Trinity Western University

Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities

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English

  • ENGL 510: The Writing of Creative Non-Fiction / 3 s.h.

    "Simply by choosing to write in the genre of ‘nonfiction,' one makes an artistic statement. One must assume that the work is rooted in the real world; though the writing might contain some elements of fabrications, it's directly connected to the writer as the author behind the text."

    This course is a seminar in the reading and writing of literary nonfiction and in the development of a critical appreciation of its various forms. This course will examine life writing in terms of its literary forms, as the authors' responses to their culture, and as texts within which identity is shaped and altered by the intentional acts of their writers. It will examine current theories of life writing, based on the assumption that life writing participates in the construction of the identity and the historicity of the individual. Chosen texts will demonstrate the art of life writing, as well as paradigms for its interpretation and its literary and cultural influence. As the genre of literature in ascendency among readers and writers during this century, it bears careful examination as a means of navigating the reclamation of human selfhood and spirituality in our postmodern condition. The purpose of this course is to provide approaches to the reading and writing of literary nonfiction. Studies will include the techniques of writing creative nonfiction and the critical appreciation of this form, known as the "fourth genre." Such forms as (auto)biography, memoir, letters, diaries, travel and nature writing, and personal essays will provide the models for students' exploration of this genre. Examples will be drawn from writers such as C.S. Lewis, Thomas Merton, E.M. Forster, George Orwell, Michael Ondaatje, Annie Dillard, Kathleen Norris, Flannery O'Connor, John Bunyan, Virginian Woolf, and others who form part of the literary canon of such writing.

  • ENGL 512: Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine representative works of twentieth-century American literary prose and the development of its themes in various historical, political, and socio-cultural contexts, including the major wars and social upheavals in which American society has been involved in the last hundred years.In so doing, students will examine the major themes and values that comprise a canon of literature which addresses the literary movements characterized by Realism and Naturalism and the contexts of Modernism and Postmodernism in which literature has responded to them in the American tradition.American literature and its contributions to the discussions on religion, morality and Christianity, and the relationship between the three, will be engaged.

  • ENGL 522: Chaucer / 3 s.h.

    This course focuses on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Book of the Duchess. Care is taken to develop a good reading knowledge of Chaucerian Middle English. The social, economic, political, and spiritual principles in Chaucer's texts, and the aesthetic techniques employed to shape them, will be situated within the historical and cultural context of Ricardian, or late fourteenth-century England. Chaucer wrote for a populace that had confronted decimating plagues as well as social, economic and religious upheaval. We will draw out the competing medieval voices that emerge in the works composed in this context, which often articulate searing critiques of a complex, disorderly, patriarchal, violent, and humorous medieval world.

  • ENGL 530: Medieval Literature / 3 s.h.

    In medieval Europe, a vital tradition of Christian spirituality emerged and flourished. The urgent longing to know, commune with, and abandon the self in, the divine was articulated in myriad spiritual works. Though many spiritual sojourners sought and experienced union with God, they did not always describe their mystical paths and encounters in the same terms. Each medieval mystic’s experiences emerged out a particular historical moment and cultural context. So too was each numinous experience shaped by the gender, social station, familial context, occupation, institutional affiliation, and living conditions of each mystic.

    This course will focus on the rich and varied visionary and mystical literature of the Early, High and Late Middle Ages, including the writings of Bernard of Clairvaux, Richard of St. Victor, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Richard Rolle, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing, and Meister Eckhart. The influence of early theologians and philosophers (such as Origen, Plotinus, and Augustine) on these mystics will be considered in some detail, as will the influence of the medieval mystics on mystical thinkers of Renaissance Europe (including Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross).This course also seeks to read the ontological and epistemological elements of medieval mysticism through the filter of modern philosophical paradigms.

  • ENGL 534: European Literature in Translation / 3 s.h.

    A survey of European drama and prose classics from the 13th to the 20th century, this course explores and critically evaluates the shift in world views from Dante's Christian humanism to Kafka's and Camus' modern existentialist view of human existence. In order to provide depth to our analysis of the works and to highlight the significance of the shift in world view, the works will be discussed in their historical, philosophical, and cultural context, in combination with close reading and various theoretical interpretative approaches.

  • ENGL 551: Shakespeare I / 3 s.h.

    This course will analyze seven plays by William Shakespeare, including three tragedies, a history play, a comedy, and two romances, in addition to his narrative poem Venus and Adonis. It will consider Shakespeare’s plays as both established literary works and as scripts written for performance and will apply different critical approaches to his works in an attempt to discover the source and nature of their aesthetic power and dramatic force. In the process, we shall determine whether William Shakespeare is, as some have claimed, the greatest and most influential writer of all time.

  • ENGL 552: Shakespeare II / 3 s.h.

    In this course, we will analyze seven plays by William Shakespeare, including three tragedies, two comedies, a problem play and a romance, in addition to a selection of his sonnets. The Shakespearean works will be read within the historically specific cultural context in which they were produced. We will consider Shakespeare's plays as dynamic scripts written for performance and as established literary works. We will pay particular attention to the way in which Shakespeare blurs generic, thematic, and ideological boundaries in his poetic and dramatic works - exploring his fusion of the tragic and the comic, the sacred and the profane, the noble and the plebeian, the fantastic and the historic, and the orthodox and the transgressive. We will apply different critical approaches to his works in an attempt to discover the source and nature of their aesthetic power, dramatic force, and political significance.

  • ENGL 553: Milton / 3 s.h.

    The poet and polemicist John Milton sought to create a public identity for himself in a time of political and cultural change. Convinced that he was the “sole advocate of a discount’nanc’t truth” in a fragile emerging state, Milton sought cultural capital through aesthetic, priestly, and political discourse. He presented himself as an official, divinely inspired public spokesman for the evolving British nation, averring, in the Defensio sedunda: “It is a singular favour of the divinity towards me, that I, above others, was chosen out to defend the cause of liberty.” In this course, we will read the major poetic works and selected prose of Milton in light of his claim to be the delegated spokesperson for God and Parliament in early-modern England. Milton’s works will be seen both to reflect the tension and trauma of the Civil War, Interregnum and Restoration, and to participate in shaping a new state and new modes of existence.

  • ENGL 554: Renaissance Poetry and Prose / 3 s.h.

    In this course, we will examine representative selections of the poetry and prose of the “High” and “Late” Renaissance periods in England, covering a century from about 1580-1680. This era was characterized by an impressive range of literary output that has never been rivalled in the western world. Even apart from the work of the most eminent figures -- Shakespeare and Milton -- this period offers a rich and varied legacy of poetry and impressive essays, treatises, and allegories, by such great literary figures as Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Jonson, Bacon, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Browne, Walton, Pepys, and Bunyan who, along with other selected authors, will be represented in this course. Since literature cannot be fully appreciated in a vacuum, we will also address the political, religious, and theological controversies that energized so much of the writing of this dynamic century.

