Trinity Western University

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Academic Events

Events this Week

Monday, October 20th - Friday, November 14th

Exhibition - Moiré Studies: beauty in the unexpected
A digital screen-print exhibition by Laurie Culshaw, SAMC Art + Design

Time: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Location: President’s Gallery, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre

TWU's School of the Arts, Media + Culture is proud to host this collection of works by Laurie Culshaw, our newest Art + Design instructor. Laurie is an innovative graphic designer and artist. Her first exhibition on campus is an experimental screen-print series exploring the visual distortion of digital moiré patterns. Walk through this free exhibit and discover these "happy accidents" of colours and patterns carefully aligned and overlaid. There is beauty in the unexpected.

For more information contact Diana Squires at samc@twu.ca.

Tuesday, October 21st

The Royal Society of Canada's Romanowski Lecture Series
Dr. Jon Giesy - "Toxicological Evaluation of Perfluorooctane (Pfos) in the Environment: Anatomy of an Environmental Issue"

Time: 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Location: Auditorium, Northwest Building

Abstract: Prof. Giesy has affected your life and that of every living thing on the planet. This is the story of how he applied state of the art chemical methods of mass spectrometry and molecular biology to determine the status and trends of concentrations in the environment and worked out the mechanisms of toxicity and thresholds for effects. Ultimately, through a global assessment of risk the chemicals were banned. This is the scientific and political story of how a very valuable chemical used in many processes was ultimately banned and the public hardly knew anything had happened. By using a combination of chemistry and biology and ultimately developing a substitute I was able to get a chemical with a bad environmental profile out of the environment and you can still buy all of the electronics that affect our lives on a daily basis. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) has been found in tissues of humans and wildlife species in many parts of the world. Because of its low vapor pressure and the fact that it was used in polymers that were thought to be inert it was not expected to move in the environment or be accumulated into animals. Furthermore, accurate and sensitive analytical methods were unavailable until they were developed by my group. For these reasons little information on the environmental fate of PFOS was available. Here, I present the story of how I discovered this chemical in the environment, and then conducted a global survey and worked out the mechanism of action and thresholds for toxicity. I will provide chemical-physical properties of PFOS and discuss how it is different from more traditionally studied neutral, di-aromatic halogenated compounds. I will discuss the reasons for why this global catastrophe occurred through a failure to understand the chemistry and toxicology of a whole class of chemicals. It was a failure of science and policies and ultimately discovered through serendipity. A series of controlled laboratory studies were conducted to determine the toxicity of PFOS to aquatic organisms, birds and mammals. From this information threshold concentrations for the protection of aquatic life were developed. By using toxicity information for mammals and birds toxicity reference values were developed based on concentrations in tissues, including liver, blood plasma and eggs were developed, By applying bioaccumulation factors, concentrations of PFOS in water predicted to protect predatory birds and mammals were also determined. Concentrations of PFOS in waters and tissues of different species from different habitats, eco-regions and trophic levels were determined and compared to the threshold values to determine the margin of safety of current concentrations of PFOS in a range of environments. Specifically, the risk assessment of mixtures of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) will be discussed and the potential of developing a toxic equivalency approach will be presented. FFOS and chemicals that degrade to PFOS are now listed in Appendix B of the Stockholm Protocol and 87 chemicals are now banned in Canada. Concentrations of PFOS in the environment are declining.

Bio: Professor John P. Giesy is a world leading eco-toxicologist and environmental chemist with interests in many aspects of eco-toxicology, including both fates and effects of potentially toxic compounds. His studies include both laboratory and field as well as mesocosm studies and apply tools from molecular biology to ecosystem-level. He discovered the phenomenon of photo enhanced toxicity of organic compounds, such as PAHs. He was the first to report the occurrence of perfluorinated compounds in the environment.

He obtained a B.S. Degree, Summa cum laude with honors in Biology from Alma College, M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Limnology from Michigan State University in 1971 and 1974, respectively. He was a professor in the Institute of Ecology and Zoology Department at the University of Georgia for 8 years and then on the faculty of Michigan State University for 26 years where he achieved the rank of Distinguished Professor of Zoology and is now Emeritus. Currently, he is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan where he is on the faculties of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre. He is also Distinguished Visiting Professor of Biology & Chemistry, at City University of Hong Kong, Concurrent Professor of Environmental Science at Nanjing University, China, Visiting Professor at Xiamen University, Honorary Professor of Biological Science at the University of Hong Kong, and Visiting Professor at the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in the Division of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Discipline of Earth Sciences in the National Academy of Science. He is included in 40 biographical listings, including Who’s Who in Canada, Who's Who in America, and Who’s Who in the World. In 2012 he was rated the No. 1 environmental scientist in Canada by the Globe and Mail Newspaper.

