Announcements

 

The TWU Wellness Centre will beclosed effective April 29th

We will open on August 1st with clinical services resuming on August 15th.

For Wellness Services During The Summer Months:Health Services:

For on campus FIRST AID call  (#2099) or 604-513-2121, ext. 2099 

For Medical Emergencies call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital, Langley Memorial Hospital located at 22051 Fraser Highway.

 Nearest local medical clinics:

 Grove Medical Centre

401 – 21183 – 88 Ave (6 minutes from TWU)

604-882-1250

Mon. - Fri. 8 AM – 9 PM

Weekends/holidays 10 AM – 5 PM

 Glover Medical Clinic

101 – 5796 Glover Rd (9 minutes from TWU)

604-530-3233

Mon. – Thurs. 8 AM – 8 PM  Fri. – 8 AM – 5 PM

Weekends/holidays 9 AM – 5 PM

 Willoughby Medical Centre

20202 66 Ave (9 minutes from TWU)

604-514-8800

Mon. – Thurs. 9 AM – 9 PM

Fri. 9 AM – 7 PM

Weekends/holiday10 AM – 6 PM

 Langley Public Health

20389 Fraser Hwy, Langley, BC V3A 7N2

(604) 539-2900

For non-emergency medical advice call 811 for Healthlink BC or visit www.healthlinkbc.ca

For other Health Service inquiries contactmichele.regehr@twu.ca

For Health Insurance questions contactSandy.Schellenberg@twu.ca

Counselling Services:

For Counselling Emergencies:

Please call the 24 hour crisis line at 604-951-8855. If you need urgent help, call 911

For Non-Emergency Counselling:

We recommend contacting Mark Eshleman in his private practice: www.cedarspringscounselling.com. For other Registered Clinical Counsellors please refer to the BCACC website:  http://bc-counsellors.org/

 For other Counselling Service inquiries contactshawna.medley@twu.ca

 Equity of Access and Learning Resources:

 Equity of Access Office: The Equity of Access Office will continue to serve students registered in Spring and Summer classes. Please arrange appointments ahead of time due to reduced availability. 

 Academic Coaching: The Academic Coaches are employed during the Fall and Winter semesters and consequently will not be available during the Spring and Summer. Please contact Dave Stinson if you have any questions. (local 3404, stinson@twu.ca)

 Writing Centre: Writing Centre appointments will continue to be available on a limited basis through the Spring and Summer by booking on-line using the Student Portal. Tutoring appointments move to the Northwest Building during the Spring and Summer.

 Rec Services:

 All programs (clubs, club teams, intramurals, fitness classes, etc.) provided by Rec Services wrap up at the end of April. There is no programming over the summer months. Fall offerings will start in September. If you have any questions please contact Mike Teeter (local 3441, michael.teeter@twu.ca

 

 

April 22, 2016

UPDATED ZIKA VIRUS GLOBAL UPDATE  FROM GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

 

Travel Health Notice

Zika virus infection is caused by a virus which is primarily spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be transmitted by an infected pregnant woman to her developing baby and sexually transmitted by an infected man to his partner. Symptoms can include fever, headache, conjunctivitis (pink eye) and skin rash, along with joint and muscle pain. The illness is typically mild and lasts only a few days and the majority of those infected do not have symptoms. There is no vaccine or medication that protects against Zika virus infection.

Zika virus is occurring in many regions of the world. Local transmission of Zika virus was first reported in the Americas in 2015. Currently there is ongoing local transmission in many countries of South Asia, Western Pacific Islands, and South and Central America, including the Caribbean, and Mexico.

In addition, Brazil has reported a significant increase in the number of newborns with microcephaly (abnormally small head) and a number of countries have reported an increase in the number of cases of Guillain-Barre Syndrome, a neurological disorder. Experts now agree that Zika virus infection causes both of these disorders.

There have been travel-related cases of Zika virus reported in Canada in returned travellers from countries with ongoing Zika virus outbreaks.