  • ENGL 556: Seventeenth-Century Women Writers / 3 s.h.

    A survey of women’s writing in seventeenth-century Britain and America. This course will examine the poetry, prose and dramatic works of literary figures such as Lady Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, Anne Bradstreet, Katherine Philips, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

    During the seventeenth-century, political, religious, and economic formations in the were interrogated and fundamentally altered. Between the reigns of James I and Queen Anne, the monarchy was abolished, restored and redefined and the authority of the Parliament established. Many men and women cried out for freedom of religion and liberty of conscience, some seeking religious independence in the New World . The authority of the British Church , fractured as beliefs diversified, was threatened by the “scientific” rationalism of Francis Bacon and his successors, some of whom founded the Royal Society.Though dependent on the newly emerging commercial economy for its wealth and power, the nation was still largely dominated by the landed elite; this state of affairs fostered resentment in the mercantile class.

    This turbulent period saw an upsurge of literary activity by women. More than two hundred and fifty women authors in and published poetry, fiction, drama, epistles, translations, pamphlets, manifestos and manuals. Those who rejected print culture circulated their works in manuscripts among an exclusive network of family and friends. The writings of these early-modern women address not only what it is to be a woman in early-modern, but what it is to be human, an activity which involves their engagement with historical practices, philosophical concepts, political theories, and theological tenets.

  • ENGL 567: Drama to 1627 / 3 s.h.

    The study of selected dramatic works written in English prior to the closing of the theatres in 1642, including medieval mystery and morality plays and works by Elizabethan, Jacobean and Caroline playwrights, excluding Shakespeare.

  • ENGL 572: Romantic Poetry and Poetics / 3 s.h.

    Representative works by such "Pre-Romantic" authors as Burns and Blake precede a more intensive study of the poetry and critical theories of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Some attention is given to the essays of Lamb, Hazlitt, and Thomas De Quincey.

  • ENGL 573: Victorian Poetry and Prose / 3 s.h.

    This course will explore the poetry and non-fictional prose of significant British literary figures from 1830-1900, a period of controversial and divergent thought. We will pay particular attention to how the literature of this period reflects its society’s preoccupation with politics, history, religion, education, art, and the “woman question.”

  • ENGL 584: Contemporary Canadian Novel / 3 s.h.

    A study of representative works of contemporary Canadian fiction and the development of the post-modern, post-colonial, post-national novel. Authors (a minimum of six) may include a selection of Atwood, Brand, Findley, Hodgins, Hood, King, Martel, Mistry, Munro, Ondaatje, Sky Lee, Urquhart, Vanderhaeghe, and Wiebe.

  • ENGL 591: Children's Literature / 3 s.h.

    In this course we will examine children’s literature from the seventeenth century to the present, analyzing representative texts and changing attitudes toward children and their books. Beginning with early didactic stories and traditional folk and fairy tales, and then moving on to British, American, and Canadian novels, we will focus on questions of history, philosophy, authorship, readership, and genre. Our emphasis will be on close critical readings of the texts.

  • ENGL 592: Studies in Individual Authors / 3 s.h.

    This course is designed to give students the opportunity of studying for an entire semester the works of no more than two significant authors.

  • ENGL 593: Fantasy Literature / 3 s.h.

    The rising popularity of contemporary fantasy fiction as possible ‘counter-text’ to mainstream realism may lead readers to assume that this is a relatively new genre, and indeed one outside the usual canon of academic attention as it has been sometimes regarded. While some make the bold claim that fantasy is “the dominant literary mode of the twentieth century” and J.R.R. Tolkien “the most influential author” (Shippey), other critics have dismissed the genre and Tolkien in particular (Duggan, Toynbee). But fantasy literature which enjoyed a renaissance in the nineteenth-century with George MacDonald, who in turn influenced twentieth-century authors such as C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L’Engle, is in fact a much older form of literature that points to all things magical, mythic, and supernatural. In this course we will examine the long history of fantasy texts by first locating these works within the Anglo-Saxon epic and the Medieval romance literary traditions in English literature, Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and then consider how these shape the imagination of creators of modern fantasy. We will also consider the argument that modern fantasy is a response to post-Enlightenment rationalism in its tendency to marginalize both imaginative and religious epistemology, and so is a discourse of recovery. As Le Guin claims, “fantasy is the natural, the appropriate, language for the recounting of the spiritual journey and the struggle of good and evil in the soul.” Through close reading of the texts and considering these in relation to various forms of theoretical inquiry—historical, sociological, psychological, ethical, and spiritual or theological—students will have the opportunity to assess the ongoing impact of fantasy literature. And notably, since many of the achievements in this genre have been works of the Christian imagination, students will engage in the critical task of considering various Christian cultural responses and our possible readings of these fantasies.

  • ENGL 594: Studies in the Writings of C.S. Lewis / 3 s.h.

    In this course we will focus on the literary achievement of C.S. Lewis, prominent Inklings author, analyzing representative texts in his poetry, essays, and novels. Beginning with his allegory, The Pilgrim’s Regress, and then moving on to some of his Chronicles of Narnia, The Screwtape Letters, and various fantasy novels such as Perelandra and Till We Have Faces, together with selected poems and essays, we will examine his mythopoeic vision and its contribution to Christianity and culture. Through close reading of the texts, and considering these in relation to various forms of theoretical inquiry—historical, sociological, psychological, gender discourse, ethical, and spiritual or theological—students will engage in the critical task of assessing the ongoing impact of the literature of C.S. Lewis.

  • ENGL 595: Literary Theory and Criticism / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • ENGL 599: Language & Style / 3 s.h.

    When we use the English language to communicate with others, we are consciously or unconsciously applying our knowledge of English language structure at many levels. In literary communication, these same language structures are used for an aesthetic purpose. To interpret and evaluate a work of literature, it is fundamentally important to be able to identify and describe the way in which language is used in the text.

    The course has four main components, beginning with the sound level of English. We study the description, classification and phonetic transcription of speech sounds and their combination in spoken English (phonology). From this basis, we proceed to the words of English, including units of meaning and principles of word formation (morphology), the classification of words into word classes and word meaning (semantics). This is followed by an investigation of English sentence structure (syntax), including the structure of phrases and clauses. Finally, we consider the meaning of sentences and their communicative functions as well as the contexts of language use (pragmatics). Throughout the course, salient literary usages of the linguistic structures are demonstrated by the detailed analysis of examples chosen from English poetic, narrative and dramatic texts.