He is also the recipient of many awards including: Willard F. Shepard Award from the Michigan Water Pollution Control Assoc; Vollenweider Medal for Aquatic Sciences from the National Water Research Institute of Canada; Distinguished Alumni Award from Alma College; Sir E.W. Russell Award in the Sciences from the British Soil Science Society; Einstein Professor Award from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is a charter member and has served on the Board of Directors of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) from 1986 until 1992 and as President of the Great Lakes Regional chapter in 1984 and President of the international organization in 1990-1991. He has received 3 major SETAC awards; the Founders Award, which is the highest award; Environmental Education Award and Global Capacity Building Award.

He has published 966 peer-reviewed works and presented 1,520 lectures. He is a highly cited author and is among the top 0.001% of active authors in the world (ISI) and the most cited author in the world in the combined fields of Ecology and Environmental Sciences with an Hirsch (H) index of 94 (Google Scholar®: based on over 950 publications with over 36,879 citations to his works. His i10 Index (number of papers cited more than 10 times) is 528.

Tuesday, October 21st - Saturday, October 25th

SAMC Theatre - The Illusion

Time: Tuesday - Saturday 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Saturday Matinee 2:00 - 4:00 pm
Location: Freedom Hall, Robert N. Thompson Centre
Cost: Adults $16-$18, Seniors $13-$15, Students $13-$15
Special rates: Discounted Tuesdays & matinees! TWU Alumni receive the student discount.
Tickets: www.twu.ca/theatre or 604-513-2121 ext. 3872

Magic. Revenge. Forgiveness.

A desperate father visits the cave of a disgraced magician who can show him the life of his prodigal son, lost for 15 years. But where is the line between dream and reality? Can a vision so beautiful, so heroic, soften a heart of stone?

Step into a fairy tale where truth mingles with illusion...where scheming desire battles true love...where the iron force of law meets the power of forgiveness. Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner’s adaptation of this 17th Century comedy is a profoundly poetic spectacle full of witty, contemporary surprises.

This is the TWU directing debut of SAMC Theatre’s newest faculty member, Kate Muchmore. Get details of all the shows this season at www.twu.ca/theatre.

Also showing Tuesday, October 27th to Saturday, November 1st. For more information contact Diana Squires at Diana.Squires@twu.ca.

Wednesday, October 22nd

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Dr. Stephen E. Fowl, Professor of Theology, Loyola College of Maryland - "Historical Criticism, Theological Interpretation and the Ends of the Christian Life"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Auditorium, Northwest Building

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: The past 20 years have witnessed a robust renewal of interest in reading Scripture theologically. This paper will trace out some of the reasons for this renewal. It will then consider three issues that seem to demand the attention of theological interpreters. The first looks at the pressure to come up with a clear definition of what constitutes theological interpretation. The second argues that the time is no ripe for a less fevered evaluation of the relationships between theological interpretation and the practices of historical criticism. Finally, I will raise this question: if theological interpretation is to flourish into the future, how will future theological interpreters be formed?

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Science and Christianity: A Guest Lecture
Jonathan Baker - "What mean these stones?: Adventures in blogging about Young-Earth Creationism"

Time: 7:30 - 9:00 pm
Location: Room 125, Robert N. Thompson Centre

Abstract: According to recent polls, approximately one third of the U.S. population accepts Young-Earth Creationism (YEC) in some form, and nearly one half rejects biological evolution. Despite rapid advances in the Earth and life sciences, however, these percentages have not declined appreciably in at least two decades. Efforts to curb the growth and influence of YEC, particularly in American politics and education, have typically focused on better educating the public about evolutionary theory and common descent—the primary polemical targets of creation ministries. These counter-movements have had little impact on the creationist community, because the modern ‘creation science’ movement was facilitated largely by the work of Morris and Whitcomb (1961), whose foremost goal was to reinvent the framework in which geological evidences were interpreted. If the Earth is less than 10,000 years old, then biological evolution and common descent cannot possibly account for the diversity of life on Earth, especially human beings. Even today, the success of Answers in Genesis owes much to staff geologists like Steven Austin, Andrew Snelling, and Michael Oard. Holding doctoral degrees in geology, these authors have built an article database that has been all but canonized by YECs across the world, including many churches. Despite operating within a discipline unrecognizable to 99% of the world’s geologists, so-called “Flood geologists” boast an unrivaled authority among YECs and thus are free to publish their research without subjecting it to peer-review or criticism. In response, various groups and individual bloggers have committed themselves to the critical task of holding Answers in Genesis responsible for their scientific claims, but it is unclear to what extent these minor voices are effective in a debate long settled within academia. In addition to correcting the misinformation spread by creation ministries, however, such critiques have elucidated the cunning means by which the young-Earth movement continues to grow today. Facebook event page: http://goo.gl/ixkKtR