On March 8, 2016 the World Health Organization declared that the clusters of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders, continues to constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that pregnant women and those planning a pregnancy avoid travel to countries with ongoing Zika virus outbreaks. All travellers should protect themselves from mosquito bites. For additional recommendations please see the section below.

For the latest updates on countries affected by Zika virus, please visit the Public Health Agency of Canada's list of countries with reported locally acquired Zika virus.

This travel health notice will be updated as more information becomes available.

Recommendations

Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.

 

  • Pregnant women and those planning a pregnancy should avoid travel to countries with ongoing Zika virus outbreaks.
    • If travel cannot be avoided or postponed strict mosquito bite prevention measures should be followed due to the association between Zika virus infection and increased risk of serious health effects on their unborn baby.
  • Travellers returning from countries with ongoing Zika virus outbreaks:
    • For pregnant women, if you develop symptoms that could be consistent with Zika virus infection, you should consult a health care provider. 
    • For women planning a pregnancy, it is strongly recommended that you wait at least two months before trying to conceive to ensure that any possible Zika virus infection has cleared your body.
    • For male travellers, Zika virus can persist for an extended period of time in the semen of infected males, therefore
      • It is strongly recommended that, if you have a pregnant partner, you should use condoms for the duration of the pregnancy.
      • It is strongly recommended that you and your partner wait to conceive for six months by using a condom.
      • It is recommended that you should consider using condoms with any partner for six months.
  • Travellers should protect themselves from mosquito bites at all times, as the Zika virus is transmitted by a mosquito that can bite in daylight and evening hours. These mosquitoes generally do not live or transmit disease at elevations above 2,000 meters. A list of how to prevent insect bites is available on the Government of Canada's website.
  • Most people who have Zika virus illness will have mild symptoms that resolve with simple supportive care. If you are pregnant, or you have underlying medical conditions, or you develop more serious symptoms that could be consistent with Zika virus infection, you should see a health care provider and tell them where you have been travelling or living.

 

 

Feb, 22, 2016

ZIKA VIRUS

Dear campus community,

 

The Zika virus, which is currently circulating in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific, has received a great deal of media attention lately. The virus may be a new risk for anyone travelling to these regions, especially pregnant women or those considering becoming pregnant.

 

The only cases of Zika virus reported in Canada have been travel-related. There have been no reported cases of locally acquired Zika virus. The type of mosquito that is known to spread the virus to humans is not found in Canada. 

 

There is currently no vaccine against the Zika virus; however, efforts to make one have begun.

 

Symptoms can include fever, headache, conjunctivitis (red eyes) and rash, along with joint and muscle pain. The illness lasts only a few days.

 

Trinity Western University’s recommendation for students and staff travelling to affected areas is to follow the Public Health Agency of Canada’s recommendations. This level-two advisory for Canadians planning to travel to the affected areas says the following:

  • Before you travel (preferably six weeks prior), consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bitesat all times, as the Zika virus is transmitted by a mosquito that can bite in daylight and evening hours. Prevention measures include using insect repellent and bed nets, and wearing long-sleeved, loose-fitting shirts tucked into long pants as well as a hat. Additional measures include staying in screened or air conditioned rooms. For more information, visit this webpage on insect bite prevention.
  • Pregnant women and those considering becoming pregnant should discuss their risk with a health care provider and consider postponing travel to areas where the Zika virus is circulating. If travel cannot be postponed, strict mosquito bite prevention measures should be followed due to the possible association between Zika virus infection and increased risk of serious health effects on unborn babies.
  • If you develop symptoms similar to Zika virus infection while you are travelling or after you return, see a health care provider and tell them where you have been travelling or living.

 FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT THESE RELIABLE RESOURCES:

Thank you for your attention to this matter. We wish everyone safe travels during the upcoming reading break. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.

Michele Regehr, RN, BN

Assistant Director of Wellness Centre and Campus Nurse Wellness Centre

Trinity Western University I t: 604.513.2121 (3611) I f: 604.513.2041 I e: michele.regehr@twu.ca

​​