    The course is offered from a descriptive perspective, an approach not situated exclusively in any specific linguistic theory. The course is informed by the central importance of language in the Christian tradition of faith and learning.

  • ENGL 600: CORE SEMINAR - Reading the signs of the times: Text and Interpretation / 3 s.h.

    In accordance with interpretive theories over the last fifty years, this course recognizes the central and foundational importance of texts in our relation to the world around us. Postmodern criticism has questioned and changed the way we understand texts and their interpretation by emphasizing the mediated nature of all perception, and the importance of language and texts for this mediation. As an introductory course to the English stream of an interdisciplinary program, this course is designed to orient students to the crucial transition from modernist to postmodernist and post-postmodernist models of texts and interpretation, models which depend on changing philosophical views of truth and reality. At the heart of textual and interpretive theories lies the question of human nature and its engagement with reality. This has been the focus of liberal humanist models of interpretation (From Plato to structuralism), their postmodern critique (poststructuralism and beyond) and should be the focus of a Christian humanist response to these developments. The world-constituting power of texts requires literary studies philosophy, theology and the poetic must come together. In full awareness of this intrinsically interdisciplinary nature of literature, this course examines the main interpretive paradigms in literary studies in order to show how our views of reason, language, and textuality continue to shape our life horizons. Reading the signs of the times is part of the Christian vocation, whether these are texts of literary or cultural signs; this course is meant to address this calling. The course segments will be ordered thematically to facilitate thematic coherence rather than chronological order.

  • ENGL 607: Life Writing as a Literary Genre: Biography as Identification of Self and Subjectivity / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine life studies/biographies as their authors’ responses to their culture, as texts within which identity is shaped and altered by the intentional acts of their writers. It will examine current theories of biography by including life studies written by individuals whose association with the literary order has its origins in marginalized/ immigrant experience. This course assumes that life writing participates in the construction of subjectivity. Chosen texts will interrogate how authors resist or subvert, through biographical writing, institutional attempts to define and control their identity; how gender/class/religious beliefs impact life writing. Theorists including Paul Ricoeur, Michel Foucault, Terry Eagleton, George Steiner, Judith Butler, Susan Sontag, Carol Heilbruner, Hannah Arendt, and Jean-Paul Sartre will be foundational to this study of literary biography and identity in its examination of how life writers situate themselves in the conflicts between family and cultural circles in their attempts at successful acculturation. Works studied will include biographical writings from canonical authors including Elie Wiesel, Maxine Hong Kingston, Eva Hoffman, Anne Michaels, James Baldwin, Frederick Buechner, Paul Balakian, Andrei Mekine, Frank McCourt and others, less known but representing particularized Canadian marginalized immigrant voices, including Modris Eckstein and Janice Kulyk Keifer.

  • ENGL 607: Shakespearean Trauma and The Early-Modern Suffering Self / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine the treatment of the “traumatic” in the dramatic works of William Shakespeare. Given that the concept of psychological trauma was formulated and developed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the course will examine the extent to which this modern psychological concept can be appropriately applied to pre-modern texts, particularly the early-modern plays of William Shakespeare. Modern discourses used to categorize and describe Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will be compared with the early-modern discourses of suffering, violation, grief, melancholy, despair etc. that appear in Shakespearean texts. This comparison will assist in the determination of whether such Shakespearean emotions are historically-embedded and culturally-specific or whether they are universal, transhistorical emotions that can, and should, be aligned with modern accounts of the traumatic.

  • ENGL 607: Studies in George MacDonald / 3 s.h.

    This course is designed to give students the opportunity to study the contributions of the nineteenth century author, George MacDonald, to fantasy and realistic fiction. MacDonald, a prolific and popular writer, was a formative figure in the Victorian “renaissance of wonder,” and is also considered to be an influential writer to various 20th century authors. The uniqueness of his Christian mythopoeic vision, blending Scottish Calvinism and a Romantic celebration of imagination and spirituality, is the subject of growing critical attention. In this course, we will read representative texts from the fantasy novels and fairytales, the realistic novels, and essays on literature and theology.

  • ENGL 607: Kierkegaard's Postcript / 3 s.h.

    Concluding Unscientific Postscript stands at the end of Kierkegaard's ‘first authorship', and constitutes the turning point between the pseudonymous aesthetic writings and the religious writings to which Kierkegaard put his own name. Because of its transitional nature, Postscript serves as an excellent introduction to Kierkegaard's philosophical and religious thought. However, Postscript not only occupies an important place in Kierkegaard's corpus and in the Western philosophical canon, but also within the overall corpus of Western literature. Kierkegaard's own familiarity with literature and the fine arts saturates his aesthetic writings, resulting in a unique corpus that crosses key disciplinary boundaries. As such, Kierkegaard's thought is not only important philosophically, but for a range of cultural studies. While our primary goal in this course is to mine the philosophical and religious insights of Postscript, a secondary goal will be to examine how the writings of Walker Percy and Guy Vanderhaeghe, which owe a large debt to Kierkegaard, can effectively disclose certain aspects of his thought.

  • ENGL 607: Studies in the Late-Victorian Fiction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle / 3 s.h.

    The purpose of this directed study is to examine Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's representation of crime in London through the character of detective Sherlock Holmes and his assistant Dr. Watson. Through an in-depth study of the Sherlock Holmes stories published in the Strand magazine between 1891 and 1905, we will analyze Doyle's presentation of the ethical questions raised by Holmes' detective work and his scientific methods, as well as the representation of the heroic and the reader's understanding of Holmes through Watson's meta-narrative. In the course of this study, we will examine Doyle's own scientific and medical background, the true-life inspiration for the character of Sherlock Holmes, and the reception and continuing cultural reinterpretation of the Sherlock Holmes stories. We will examine the heroic model of Holmes, situated between the romantic era and the burgeoning scientific era; the search for truth through narrative; the epistemological necessity of "the other"; and the role of sacrifice in the pursuit of truth.

  • ENGL 607: The Poetics of Resistance, Affirmation and Immigrant Voices and the Poetry of Trauma / 3 s.h.

    A study of twentieth-century poetics, its forms and conventions, as investigated through the poetry of immigrant experience in North America, particularly in terms of trauma and its assimilation in the personal and public spheres. This course will offer students a thorough exposure to the various schools of North American poetry in the modern and postmodern periods with an emphasis on the ruptures in and establishment of conventions new to the genre: War Poetry, Confessional Poetry, Spiritual Poetry, Protest Poetry and Identity Poetry. Poets studied will include Czeslaw Milosz, Sarah Klassen, Michael Ondaatje and Anne Michaels. Students will be required to apply literary analysis of theoretical aspects of poetics such as voicing, music, syntactical manipulation, complex metaphor and imaging. Historical contexts and cultural influences will be the contexts for these studies as will various theoretical and interpretive practices, including New Criticism, New Historicism, Psychoanalytic and Feminist approaches.