Speaker: Jonathan Baker, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas Ph.D. candidate in Geoscience (expecting to graduate May 2015). Academic experience as a field and laboratory researcher in sedimentary geochemistry, paleoceanography, and paleoclimatology in the western US and Russia. Experience building international collaborations, through which his research currently focuses on the use of stable-isotope records in secondary cave formations and lake sediments to reconstruct Holocene climate dynamics over continental Eurasia. Recent Fulbright recipient (2012–2013), through which he carried out this research in the Russian Federation. Blogs at http://ageofrocks.org/.

Sponsored by the Canadian Scientific and Christian Affiliation, Vancouver Area Science & Religion Forum, GEOL 109 class. For more information contact Dr. Arnold Sikkema at Arnold.Sikkema@twu.ca.

Thursday, October 23rd

Greek Discourse and Syntax - Guest Lecture
Dr. Steve Runge, Scholar-in-Residence at Logos Bible Software - "Historical Development & Function of the Greek Article"

Time: 8:30 - 9:40 am
Location: Room 130/131, Fosmark Centre
Registration: by October 21st, click here to register, seating is limited

Sponsored by the TWU Graduate Student Association, presented and subsidized by Northwest Baptist Seminary.

For more information contact Dianne Gleave at dianne.gleave@twu.ca or 604-888-7592.

Greek Discourse and Syntax - Guest Lecture
Dr. Steve Runge, Scholar-in-Residence at Logos Bible Software - "Exceptive/Restrictive Clauses in the NT"

Time: 10:00 - 11:15 am
Location: Room 130/131, Fosmark Centre
Registration: by October 21st, click here to register, seating is limited

Sponsored by the TWU Graduate Student Association, presented and subsidized by Northwest Baptist Seminary.

For more information contact Dianne Gleave at dianne.gleave@twu.ca or 604-888-7592.

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Dr. Stephen E. Fowl, Professor of Theology, Loyola College of Maryland - Lunch discussion

Time: 11:40 am - 12:50 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Greek Discourse and Syntax - Guest Lecture
Dr. Steve Runge, Scholar-in-Residence at Logos Bible Software - "Discourse Function of the Perfect Indicative in Romans & Hebrews"

Time: 12:00 - 1:30 pm
Location: Room 130/131, Fosmark Centre
Cost: $2 if having lunch
Registration: by October 21st, click here to register, seating is limited

Sponsored by the TWU Graduate Student Association, presented and subsidized by Northwest Baptist Seminary.

For more information contact Dianne Gleave at dianne.gleave@twu.ca or 604-888-7592.

Graduate Biblical Forum
Dr. Stephen Fowl, Professor, Department of Theology, Loyola University Maryland - "Simeon in Acts 15:14:  Simon Peter and Echoes of Simeons Past"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre

Paper will be circulated in advance, summarized, and discussed. Copy available from abegg@twu.ca. For more information, contact Dr. Martin Abegg at abegg@twu.ca.

Friday, October 24th

Thesis Defence - Master of Arts in Linguistics
A. Chantel Vanderveen - "A Phonology of Stau"

Time: 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Location: Room 106, Northwest Building

Abstract: This thesis is a description of the phonology of Stau, a Rgyalrongic language of the Tibeto-Burman family, based on original field research. Stau is spoken by approximately 23,000 people in the west of Sichuan province, China. It is an almost unstudied language. Apart from a sketch of the phonology and grammar by Huang (1991), which provides a phonetic (rather than phonemic) analysis of Stau sounds, lists attested onsets and rhymes, and discusses tone, there has been virtually no systematic study of the phonology of language. This thesis provides a more extensive study of Stau phonology, covering segmental phonology, acoustic analysis of stops and of vowels, syllable structure, phonotactics, phonological processes, and pitch phenomena.

