Trinity Western University

Course Descriptions

Religious Studies

NB: RELS course numbers with the second digit 0 to 5: biblical content courses (e.g. RELS 101 Introduction to Old Testament Studies); second digit 6 to 9: non-biblical content courses (e.g. RELS 160 Introduction to Theology).


    • RELS 100 Introduction to Christianity (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the foundational documents, persons, and events of Christianity. Specifically designed for students who are unfamiliar with the biblical, theological and historical narrative of Christianity and with the role that it has played in the development of western culture.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 101 Introduction to Old Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the major divisions of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Prophets, and Writings), including an orientation to the following areas in the field of Old Testament studies: inspiration, principles of interpretation, canon, text, world of the Old Testament, historical backgrounds, archeology, theology, criticism, literary forms, and apocryphal writings.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 102 Introduction to New Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the major writings of the New Testament (Synoptic Gospels, Pauline, and Johannine Writings), including an orientation to the field of New Testament studies in the same areas as under RELS 101.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 160 Introduction to Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the field of systematic theology. Discusses issues of theological method and the historical development of some major Christian doctrines and relates them to theological issues today.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 222 Israelite Religion (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the religious forms and institutions of the Hebrew people during the Old Testament period, including a consideration of the major theological motifs that pervade the Hebrew religion.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 224 New Testament Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the New Testament writings in their historical setting and chronological sequence with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 226 Gender and the Bible—Text, Tradition, and Interpretation (3 sem. hrs.)

      Focuses on issues related to gender (including such topics as the roles and relationships of female and male characters in the Bible) within the contexts of the ancient Near East, Second Temple Judaism, the Greco-Roman world, the Jesus movement and the early Church. Also provides opportunity for the study and critique of the transmission and interpretation of these traditions within the early, medieval, Reformation, and contemporary eras.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 235, 236 Elementary New Testament Greek (3, 3 sem. hrs.)

      A basic introduction to Koine Greek that is designed to prepare the student for reading the Greek New Testament, including a reading of the Johannine epistles in Greek.

      Cross-listed: GREE 235, 236.

      Prerequisite(s): None for 235; prerequisite for 236 is 235. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 245, 246 Elementary Biblical Hebrew and Exegesis (3, 3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, designed to prepare the student for serious reading and study of the Hebrew Bible.

      NB: Formerly RELS 335, 336.

      Cross-listed: HEBR 245, 246.

      Prerequisite(s): None for 245; prerequisite for 246 is 245. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 240 or 250 Book Study (3 sem. hrs.)

      An exegetical study of a selected Old Testament or New Testament book. A New Testament book study is offered every fall (RELS 250) and an Old Testament book study every spring (RELS 240) for non-Religious Studies majors only.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 261 Holy Spirit, Church, and Last Things (3 sem. hrs.)

      Every area of human life requires a solid theological foundation, consisting of both an informed understanding of Christian doctrine and the ability to view life through the lense of Christian commitment. By exploring three major foci of systematic theology—the doctrines of the Holy Spirit (pneumatology), the church (ecclesiology), and last things (eschatology)—in the light of Scripture, the theological heritage of the Church, and the contemporary context, this course seeks to develop the student's expertise as a theologically informed Christian for the sake of their life and service to God.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101 or 102; RELS 160. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 271 Western World Religions (3 sem. hrs.)

      An analytical and critical study of the phenomena, the conceptual patterns, and the sacred texts of some of the major Western religions. Each religion is studied as a total perspective for life which is embodied in interpersonal and communal life, in cult, and in ideology.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 272 Eastern World Religions (3 sem. hrs.)

      An analytical and critical study of the phenomena, the conceptual patterns, and the sacred texts of some of the major Eastern religions. Each religion is studied as a total perspective for life which is embodied in interpersonal and communal life, in cult, and in ideology.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 285 Introduction to Missions (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course introduces basic concepts in missiology. Foundational notions from Old Testament and New Testament theology of missions are explored. As well, this course considers the rise and development of the missionary movement from apostolic times to the present. Issues arising from applied anthropology as it relates to cross-cultural communication are also developed. Special emphasis is given to discussion of important trends and select strategies in contemporary world mission.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 296 Interacting with Western Worldviews (3 sem. hrs.)

