, students may pursue an independent but guided reading and research course in a specialized area of Geography of interest to students.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography, and instructor's consent. See Geography Coordinator. (3-0 or 3-0)


  • GEOG 400 Special Topics in Geography (3 sem. hrs.)

    A study of special topics or issues in Geography that are not considered in depth in other courses.

    NB: Not offered every year. See Geography Coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): Not offered every year. See Geography Coordinator.


  • GEOG 411 Rural Development (3 sem. hrs)

    The course is designed to introduce students to the broad concept of rural development, to the relationship between rural communities and their environments, and to the critical issues of rural restructuring and sustainability. This course examines the theoretical underpinnings, principles, and practices of rural development as well as the problems and challenges facing rural communities in both developed and developing countries. It is expected that, by the end of the course, students will gain and/or broaden their knowledge of contemporary domestic and international rural development processes, practices, and issues.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography, third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (0-0;3-0)


  • GEOG 442 Environmental Thought (3 sem. hrs.)

    A survey of the origin and development of those streams of geographic thought reflecting people's relationship to the natural environment. The course includes discussions within the context of Christian and non-Christian alternatives, of the development of a responsible Christian environmental ethic and its application to global environmental issues.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Cross-listed: ENVS 442.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography, third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)


  • GEOG 441 Resource Management in British Columbia (3 sem. hrs)

    This course offers a detailed examination of natural resource management issues in British Columbia. It asks participants to consider selected B.C. environmental issues in a broad context by posing a number of questions: What do we mean when we use the term environment? What is problematic? To whom? What is the response? How do we apply what we learn within the context of sustainability and stewardship of Creation? Course themes such as the case of Pacific salmon within the Fraser River Watershed will be utilized.

    NB: Offered every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Geography, third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)

back to top

This page contains official TWU academic program information.