  • ENGL 607: James Baldwin: The Dialectic of Race and Religion / 3 s.h.

    This course will engage the fiction and nonfiction writings of James Baldwin, twentieth century black American writer of more than a dozen works between (dates). His works reflected the struggle for identity and its definition in terms of race, religion and sexuality. In his self-definition, religion and race grounded his narratology in its earlier stages. Ultimately, the nexus of race and religion set the parameters of his quest for identity; sexuality was the concealed aspect of personhood which confounded his search. In examining Baldwin's works, literary and theoretical analysis will be employed in the discovery of the power of language to expose and determine the nature of Baldwin's engagement of this search and its reflection of his own black American community and culture.

  • ENGL 610: Bibliography / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • ENGL 611/12: Thesis / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • ENGL 613: Major Essay / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • ENGL 615: Of Paradise and Light: Early Modern Devotional Writing / 3 s.h.

    This course is focused on the study of the literary expression of religious desire, doubt, and despair in early-modern British literature. The aesthetic shaping of spiritual belief and sentiment, within specific historical and cultural contexts, will be investigated in a selection of early-modern works, including those by Anne Vaughan Lock, Robert Southwell, George Herbert, John Donne, Elizabeth Melville, Henry Vaughan, Richard Crashaw, An Collins, Thomas Traherne, John Bunyan, George Fox, and Margaret Fell Fox. Their works will be read alongside religious texts central to the Catholic and Protestant traditions, including the Geneva Bible, the Douay-Rheims Bible, the King James Bible, the Book of Common Prayer, John Fox's Book of Martyrs, the Thirty-Nine Articles, the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, and Joseph Hall's The Art of Divine Meditation.

  • ENGL 620: (Auto)biography as Literary Genre: Self-Identification and Subjectivity / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine auto/biographies as literary artifacts, responses to culture, and as texts within which identity is shaped and altered by the intentional acts of their writers. It will examine current theories of auto/biography by including life studies written by individuals whose association with the literary order has its origins in intellectual and cultural spheres.This course explores how life writing participates in the construction of identity and engages subjectivity as a narrative strategy. Chosen texts will interrogate how authors resist/subvert/assume, through auto/biographical writing, institutional attempts to define and control their identity; how gender/class/religious beliefs impact life writing; how consciousness of the self and its identification becomes a hermeneutic for interpretation. Theorists including Paul Ricoeur, George Steiner, Richard Kearney, and Eva Hoffman will be foundational to this study. The reading list will include auto/biographical writings from authors such as Elie Wiesel, Victor Frankl, Eva Hoffman, Anne Michaels, Michael Ondaatje, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Richard Foster, John Bunyan, Frederick Buechner, Annie Dillard, Virginia Woolf, Lytton Strachey, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Thomas Merton, C.S. Lewis, and other significant auto/biographers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  • ENGL 625: Christian Humanism / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • ENGL 630: Religion, Gender and Literature in Nineteenth C Britain / 3 s.h.

    This course will provide an intensive study of how the writers of influential nineteenth-century British literary texts (including short and long poems, a novella, novels, and prose non-fiction), chose to portray the intersection of religious faith and gender. This course will not only familiarize students with the most significant nineteenth-century British authors, but will also enable a thorough exploration of two of the most prevalent areas of debate in the nineteenth century: gender roles and questions of faith. We will focus on these texts as literature, taking into consideration genre, literary techniques, and audience, but the course as a whole will cross disciplinary boundaries as students read philosophical and historical writers such as John Stuart Mill and John Ruskin. Students will also become familiar with the major theoretical approaches applied to these texts by contemporary literary critics.

  • ENGL 645: The Great Tradition: Christian Thought in Western Literary Classics / 3 s.h.

    This course will focus on one overarching theme: how Christian thought is embedded in some of the greatest literary classics of the Western World, selected from the Patristic period up to the twentieth century. These include, in chronological order, such diverse genres as St. Augustine’s autobiographical ruminations in his Confessions; Dante’s Inferno, the most famous section of his tripartite theological epic, The Divine Comedy; Shakespeare’s most popular, yet enigmatic, tragedy, Hamlet; Milton’s epic theodicy, Paradise Lost; Bunyan’s dynamic biblically infused allegory, The Pilgrim’s Progress; Goethe’s multifaceted poetic drama, Faust; Hardy’s reassessment of Christian mores in late nineteenth century England in his great novel, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; T.S. Eliot’s dramatic modern affirmation in Murder in the Cathedral.

  • ENGL 655: Children's Literature: An Historical Survey of Philosophy and Genre / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

 

History

  • HIST 503: Engendered History / 3 s.h.

    This seminar will examine specific topics in the history of gender throughout the period known loosely as the modern world. The course is designed to clarify the process through which ideas of gender evolved and the ways in which masculinity and femininity have been constructed and experienced in a global context. The seminar will also examine group interactions across lines of race, class, ethnicity, region, and religion and the influence of groups striving to assert their own identities on ideas of gender.

  • HIST 504: Late Medieval Europe / 3 s.h.

    An inquiry into a period of Europe's past in which beliefs, attitudes and institutions, molded in the previous centuries, were consolidated into shapes that mark modern European[and North American] culture. The outlines of the modern state and of the modern family will be examined. It is also an examination of late medieval civilization for indications of decline and rebirth. The course looks for signs of struggle between forces of tradition and of innovation, and between idealism and material or corporeal realities.

  • HIST 506: War, Peace and Society / 3 s.h.

    History 506 will survey the changing nature of and approaches to war and its effect on society from the Middle Ages to the present including an examination of various visions and proposals for peace. The course will include an assessment of relatively recent armed conflict in Africa, Central Europe and the Middle East, exploring the causes of contemporary conflict and some of its distinctive characteristics. We will also evaluate the effectiveness of various strategies for preventing, abating, and terminating current forms of conflict.

    Some of the questions we will discuss are: Why do states go to war? How do they create a lasting peace? What role does morality play in foreign policy? What is our obligation to just peace or just war?

  • HIST 507: Renaissance Europe / 3 s.h.

    HIST 507 is a graduate-level course designed to survey a historical period in greater depth while introducing students to related primary and secondary sources. Students will be familiarized with major themes, events, and issues of interpretation in the history of European history from approximately the mid-fourteenth through to the sixteenth century. Particular attention will be paid to the “rebirth” of ancient Greek and Roman culture that began in the Italian commercial and educational centres of Milan, Florence, Venice and Rome. This course will examine the social, intellectual, artistic, political and economic history of the Renaissance as it developed in Italy and spread to the rest of Europe. These and other topics will be explored through close readings of primary sources. Students will also consider various methodological and theoretical approaches that have influenced the way that modern historians have analyzed and explained this period in European history.