      An evaluation of Christianity's dependence on modernity, the contributions of worldviews that shape our world, contributions of the Enlightenment period, responses of religious pluralism and postmodernism in the quest for a new cosmology as well as gnosticism in the history of Christian thought, and particularly in the New Age movement and in creation spirituality.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): At least second year standing. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 300 Principles of Biblical Interpretation (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the principles of biblical interpretation used in both the Jewish and Christian traditions, including the application of these methods to the major literary genres of the Bible.

      NB: Formerly RELS 200.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 311 History of Ancient Israel (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the various eras of the history of the Hebrew people in the Old Testament period, including a survey of attempted historical reconstructions. Attention is given to such features as pre-history, nationalism, government, and social institutions.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 320 Dead Sea Scrolls (3 sem. hrs.)

      A survey of the texts and major critical issues concerning the scrolls: their origin, interpretation of the Old Testament, and background to the New Testament.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 322 Tracing the Worldviews in the Biblical Story: A Reformational Perspective (3 sem. hrs.)

      Beliefs and concepts that shaped the thoughts and actions of biblical authors. How people have viewed their relationship to God and the world during the course of the history of redemption. Worldviews in the biblical text. An exploration of the biblical story of redemption and its implications for today.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102 (or equivalent); third or fourth year standing. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 331, 332 Readings in the Greek New Testament (3, 3 sem. hrs.)

      A reading of selected texts from the New Testament, including a study of Greek syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

      Cross-listed: GREE 331, 332.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 235, 236. 331 is a prerequisite for 332. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 337, 338 Readings in the Hebrew Bible (3, 3 sem. hrs.)

      A reading of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible, including a study of Hebrew syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

      NB: Formerly RELS 431, 432.

      Cross-listed: HEBR 337, 338.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 245, 246. 337 is a prerequisite for 338. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 340 Current Issues in Biblical Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of the topics currently being discussed in biblical theology, such as the possibility and methodology of a biblical theology, apocalyptic and eschatology, covenant and election, redemption and freedom, worship, church, the righteousness of God, history, society, law and gospel, faith, canon, life and death, suffering, creation, atonement and reconciliation, sin and guilt, wisdom, and worldview.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 341 The Pentateuch (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible with special reference to introduction, exegesis, and history. Attention is given to their historical and theological significance for both Judaism and Christianity.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 342 Psalms and Wisdom Literature (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the place, function, and form of the Psalms and wisdom literature within the context of other ancient Near Eastern literature, including an analysis of selected examples such as Job, Ecclesiastes, and Proverbs.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 350 Biblical Archaeology (3 sem. hrs.)

      A three-week tour of Israel and/or Greece, for the purpose of studying ancient sites and current excavations relating to biblical studies.

      NB: Offered during Summer sessions only.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102.


    • RELS 351 Life and Teaching of Jesus (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the life of Jesus through the eyes of the four evangelists, with special reference to Jesus' teaching on God, man, the Kingdom, righteousness, and prayer. An evaluation of the extra-biblical view of the person of Jesus.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 352 Life and Letters of Paul (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the world, life, and mission of Paul, including an analysis of the central message of the Pauline epistles in their historical setting and chronological order.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 355 Aramaic (3 sem. hrs.)

      Basic grammar. An introduction to Aramaic literature by reading passages of the Aramaic sections of Daniel and Ezra and selections from post-biblical Aramaic.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 245 and 246. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 360 Christian Apologetics (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the nature and methods of defending the Christian faith including an examination of the evidence for and the arguments against a Christian worldview.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102; PHIL 105, 106; or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 361 History of Christianity I (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the history of the Christian Church from the turn of the first century to the eve of the 16th century Reformation with attention to the persons, events, and issues involved in the major developments of Christianity.

