Trinity Western University

Course Descriptions

Nursing, Graduate Courses

    NB: The following courses are part of the Master of Science in Nursing Graduate Program. For further information about courses see the School of Graduate Studies section or contact the M.S.N. Graduate Program director.

  • Core Courses

    NURS 510 Foundations of Nursing Knowledge (3 sem. hrs.)

    An exploration of the historical and current trends in nursing theory and philosophy. Students explore the role of models, meta-paradigms, concept analyses and middle range theories in relation to traditional and emerging views of science. Issues and controversies within nursing philosophy are introduced with emphasis on understanding the relevance of these debates for both the health care system and the discipline of nursing.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate nursing research course or equivalent. Summer.


  • NURS 520 Knowledge Synthesis (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course addresses the principles of knowledge synthesis as the basis for informing nursing theory and practice. Students broaden their understanding of different kinds of evidence while learning the skills of locating, coding, synthesizing, and applying evidence from research studies. Students learn to draw on Christian values and principles to critically reflect on the implications of evidence-based knowledge for theory and practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate nursing research course (or equivalent). Summer.


  • NURS 530 Nursing Inquiry I (3 sem. hrs.)

    An entry level course in understanding the philosophical foundations of nursing inquiry and evidence with a focus on qualitative methods. Students explore the inquiry process in the context of the following methods: phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, critical inquiry, narrative analysis, historical and philosophic inquiry. The processes of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are examined. Attention is given to Christian values and principles in relation to research ethics and the applicability of research findings to the various contexts of nursing practice.

    Prerequisite(s): NURS 510, 520. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 540 Nursing Inquiry II (3 sem. hrs.)

    A graduate course that addresses the philosophical foundations of nursing inquiry and evidence with a focus on quantitative methods. Students broaden their understanding of quantitative research designs and learn to interpret statistical results for answering research questions that are of relevance to nursing theory and practice. Attention is given to Christian values and principles in relation to research ethics and the applicability of research findings to the various contexts of nursing practice.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate nursing research course (or equivalent); introductory course on statistics; first-year M.S.N. courses as designated on curricular plan. (0-0; 3-0)


  • NURS 550 Health Care Policy (3 sem. hrs.)

    A broad overview of the policy process and its application to health care. Reflecting on Canadian priorities, concerns, and obligations, health care issues are analyzed with a specific focus on policy, politics and influence. The roles of nursing and nurse leaders in health policy development, implementation, and advocacy for the health and social needs of the public are critically evaluated. A required on-site residency at the Laurentian Leadership Centre in Ottawa exposes students to the key people and process of health care policy at federal and international levels. International policy, through WHO and other agencies, is examined for its relationship to federal policy and for global perspectives on health and nursing.

    Prerequisite(s): NURS 510. (0-0; 3-0)


  • NURS 607 Nursing Topics (3 sem. hrs.)

    This graduate course critically examines issues related to nursing knowledge and advanced professional practice. Topics may vary, depending on student interest and professor availability. Example topics include: Issues in Nursing History and Issues in International Nursing.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for admission to Master of Science in Nursing program.


  • NURS 631 ANP I Perspectives on Advanced Nursing Practice (Gerontology) (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course presents an overview of advanced nursing practice in Canada and the international community, with a population focus of gerontology. Starting with an exploration of the evolution of advanced nursing practice, the course examines professional and socio-political contexts of care and delivery, leading to a study of current and future issues affecting advanced nursing practice. The interrelated roles of advanced nursing practice—clinician, consultant, educator, researcher, and leader—frame our discussion. A clinical project is central to the course and students will require access to a gerontology practice site.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year MSN core courses


  • NURS 632 ANP II Themes in Care (Gerontology) (3 sem. hrs.)

    Building on ANP I (Gerontology), this course focuses on applying advanced nursing practice competencies (practice, education, collaboration/consultation, research, leadership) to the spectrum of health and illness from a positive again perspective. Themes in care frame our discussion of health and illness patterns: health promotion, risk mitigation, illness management, and disease prevention. Discussions include consideration of vulnerable populations for care coordination by the advanced practice nurse within specific context of care delivery. A clinical project is central to the course and students will require access to a gerontology practice site.

    Prerequisite(s): NURS 631


  • NURS 633 Ethics and Decision Making in Health Care (3 sem. hrs.)