  • HIST 508: Reformation Europe / 3 s.h.

    The course examines the nature of religious reform in the sixteenth century. Religious ideas will be the starting point for an examination of economic conditions, the existing social structure, the family, and the state. The course examines how ideas were communicated to and received by the common people. It also examines displays of intolerance and tolerance, coercion and power, and relations between government and society and between women and men.

  • HIST 509: Early Modern Europe: 1600-1789 / 3 s.h.

    An examination of developments and events from 1600 to 1800 including religious wars, the witch craze, growth of absolutism and political rights, enlightened despots, movements within the church and the culture of the enlightenment. In addition wealth and poverty, social hierarchies, popular customs and culture, marriage, the family and gender will be examined.

  • HIST 510: History in Practice / 3 s.h.

    An analysis of the practice of history in the public sphere including the ways in which communities, regions, nations, and others entities collect, manage, create, present and understand their histories, pasts, and stories. How forms of historical consciousness show themselves in archives, museums, films, monuments, anniversaries, government policies, genealogy, etc. Practical application of historical skills and tools through communication with public historians, visits to local historic sites, and relevant assignments and experiential learning. Students will gain valuable experiences and knowledge related to a variety of areas where public history is practiced and be exposed to career opportunities in history.

  • HIST 512: Science & Technology in Global Perspective / 3 s.h.

    An examination of developments and events from 1600 to 1800 including religious wars, the witch craze, growth of absolutism and political rights, enlightened despots, movements within the church and the culture of the enlightenment. In addition wealth and poverty, social hierarchies, popular customs and culture, marriage, the family and gender will be examined.

  • HIST 515: Science and Religion from Copernicus to Creation Science / 3 s.h.

    During the current term, History 515 will examine the engagement of science and religion in western culture over the past five centuries. In 1896 Andrew Dickson White published his famous History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom, a work that helped establish the belief that science and religion were irreconcilable domains. This course examines the validity of that claim from the Copernican revolution in the sixteenth century to the rise of the modern Creation Science movement, and aims to place the relationship between science and faith in a mature historical, scientific and theological context.

  • HIST 521: Family, Gender and Power / 3 s.h.

    This course examines the historical development of the family beginning with the ancient world up to 1600. A central inquiry will be the formation of families and households, as well the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course will also explore the use of power and coercion in the organization of family. It will include an inquiry into contemporary gender theory but concentrate on the lives and ideas of actual persons insofar as the historical record reveals them.

  • HIST 522: History of the Family after 1600 / 3 s.h.

    This course examines the historical development of the family beginning from 1600 to the Twenty First Century.A central inquiry will be the formation of families and households, as well the impact of religion on gender and family roles.The course will also explore the use of power and coercion in the organization of family.It will include an inquiry into contemporary gender theory but concentrate on the lives and ideas of actual persons insofar as the historical record reveals them.

  • HIST 524: 19th Century Europe / 3 s.h.

    HIST 524 is a graduate-level course designed to survey a historical period in greater depth while introducing students to related primary and secondary sources. Students will be familiarized with major themes, events, and issues of interpretation in the history of European history during the nineteenth century from the French Revolution to the onset of the Great War. It explores key movements and themes in political, intellectual, gender,and socio-economic history through lectures, discussion groups, and the close readings of primary and secondary sources. Students will also consider various methodological and theoretical approaches that have influenced the way that modern historians have analyzed and explained this period in European history.

  • HIST 532: Issues in BC History / 3 s.h.

    This course will explore issues in the history of British Columbia from its earliest beginnings to the early 2000's. In particular, the course will explore the province's move from regionalism, to provincialism, to internationalism by examining many of the social, cultural, political and economic forces of change that shape the "West Beyond the West" in Canada. The lectures, readings and discussions will focus on specific aspects of B.C.'s history that particularly enlighten us about the character of the region, its unique place in Canadian history, and how these events have shaped the province today.

  • HIST 537: Canada and War in the 20th Century / 3 s.h.

    History 537 will survey the changing social, political and cultural impact of war on Canada in the twentieth century. The course will be divided into four sections – World War One, World War Two, the Cold War, and post-Cold War. In each section we will examine Canadian responses to war and warfare and the impact of those responses in shaping Canadian politics (both domestic and foreign policy), society, and culture. Topics to be covered will include defence, security and Canadian nationalism; the role of imperialism and continentalism in influencing Canadian identity and Canadian foreign policy; Canada as a ‘middle power’ and the shift to Canada as a ‘no power’; war and the changing role of women in Canadian society; and, the creation of Canadian military myths.

  • HIST 538: History of Religion in Canada / 3 s.h.

    Canada is sometimes regarded as a more secular version of its American neighbor. Henry Alline, the late eighteenth-century Nova Scotian revivalist, would not have agreed, for he believed that while Old and New England were engaged in a 'most inhuman war,' a great redeemer nation was emerging in his corner of British North America. This course examines 's rich Christian heritage from the first European encounters with aboriginal peoples to contemporary times, with particular emphasis on the relationship between Christianity and the broad socio-political and intellectual history of the nation.

  • HIST 540: Issues in First Nations - Canadian Relations / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine the history of First Nations in from pre-contact with Newcomers through to the present time.Broad economic, social and political themes that intersect with the history of 's original peoples will be covered including early encounters, fur trade economy, governmental policy, Christianity and culture, education, reservations and land claims.It will survey the major eras -- assimilation, protection, civilisation, marginalisation, and integration -- by specifically highlighting the observations and experiences of First Nations in Canada.

  • HIST 543: Medieval Europe 500-1250 / 3 s.h.

    An inquiry into the origins of European civilization.It examines what features from the ancient world survived the fall of Roman culture and the nature of the native Germanic and Slavic traditions. It looks at the way Christianity was received and altered. It looks at political, social, gender, and economic relationships and at the struggle between spiritual ideals on the one hand and traditional attitudes and material realities on the other.

  • HIST 547: History of Religion in the U.S. / 3 s.h.

    Writing in the 1830s Alex de Tocqueville noted the profound influence religion upon the American populace, arguing that ‘there are some who profess Christian dogmas because they believe them and others who do so because they are afraid to look as though they did not believe in them.So Christianity reigns without obstacles, by universal consent... .’[1]Even though (or perhaps because?) de Tocqueville was a citizen of , he was regarded by his contemporaries as one of the most insightful observers of the American character.At times, his comments continue to ring true, particularly with regard to the centrality of religious faith to the American experience.While not intended to be exhaustive, this course examines representative episodes in the history of religion in the , albeit largely in its Christian (and Protestant) form.