      Cross-listed: HIST 361/HIST 561

      Prerequisite(s): HIST 111. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 362 History of Christianity II (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of the development of the Christian Church from the late medieval period through to the early 21st century. Key topics include: the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the Great Awakenings and the rise of modern Evangelicalism, Fundamentalism, and the growth of modern missionary movements, along with a consideration of significant individuals, changes in theology, institutions, devotional practices, gender roles, and attempts to engage and shape culture.

      Cross-listed: HIST 362, HIST 562.

      Prerequisite(s): HIST 112. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 364 The Expansion of Christianity in the Two-thirds World (3 sem. hrs.)

      The expansion of Christianity in the non-Western world from the first century to the present. Attention is given to critiquing those factors which hindered or enhanced the expansion of Christianity during specific eras.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 285 or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 365 Christian Moral Theology RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      Moral theology reflects upon the goodness and evil of human acts, and of the person who performs them, in the light of Divine Revelation and human reason. This course offers an introduction both to mainstream Catholic and evangelical moral theology and contemporary moral issues, emphasizing their common ground and supplementary insights as well as explaining their continuing points of divergence. The course is taught by a Catholic professor, utilizing both Catholic and protestant texts. Specific moral issues to be discussed include abortion, homosexuality, "just war," contraception, divorce, euthanasia, poverty and hunger, and the nature and role of the family.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 366 Theology of the Body RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course reviews the roots and evolution of the modern secular approaches to anthropology and human sexuality and contrast them with those of Christ. This course examines recent developments in theological reflection on the body (John Paul II's theology of the body) and provides a general introduction to Christian anthropology, with particular attention to themes such as creation in the imago Dei, fall and redemption, nature and grace, freedom and rationality, gender and vocation. Due note of convergent and divergent doctrinal positions held by various Christian traditions of the themes are reviewed.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 368 The Reformation (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of European life during the 16th century reformations. Discussions of sin and wholeness, of religion and secular power, of toleration and social order, and of efforts to reform the church and society. An examination of the place of ritual in social life, life in the family, and attitudes to gender.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: HIST 308.

      Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History, including one of HIST 107, 111, 112; or 362; or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 371 Sociology of Religion (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the theories and concepts utilized by sociologists to interpret religious behaviour and the organization of religion.

      Cross-listed: SOCI 331.

      Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 372 Contemporary Catholic Theology of the Love of God RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course traces the theme of the merciful love of God in Scripture and Catholic Tradition, especially in the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Therese of Lisieux, St. Faustina Kowalska, and Pope John Paul II, as well as in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Mercy of God is presented as a central vantage point from which to view more clearly many important elements of Catholic doctrine and spirituality, ethics, and a common springboard for Catholic-Evangelical ecumenism—in other words, the contemporary Catholic worldview. (This is not a course in Catholic apologetics or polemics.)

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 375 The Christian Apologetics of C.S. Lewis RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course provides a detailed study of the theological and apologetic writings of C.S.Lewis. The instructor presents the Christian worldview of Lewis, as well as limitations and problems that may be inherent in his theological vision. The relevance of Lewis' writings to the task of ecumenical theological dialogue is a recurrent theme.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or equivalent with instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 377 Religion in the U.S.A. (3 sem. hrs.)

      Religious developments in the U.S.A. from the beginning of European settlement to today. The relationship between such developments and the political, economic, and social life of the country. The Great Awakenings and the Modernist/Fundamentalist controversy.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: HIST 347.

      Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 378 Religion in Canada (3 sem. hrs.)

      Religious developments in Canada from the beginning of European settlement to today. The relationship between such developments and the political, economic, and social life of the country.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: HIST 348.

      Prerequisite(s): Any two of HIST 235, 236; 361, 362. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 380 Cross-Cultural/Missions Practicum (2 or 3 sem. hrs.)

      A supervised short-term missions/cross-cultural internship/practicum.

      NB: Open only to Inter-Cultural Religious Studies majors or minors.


    • RELS 381 Contemporary Christianity (3 sem. hrs .)