    This course provides students with a solid framework for addressing ethical issues and ethical decision making. Through a contextualized approach that draws on a variety of ethical theories, learners in this course critically analyze a range of issues facing leaders in health care settings, including micro or individual level decisions (e.g., treatment withdrawal) to meso or organizational level questions (e.g., resource allocation pertaining to organ donation or restructuring decisions), to macro or social level issues (e.g., public health policy that focuses on prevention rather than treatment, or the challenge of conflicting worldviews in a pluralistic society). Exploration of moral leadership and the processes of ethical decision-making includes Christian principles, personal values and professional obligations. Resources such as the profession's code of ethics and moral policy-making statements are utilized in addition to ethical theories.

    Prerequisite(s): NURS 510.

    Cross-listed: LDRS 633. (3-0; 0-0)


  • Electives

    NURS 611 Perspectives on Nursing Education (3 sem. hrs.)

    An overview to the history, theory, research, ethics, and issues shaping nursing leadership in Canada and international health communities. Utilizing thoughtful Christian perspectives, students critically explore the history of leadership in health care, and the sociopolitical context in which it operates, and the attributes of morally good leaders, analyze current and future issues affecting health care leadership, and apply the role of nursing leadership to that context.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 612 Learning/Teaching in Nurse Education (3 sem. hrs.)

    A practical focus on the competencies required to facilitate learning in nursing education. Students explore pedagogical concepts and techniques in classroom and clinical contexts including constructing syllabi, lesson plans, clinical learning experiences and evaluative measures, with attention to Christian perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan; NURS 611. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 621 Perspectives on Nursing Leadership (3 sem. hrs.)

    An overview to the theory, research, and issues shaping nursing leadership in Canada and international health communities. Students will explore the history of leadership in health care, and the sociopolitical context in which it operates; analyze current and future issues affecting health care leadership, and apply the role of nursing leadership to that context. Nurses bringing disciplinary nursing knowledge about health promotion, patient responses to illness, interpersonal and interprofessional communication, population health and the social contexts of health and illness together with emerging knowledge regarding health care organizations and leadership theory are in a unique position to provide highly effective leadership to today's changing, complex health care environments.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 622 The Skills of Nursing Leadership (3 sem. hrs.)

    A practical focus on the competencies required for nursing leadership. Students have the opportunity to develop leadership skills necessary for today's complex health care environments that take into account Christian values and principles. Building on their existing practice expertise, students explore ways to innovatively incorporate emerging research, theory and practice concepts into a particular field of health care leadership practice, including (but not limited to) health care administration and operational management. Emphasis is placed on concepts such as values clarification, engagement and relationship building, patient advocacy, interprofessional communication and team-building, quality improvement, and the ethics of leadership.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan; NURS 621. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 631 Advanced Practice I: Perspectives on Advanced Nursing Practice (3 sem. hrs.)

    An overview to the history, research, ethics, and issues affecting advanced nursing practice in Canada and internationally. Attention is paid to Christian values and principles as students explore the history of advanced nursing practice and the interprofessional and sociopolitical contexts in which it operates. The interrelated domains of advanced nursing practice (ANP) practice, consultation, education, research, and leadership are explored in the context of older adult care, as well as ANP practice roles such as clinical nurse specialist, clinician, and professional practice leader. Attention is given to the moral issues surrounding aging, including end-of-life issues.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan. (3-0; 0-0)


  • NURS 632 Advanced Nursing Practice II: The Older Adult (3 sem. hrs.)

    An advanced practice course with a specialty focus on older adults nursing care across the spectrum of health and illness. Students develop expertise about role of nurses in the contexts of primary care, home care, parish nursing, long-term care, and palliative-hospice care. Utilizing faith-based perspectives, fundamental concepts pertaining to primary health care, chronic disease management, and the supportive needs of older adults and their families are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan; NURS 631. (3-0; 0-0)


  • Capstone Project

    NURS 660 Consolidation Service Learning Project (3/3 sem. hrs.)

    A synthesis of research, theory, and practice within the students substantive area of focus. Students work alongside a mentor in practice (e.g., education or administration, or advanced practice with the older adult) to design, implement and evaluate a project that is of service to the healthcare community (either practice or education). Although service is an important part of the experience, the main focus is the integration of research, theoretical and practice perspective to a particular practice focus or problem.

    Prerequisite(s): All first-year M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan.


  • NURS 661 Thesis (6 sem. hrs.)

    The thesis provides an opportunity for the student to conduct nursing research in an area of interest, with the guidance of a supervisory committee. The process of research from identification of problem for investigation, research design, data collection and analysis, to written report of findings is the focus.

    Prerequisite(s): All previous M.S.N. courses as per curricular plan.

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This page contains official TWU academic program information.