  • HIST 548: History of Religion in Canada / 3 s.h.

    Canada is sometimes regarded as a more secular version of its American neighbor. Henry Alline, the late eighteenth-century Nova Scotian revivalist, would not have agreed, for he believed that while Old and New England were engaged in a 'most inhuman war,' a great redeemer nation was emerging in his corner of British North America. This course examines Canada's rich Christian heritage from the first European encounters with aboriginal peoples to contemporary times, with particular emphasis on the relationship between Christianity and the broad socio-political and intellectual history of the nation.

  • HIST 561: History of Christianity I / 3 s.h.

    A study of the history of the Christian Church from the turn of the first century to the eve of the 16th century Reformation with attention to the persons, events, and issues involved in the major developments of Christianity.

  • HIST 562: History of Christianity II / 3 s.h.

    This course will explore issues in the history of British Columbia from its earliest beginnings to the early 2000's. In particular, the course will explore the province's move from regionalism, to provincialism, to internationalism by examining many of the social, cultural, political and economic forces of change that shape the "West Beyond the West" in Canada. The lectures, readings and discussions will focus on specific aspects of B.C.'s history that particularly enlighten us about the character of the region, its unique place in Canadian history, and how these events have shaped the province today.

  • HIST 581: Arab Middle East in the 20th Century / 3 s.h.

    This course examines some the major themes in the history of the Arab Middle East since the break up of the Ottoman Empire following World War I. Primary emphasis will be on the role played by issues of identity in the development of national structures in the Arab East (Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States). Major themes will include the nature of Islamic community, the structure and legacy of Ottoman rule, the post-Ottoman settlement and the impact of colonial rule, the emergence of nationalist politics and the growth of the contemporary Arab state system, oil and the politics of family rule in the Gulf States, and the relationship between religion and politics.

  • HIST 590: Canada and War in the 20th Century / 3 s.h.

    History 590 will survey the changing social, political and cultural impact of war on Canada in the twentieth century. The course will be divided into four sections – World War One, World War Two, the Cold War, and post-Cold War. In each section we will examine Canadian responses to war and warfare and the impact of those responses in shaping Canadian politics (both domestic and foreign policy), society, and culture. Topics to be covered will include defence, security and Canadian nationalism; the role of imperialism and continentalism in influencing Canadian identity and Canadian foreign policy; Canada as a ‘middle power’ and the shift to Canada as a ‘no power’; war and the changing role of women in Canadian society; and, the creation of Canadian military myths.

  • HIST 592: Sugar, Slaves & Silver / 3 s.h.

    This lecture/seminar course examines the Atlantic world during an era of immense global change that has shaped the world we live in today. The dramatic European navigations of the fifteenth century brought four continents and three races into interaction where there had been little or no communication before. Since the mid-fifteenth century, the Atlantic has been a corridor for fundamental exchanges of peoples, crops, technology and ideas. This course explores the origin and development of the Atlantic world. Topics include early maritime explorations, the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies, the labour migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the growth of mercantile capitalism and the establishment of an Atlantic economy, the maturation of Euro-American colonial societies and their struggles for autonomy and national independence.

  • HIST 600: CORE SEMINAR - History, Culture and Interpretation / 3 s.h.

    This course is designed to explore history as a discipline and a form of knowledge. It will examine the process and the structure of how human societies have interpreted, ordered and used historical inquiry. Major theoretical/philosophical traditions and their historians will be analyzed. Special attention will be paid to modern rational history with its focus on the notion of progress and the challenges brought about by the claims of post-modern interpretation-based history with its emphasis on language, race, ethnicity, gender and environment. Furthermore, we will explore history’s impact on other disciplines including philosophy, literary criticism, biology, physics and religious studies. The course will combine weekly readings with selected guest lectures that will explore the ways in which history is understood in History and in other disciplines.

  • HIST 606: History of the Family / 3 s.h.

    This course examines the historical development of the family beginning with the ancient world up to 1600. A central inquiry will be the formation of families and households, as well the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course will also explore the use of power and coercion in the organization of family. It will include an inquiry into contemporary gender theory but concentrate on the lives and ideas of actual persons insofar as the historical record reveals them.

  • HIST 607: Special Topics - History of the Metis in Canada / 3 s.h.

    This Directed Study explores the history of the Metis people in Canada over the past four centuries. More specifically, this course will aim: To provide an overview of the origins and development of the Metis in Canada as a distinct people; To develop awareness of historical challenges in Canada that are unique to Metis and aboriginal peoples; To explore and critique historical interpretations regarding the Metis; To develop skills of research, critical analysis and writing appropriate to a graduate-level standard.

  • HIST 607: Medieval Warfare / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine the social, economic, and political history of warfare from the fall of the Roman Empire to the fifteenth century. Several themes are emphasized: 1) the impact of technological developments in weaponry, fortifications, and armor on the conduct of war and society; 2) the influence of the Christian Church on warfare; 3) the relationship between social stratification and the conduct of war; and 4) the social consequences and economic costs of warfare.

  • HIST 607: Introduction to Patristics Study / 3 s.h.

    An introduction to the world and thought of the early Church fathers, roughly defined as churchmen who were active from the age of Clement of Rome (ca. 96 CE) to Augustine of Hippo (d. 430). Attention will be paid to the historical and liturgical context within which the fathers lived and ministered. The student will have the opportunity to focus on one father, or theological issue of his choice with the responsibility of fitting that father or issue into the wider context of his setting.

  • HIST 607: First Nations Canadians in BC / 3 s.h.

    This course is designed to expose the student to the historical context of many of the specific challenges facing the Aboriginal people living within British Columbia today. A broad historical basis for understanding many of the social issues facing First Nations today such sovereignty, conflicts over aboriginal rights and title, education, health and sexuality will be explored. A research project that combines the historical context of the Heiltsuk First Nation with specific emphasis on their traditional sexual mores and practices will be used to inform the on-going development of a sex education program that is being implemented into their communities.

  • HIST 607: History of Arian Theology / 3 s.h.

    An overview of the history of Arianism with a view toward discerning its influence in the early medieval age.

  • HIST 607: History of the Celtic Church / 3 s.h.

    This Directed Study explores the history of the Celtic Church between 400 and 1200 C.E. More specifically, this course will aim: To provide an overview of the introduction of Christianity into Celtic lands, including Patrick's mission and the ‘Golden Age' of monastic expansion in Ireland; To examine Celtic Christian culture and spiritual reform movements before the Viking invasions; To explore developments in the Celtic Church between the Viking invasion and the arrival of the Normans in the 12th century; To examine Celtic influences in the evangelization of Western Europe; To explore and critique historical interpretations regarding the Celtic Church; To develop skills of research, critical analysis and writing appropriate to a graduate-level standard.