      A study of some significant 20th century theologies and movements. Introductory in nature and both interconfessional and international in scope. Primary attention is given to the origins, character, and contemporary significance of selected theologies and movements. (Formerly RELS 461)

      Prerequisite(s): Two of RELS 101, 102, or 160. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 382 The Catholic Church: Theology and Practice RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course focuses on the theological, liturgical, and spiritual traditions that undergird the Catholic Church and which continue to form her self-understanding. Historically, this course explains and evaluates the development of the Catholic doctrine of the Church in terms of its roots in Scripture and Tradition, and with a particular emphasis on the Pauline understanding of the Church as the Body of Christ, and selected readings from the Church Fathers, as well as developments in Catholic understanding of the Church in different historical periods and social contexts. It also examines the Church in terms of her ongoing mission to the contemporary world implied by Catholic doctrine. Spiritually, this course exams the distinctive teaching of the Second Vatican Council’s “universal call to holiness” which ultimately serves to integrate doctrine and life in each member of the Church. Analysis of these themes are undertaken in dialogue with the perspectives of other Christian traditions, and in the light of the constructive critique they can offer.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160


    • RELS 383 Reason and Belief in God (3 sem. hrs.)

      A survey of central issues arising from the question, "Is belief in God rational?" Topics include arguments concerning the existence of God, religious pluralism, natural science and religious belief, religious language, and critiques of natural theology from Kierkegaard and Reformed Epistemology.

      Cross-listed: PHIL 383.

      Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of Philosophy or third year standing. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 384 Religion, Contextualization, and Culture Change (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the history of contextualization from biblical to modern times, exploring significant models and paradigms of prominent thinkers and evaluating these adaptations and innovations. Also, the social and spiritual dynamics of culture change are examined, with a view to analyzing those processes which help to make the Gospel relevant in the constantly changing world in which we live.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 285. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 385 Suffering and Belief in God (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of key issues pertaining to suffering and belief in God. Topics include the problem of evil, arguments from suffering, original sin, everlasting suffering, and providence.

      Cross-listed: PHIL 384.

      Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of Philosophy or third year standing. (3-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 386 Global Theologies (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course seeks to extend the study of theology to the manner in which non-Western communities of Christians endeavour to shape their world by their faith. Special emphasis is given to examining Christology and Soteriology from a cross-cultural perspective and to the manner by which both Western and non-Western traditions may interact to enrich hermeneutics, missiology, and biblical and systematic theology.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 285 or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 387 Christian Theology in Ecumenical Dialogue RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      A survey and analysis of the main achievements of the ecumenical theological dialogue process among the Christian churches, and the significant challenges still facing that dialogue today. This course utilizes texts from Catholic, Protestant Evangelical, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican sources, and guest lecturers from Catholic, Evangelical, and Orthodox traditions.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 388 Christian Church and Sacraments RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course provides an introduction to the Christian understanding of the doctrine of the Church and the Sacraments. This course provides an in-depth look at the origins, development, and theological significance of the doctrine of the Church and studies the classical Christian understanding of the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, the Eucharist (Lord's Supper), Penance and Reconciliation, Anointing the Sick, Holy Orders and Matrimony. Given that the Catholic and Protestant traditions understand the fundamental theological sources differently, the course emphasizes their common commitment to Sacred Scripture, while explaining their divergent perspectives with regard to the role of tradition. The course outlines the central importance of the doctrine of the Church to the Christian life, and presents both Catholic and Evangelical perspectives on these issues.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 398 Radical Religion in the 16th to 18th Centuries (3 sem. hrs.)

      Radical Christian movements from the Reformation period to the early Enlightenment: 16th century Anabaptism, German Spiritualism, radical German Pietism and American Pietism, early English Separatism, radical Puritanism, the Levellers, early Baptists, the Philadelphian movement, and the Methodist movement. Class time is divided between lectures and seminar discussion of primary source readings.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: HIST 398.

      Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 107, 111, 112; or 362. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 399 Catholic Spirituality in the Modern World RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      An analysis of the teachings on prayer and the devout life of Catholic spiritual writers whose teachings still enrich the life of the Church today: especially St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Bonaventure, St. Francis De Sales, St. Therese of Lisieux, and the Venerable John Henry Newman. This course includes an overview of controversial topics such as the rise of "Centering Prayer," the "New Age" movement, and an analysis of the teachings of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and reflections on the Catholic Tradition of Spirituality from non-Catholic perspectives.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160, or equivalent with instructor's permission. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 400, 480 Directed Studies (3, 3 sem. hrs.)

      Independent but guided research in a specialized area of interest to student. RELS 400 designates biblical content courses; RELS 480, theological/cultural emphases.

      Prerequisite(s): Consent of Department chair.


    • RELS 415 Intertestamental Literature (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the intertestamental Judaic literature, noting the relationships between this literature and the Old Testament and New Testament and showing how this literature serves as an important background for the study of the New Testament documents.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 423 Apocalyptic Literature (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the origin, form, and function of apocalyptic literature as well as important motifs and themes.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 425 Pauline Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

      A survey of the general contours of Paul's thinking and a closer examination of one particular aspect of his theology, such as the origins of his gospel, the problem of coherence and contingency, his apostleship, his missionary strategy, his Christology, or the theology of one of his letters.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 430 The New Testament and the Greco-Roman World (3 sem. hrs.)

      An investigation of the interface between the New Testament and the Greco-Roman world, with an emphasis on the literary, documentary, and archeological sources for such an investigation. Readings in extra-biblical Greek sources are a regular feature of the course.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102; 235, 236 (or concurrent enrolment therein). (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 446 Hebrew Prophets (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the origin, function, and meaning of the Hebrew prophets through a survey of the prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible, including a discussion of the relationship to the historical periods in which they were composed and their theological significance within Judaism and Christianity.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 448 Ancient Near East and the Old Testament (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of selected ancient Near Eastern texts and their relevance for the exegesis of the Old Testament.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 449 Old Testament Seminar (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of selected topics that are currently under examination in the field of Old Testament studies.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102 and third or fourth year standing. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 453 The Synoptic Gospels and Acts (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, focusing on the gospel form and the message of the individual gospels in their historical context. In addition, the Acts of the Apostles is considered with a view to better understanding the Church's birth and expansion.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 454 The Johannine Writings (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introductory study of the major historical and literary problems of the writings traditionally ascribed to John: the Gospel of John, Johannine Epistles, and the Book of Revelation. In addition, attention is given to their thought and symbolism.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 456 New Testament Seminar (3 sem. hrs.)

      A study of selected topics that are currently under examination in the field of New Testament studies.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102, and third or fourth year standing. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 460 Current Trends and Issues in Missions (3 sem. hrs.)

      Current missiological themes are studied such as: Missio Dei, Salvation Today, social justice and mission, meaning of evangelism and evangelization, contextualization, liberation themes, missions as inculturation, missions as an ecumenical expression, mobilizing the laity for missions, missions as a theology, and missions as an eschatological hope. The course also examines shifting missiological paradigms within the Conciliar Movement and Evangelical responses.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102; and 285. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 465 Influential Thinkers in the Western Christian Tradition (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to some seminal figures in the Western Christian tradition. The course investigates their thought and intellectual contributions within their socio-political context and experience.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102 and third year standing. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 466 The Church Fathers (3 sem. hrs.)

      An introduction to the fathers of the early church, roughly defined as churchmen who were active from the age of Clement of Rome (ca. 96 CE) to the Council of Chalcedon (451 CE). Attention is paid to the historical and liturgical context within which the fathers lived and ministered, the theological/philosophical influences on them, and their own theological influence upon the church. The student has the opportunity to focus on one specific father, or theological issue of his/her choice with the responsibility of fitting that father or issue into the wider context of his/its setting. Class time is also devoted to the discussion of the relevance of the fathers for the contemporary church.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or HIST/RELS 361. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 467 The Theology of Karl Barth (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course is an examination and deeper understanding of Karl Barth's theology. Primary attention is given to the character, development, and significance of Barth's theology. The student also reads Karl Barth in the context of Christian thought.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160; 361, 362; RELS 381 recommended. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 470 Psychology of Religion (3 sem. hrs.)