  • HIST 610: Research Design/Bibliography Seminar / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • HIST 611/12: Thesis / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • HIST 613: Major Essay / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • HIST 619: The Renaissance Mind / 3 s.h.

    This graduate seminar will examine the period of transition and turmoil in European history from approximately 1350 to 1550 known as the Renaissance. As the cultural synthesis of the high middle ages was crumbling, poets, philosophers, artists, architects, theologians and statesmen in search of a fresh model for society rejected the late medieval scholastic worldview and embraced a new educational programme, the studia humanitatis, based on a reevaluation and revival of classical culture. This transition affected not only literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government, but virtually every other sphere of human activity. Therefore, this course, while providing an indepth, interdisciplinary introduction to the key topics of humanism, religion, political theory, and changes in high culture, will also investigate the issues of gender, economic development, and social history in general during this period. We will also assess different methodological approaches to the study of the Renaissance.

 

Philosophy

  • PHIL 510: Issues in Social Justice / 3 s.h.

    History 506 will survey the changing nature of and approaches to war and its effect on society from the Middle Ages to the present including an examination of various visions and proposals for peace. The course will include an assessment of relatively recent armed conflict in Africa, Central Europe and the Middle East, exploring the causes of contemporary conflict and some of its distinctive characteristics. We will also evaluate the effectiveness of various strategies for preventing, abating, and terminating current forms of conflict.

    Some of the questions we will discuss are: Why do states go to war? How do they create a lasting peace? What role does morality play in foreign policy? What is our obligation to just peace or just war?

  • PHIL 513: British Empiricism / 3 s.h.

    This course consists of a close read of substantial portions of the seminal writings of John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume, who are known for their articulation of empiricism in its classical form. The course includes a reading of a famous 20th century defense of empiricism, and a critic of the whole movement.

  • PHIL 514: Reason and Enlightenment / 3 s.h.

    This course will provide an overview of the ideas of three philosophers from the modern rationalistic tradition of the 17th century Enlightenment-Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. As we discuss each author's ideas, we will evaluate their positions on: the role of faith, the limits of reason, the existence of God, the divisibility of reality, the meaning of nature, and the ethics and politics of human life.

  • PHIL 515: Contemporary Political Philosophy / 3 s.h.

    In PHIL 515 students study selected texts by major contemporary political philosophers.

  • PHIL 520: Social and Political Philosophy / 3 s.h.

    This course shall provide an examination of foundational ideas and problems in the entire Western tradition of political philosophy.While undertaking close readings of major texts of this tradition, we shall discuss and evaluate the classical, medieval, and modern approaches to the state, the citizen, democracy, liberty, equality, authority, obligation, natural right, and disobedience.Finally, we shall understand the applicability of these ideas as Christians facing the challenges of the 21st century.

  • PHIL 521: Post-Modern Philosophy / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 550: Symbolic Logic / 3 s.h.

    This course acquaints students with the elements of symbolic logic and its methods of deduction, including: the quantificational calculus, definite descriptions, identity, and the logic of relations. The significance of symbolic logic is examined in relation to logical atomism as advanced early in the 20th century by Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell.

  • PHIL 560: Philosophy of Language / 3 s.h.

    This course will examine a range of topics within philosophy of language. There will be an overview of several works considered classics in the field (e.g. Wittgenstein, Quine, Searle, Alston, Grice), as well as critical review of major schools of thought in regard to language and criticism. Insights from linguistics and related disciplines, including textlinguistics and sociolinguistics, will be considered in evaluating the schools of thought.

  • PHIL 570: Epistemology / 3 s.h.

    A descriptive and critical inquiry into the theory of knowledge, including such topics as the problem of universals, criteria of truth, the possibility of synthetic a priori knowledge, skepticism and knowledge of the external world. Classical and contemporary readings.

  • PHIL 571: Aesthetics / 3 s.h.

    This course doesn’t merely sensitise students to the value, pleasures, and risks of the human imagination; it also explores different views on the nature, value, and meaning of artworks and of aesthetic experience. The first few weeks of the course will survey various notions of beauty and explore some of the reasons why beauty has became incidental to the arts and Aesthetics in general. We will then turn to Eaton’s book and begin examining some of the central philosophical notions and theories that are essential to an informed grasp of the field of Aesthetics. Next we will have class presentations on topics deriving from Higgin’s anthology, and finally I will offer a brief history of outlooks on the nature, value, and role of imagination in artistic creation.

  • PHIL 573: Reason and Belief in God / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 583: Religious Experience Seminar / 3 s.h.

    The purpose of this course is to examine the place of evidence in religion, and to develop tools for assessing the evidential force of religious experience and related phenomena. The main body of the course will address the evidential force of such experiences as near-death experiences, visions, mystical states of consciousness, as well as the Shroud of Turin as a unique religious artifact. The topics that have been selected have been the focus of either recent or on-going public attention.

    This course will introduce students to some of the figures that have contributed to the critical study of religious experience, e.g., William James, Rudolf Otto, and R.C. Zaehner, as well as to people who have described their experiences. It will critically examine competing theories for religious phenomena, e.g., psychological and neurophysiological explanations for near-death and visionary experiences. Although a number of the topics to be studied are of particular relevance to the Christian faith, their relevance to broader questions about God or a transcendent reality will also be considered.

  • PHIL 584: Philosophy of Religion / 3 s.h.

    This course examines some key issues pertaining to suffering and belief in God. Topics include the problem of evil, arguments from suffering original sin, everlasting suffering and providence.

  • PHIL 590: Philosophy of Mind / 3 s.h.

    What are we talking about when we speak of mind? What is the nature of the human mind? Does it even have a nature? Does it exist as something separate from the human brain? Is it a property of the human brain? Is it identical to the human brain? Or is it merely an abbreviated way of talking about bodily behaviours? More particularly, how is our phenomenologically rich and existentially weighted point of view on the world related to the neurophysiological conditions that underwrite it (or as one writer put it, “how is the water of the brain transubstantiated into the wine of consciousness?”)? And as Christians (if we are such), how does the way we understand the answers to these questions inform our belief that humans bear God’s image? Is dualism the only acceptable anthropological option for Christians? Or may a Christian believe that the mind is really merely an incredibly complex neurophysical entity (i.e., the brain) or just a vastly sophisticated computer? And how does theology bear on our understanding of our bodies’ relationship to our minds? God created human being by breathing into a handful of dust; He will resurrect our human bodies in the eschaton. What might this tell us about the bodily nature of our personal mindfulness? These are some of the more general issues we will be concerned with in this class.