      An application of the tools of empirical psychology to the study of the development and function of religious experience. An analysis of the role of religious experience in the human personality. Specific religious experiences (e.g. conversion, prayer, glossolalia, miracles) are examined with a view to understanding their function in the normal individual.

      Cross-listed: PSYC 440.

      Prerequisite(s): PSYC 105, 106, and third year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 473: The Theology of Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II RP (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course takes an in-depth look at the theological vision of the two most influential Catholic theologians of the second Christian millennium: St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II. The main features of St. Thomas's synthesis of Christian thought, especially as found in his great Summa Theologiae, is explored. This is followed by an examination of the "personalist" Thomism of Pope John Paul II, and his program for the renewal of the Catholic Faith, especially as found in selected encyclicals and apostolic letters. The vision and worldview of St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II are presented as significant and enduring achievements of Christian thought.

      NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or equivalent with permission of instructor. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 475 Christianity and Culture (3 sem. hrs.)

      This course examines important aspects of Christianity's involvement in western culture. Alternative models and historical examples of this involvement are considered as well as some specific current issue related to Christian cultural activity.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 476 Christian Worldviews in Historical and Cultural Context (3 sem. hrs.)

      The nature and scope of a Christian worldview. Some salient moments in the history of Christian worldview thinking, and in particular in the Reformational tradition of the past two centuries. Implications of views of Christ's lordship for various spheres of life, such as politics, art, science, and the environment. Personal responses to the challenges for a Christian worldview in today's pluralist society.

      NB: This course functions as an alternative to IDIS 400. Students may not take both this course and IDIS 400 for credit.

      Prerequisite(s): At least one RELS course with a second number from 6 to 9; also third or fourth year standing and completion of at least 70 sem. hrs. of study by end of preceding semester. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 477 New Testament Canon: Development and Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

      Investigates the theological implications of the historical development of the New Testament canon. Stress is laid upon the contextual reading of primary source evidence and its interpretation in important secondary source literature. New Testament canon development is explored as it relates to the Rule of Faith, the early councils, creeds, and the church fathers. These relationships are then investigated with a view toward how they influence our understanding of Scripture in the 21st century.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or HIST 361 or RELS 362. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 478 Atonement Theology in Contemporary Context (3 sem. hrs.)

      An exploration into the doctrine of the atonement, both in its historical and contemporary settings. Explores how the cross is God's answer to human sin and oppression. Also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional atonement models and the implications of atonement theology for the Church and contemporary society.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102; 160. (0-0; 3-0)


    • RELS 482 Historical Perspectives on Reformation and Post-Reformation Thought (3 sem. hrs.)

      A re-evaluation of the issues involved in the origin of the 16th century Protestant Reformation and the subsequent development of Calvinist thought: justification by faith, covenant theology, and election. An analysis of why Calvinists and Arminians were unable to overcome their differences, and how Reformed scholasticism went beyond John Calvin's insights.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: HIST 482.

      Prerequisite(s): RELS 101, 102; 160; and at least third year standing; or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)


    • RELS 483 The Evidential Force of Religious Experience (3 sem. hrs.)

      Examines the place of evidence in religion and assesses the evidential force of religious experience. Such experiences as near-death, visions, conversions, mystical states of consciousness, and other topics that have been the focus of ongoing public attention are discussed.

      NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.

      Cross-listed: PHIL 483.

      Prerequisite(s): Third year standing and 6 sem. hrs. of Philosophy or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 488 Special Topics in Missiology (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of special topics or issues in Missiology that are not considered in depth in other courses.

      Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of Religious Studies including RELS 285, and third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 489 Special Topics in Religious Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

      An examination of special topics or issues in Religious Studies that are not considered in depth in other courses.

      Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of RELS courses, and third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)


    • RELS 490 Christianity and the Natural Sciences (1 sem. hr.)

      Presentation and discussion of special topics concerned with the relationship between science and the Christian faith.

      Cross-listed: NATS 490.

      Prerequisite(s): NATS 487 or CMPT 480. (0-0; 0-1)

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This page contains official TWU academic program information.