    Given the centrality this course gives to class discussion and student presentations, its value is highly sensitive to student input. Since this course involves a rather large amount of reading, only students who are ready to invest the requisite energy and time should, in all fairness to fellow students, take this class.

  • PHIL 591: Existentialism / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 600 CORE SEMINAR - Core Issues in Philosophy / 3 s.h.

    Today, more than ever, the question of human nature is hotly contested. Not only are there many competing claims as to the nature of human being, there is no consensus on whether in fact humans possess an essential nature at all. This seminar is designed to examine some of the most influential views of human nature advanced by philosophers and scientists in the history of Western civilization, and to explore implications of these views for ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Plato and Aristotle are considered to have been seminal in shaping western views of human nature, and Christianity has drawn from ancient Greeks in articulating its own views. This backdrop to the modern period in philosophy will first be examined before moving into seminal views advanced in modernity and postmodernity. Among the latter will be both philosophical views and scientific views on human nature, views held by Rationalists, Kantians, Empiricists, Darwinians, Behaviorists, Existentialists, Marxists, Freudians, Pragmatists, Evolutionary Psychologists, Post-structuralists, and Transhumanists.

  • PHIL 601: Foundation of Ethics / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 603: Social Ethics Seminar / 3 s.h.

    This course is dedicated to examining ethical questions concerning life and death.Throughout the course, special emphasis will be placed on understanding and evaluating moral and legal perspectives on these questions, within the larger tradition of Western philosophy, and in the face of the current technological revolution.Issues will include: the moral status of humans, the meaning of personhood, sanctity of life versus quality of life, genetic engineering, reproductive technologies, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, abortion.Students are expected to read the assigned texts and prepare to discuss them before each class.

  • PHIL 604: Science and Religion Seminar / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 605: Philosophy of Body / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 606: Ethics and Politics / 3 s.h.

    This course is dedicated to examining the complex relation between political philosophy and timeless moral questions. While discussing major texts of political philosophy from antiquity to the present, we shall examine the philosophical rationale for the following issues: the ethical implications of church-state separation, the ancient-modern quarrel over the place of ethics in politics, the tension between “Athens” and “Jerusalem” over the meaning of political morality, the role of virtue in political leadership, and the “secularization” of biblical morality in modern politics.

  • PHIL 607: Special Topics - Medieval Cosmology / 3 s.h.

    This course presents a comprehensive understanding of the development of the notions of 3sign2 and 3nature2 in the evolution of the cosmological outlook of medieval worldviews. The Latin Age in philosophy is studied as beginning with Augustine's definition of signum and culminating in John Poinsot's Treatise on Signs. The semiotic developments of the Latin Age are placed in context by also studying how medieval cosmology views nature. Modern understandings of the nature of the universe are limited by modern notions of space and time and so this course explores the outlook of medieval cosmology on such topics in order to recover an understanding of naturans.

  • PHIL 607: Existence, Truth and Possibility / 3 s.h.

    Survey contemporary (i.e. late 20th-21st century) treatments of some core areas of philosophical investigation: namely, existence or being in its most basic categories, identity conditions for individual objects, truth, and modality (the nature of possibility and necessity).

  • PHIL 607: Neoplatonism and Early Christianity / 3 s.h.

    For better or worse, the respective fates of theology and philosophy have been inextricably linked since their convergence in the first few centuries A.D. What was the nature of this encounter? Did the early Christians overly correlate theological truth with Neoplatonic frameworks, as some recent advocates of "post-metaphysical" theology claim? How did the early Christian theorists understand the difference between Neoplatonic philosophy and revealed truth? This course will attempt to answer such questions through readings both in Neoplatonic philosophy and early Christian theory. Beginning with readings in Plotinus and Porphyry, the student will begin to form an understanding of the basic contours of Neoplatonic philosophy. The subsequent readings in Origen, Athanasius, and Augustine provide varying perspectives on how the Church Fathers made use of Greek philosophy in the service of faith. The Proclus reading will then provide an expression of mature Neoplatonism. The course will close by reading Aquinas' Commentary on the Book of Causes, which will provide a useful historical summary of the cumulative early Christian response to Neoplatonism. In sum, the purpose of this course is twofold: to familiarize the student with the key issues in Neoplatonic philosophy, as well as to locate key points at which the early Christian thinkers diverged/assimilated Neoplatonic philosophy.

  • PHIL 610: Research Design/Seminar / 3 s.h.

    Under the direction of the student’s approved thesis advisor, a course of reading and study which leads to the development of both a significant bibliographical essay (or annotated bibliography) and a thesis proposal. The latter includes at least the following: major question(s) to be addressed; significance of the issue(s); methodologies to be used; theories to be addressed and primary sources to be examined.

  • PHIL 611/12: Thesis / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 613: Major Essay / 3 s.h.

    No course description available.

  • PHIL 621: Philosophical Perspectives on Religious Pluralism / 3 s.h.

    This course surveys and engages central philosophical issues relevant to assessing normative religious pluralism.

  • PHIL 645: Philosophy and Religion / 3 s.h.

    Explores the foundations of religious belief and faith, particularly the issue of the rationality of religion. The role of methodology is examined, including the value of deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning; also the question whether the method applicable to religious belief is unique to it. The work of recent philosophical theologians and their critics is examined and evaluated.

 

ENGL/HIST/PHIL 610/611/612/613 may be taken any semester.

610 the Research Design / Bibliography course must be completed and permission given by your supervisor before moving on to either 611 (Thesis I) or 613 (Major Paper).

ENGL/HIST/PHIL 607 Special Topics (Directed Studies) may be taken after consultation with your academic advisor and individual professors. Begin discussions with your professors and have the paperwork completed early.

Directed Study 607 Listing


Summer Courses

Get full credit in a condensed time frame with our on-campus summer courses. Course offerings for summer 2015 are:

HIST 561      HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY
Dr. Craig Allert
April 27 - May 15 (MTThF  8:30 - 11:30 am)

ENGL 591     CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Dr. Monika Hilder
April 27 - May 15 (MTThF 8:30 am - 11:30 am)

ENGL 600      CORE ENGLISH SEMINAR
Dr. Holly Nelson
July 6 - 17  (Monday - Friday 11:00 am - 2:00 pm)

Housing

If you live outside of the Fraser Valley, there are a number of options for housing during summer sessions. You could make your own living arrangements in the Langley area or stay right here on the TWU campus. Costs for living on campus are approximately $ 250 per week for a single bedroom suite and $175 per week for a two bedroom suite. There is a $50 charge for any additional nights beyond regular session dates. Please use this link to the Summer Grad Housing application.

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