Of particular interest in this phonology are Stau’s large phonemic inventory of forty-two consonants and eight vowels, its large syllable canon which allows onset clusters of up to three consonants and single coda consonants, phonotactic constraints among its consonant clusters, and vowel changes in reduplication.

Anabaptist-Mennonite Centre for Faith and Learning Inaugural Lecture

Time: 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Location: Cafeteria, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: liz.robertson@twu.ca by Monday, October 20th

The Mennonite Faith and Learning Society warmly invites you to a dessert reception and program to celebrate the launch of the Anabaptist-Mennonite Centre for Faith and Learning at Trinity Western University.

Opening remarks from TWU President Bob Kuhn.
Dr. John H. Redekop, "Why This Centre?"
Centre Director, Dr. Myron A. Penner, "16th Century Perspectives on 21st Century Issues."
Choral music by singers from the TWU Masterworks and Chamber Choirs.

Friday, October 24th - Saturday, October 25th

MinistryLift Equipping Conference

Time: 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
Location: Fosmark Centre
Cost: Early bird onsite registration is $45/one day or $75/both days (until Sept. 30). Live-streaming is $35/both days. Use promo code TWU to get 10% off
Registration: www.ministrylift.ca/equipping2014 by October 23, 2014

Presenters include Dr. Alvin Vander Griend (author of seven books on prayer), Ken Dyck (Founder and International Director of Freedom Session), Derek Ross (Director of Legal Affairs for the Canadian Council of Charities), Nikki White (Prayer Ministry Trainer), John Wassen (professional counselor with New Life Counselling Clinic), Ron Toews and his team from Leaders2Learners, David and Melissa McVety (Associate Director at Doing Family Right), Brent and Nikki Lanigan (Children’s Ministry specialists) and a host of others with expertise and passion that they will bring to the conference.

Take your walk with God and service to Him to the next level by attending this year's MinistryLift Equipping Conference. We have 13 confirmed equipping tracks with four workshops in each track:

Friday Tracks - Christianity and Culture, ChurchWorks Church Administration, Healing Discipleship, Leadership Essentials 1, Prayer, Rural Ministry, and Worship Ministry

Saturday Tracks - Authentic Leadership, Children's Ministry, Coaching/Mentoring, Leadership Essentials 2, Marriage and Family, Personal Health

Onsite participants can register for one or both days (live-streaming participants have one fee for both days).

For more information contact Randy Wollf at randy.wollf@twu.ca.

Saturday, October 25th

Chamber Singers Concert - "SHINE"

Time: 7:30 - 9:00 pm
Location: Langley Mennonite Fellowship, 20997 40 Ave, Langley
Cost: Adults $10, Seniors $10, Students “pay what you can”

Trinity Western University’s new Director of Choral Activities Dr. Joel Tranquilla leads off his first concert with an hour-long evening SAMC Chamber Singers performance titled “SHINE.” This first performance by the Chamber Singers by themselves features sacred music by Palestrina, Handel, James MacMillan, and David Squires, as well as a Bach cantata based on the familiar chorale tune “Nun danket alle Gott” (“Now Thank We All Our God”). Join our students and colleagues as they sing songs, hymns, and spiritual songs that speak about the True Light.

This concert will also be performed on Saturday, November 1st in Delta. See that date for details. For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Coming Events in October

Tuesday, October 27th - Saturday, November 1st

SAMC Theatre - The Illusion

Time: Tuesday - Saturday 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Saturday Matinee 2:00 - 4:00 pm
Location: Freedom Hall, Robert N. Thompson Centre
Cost: Adults $16-$18, Seniors $13-$15, Students $13-$15
Special rates: Discounted Tuesdays & matinees! TWU Alumni receive the student discount.
Tickets: www.twu.ca/theatre or 604-513-2121 ext. 3872

Magic. Revenge. Forgiveness.

A desperate father visits the cave of a disgraced magician who can show him the life of his prodigal son, lost for 15 years. But where is the line between dream and reality? Can a vision so beautiful, so heroic, soften a heart of stone?

Step into a fairy tale where truth mingles with illusion...where scheming desire battles true love...where the iron force of law meets the power of forgiveness. Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner’s adaptation of this 17th Century comedy is a profoundly poetic spectacle full of witty, contemporary surprises.

This is the TWU directing debut of SAMC Theatre’s newest faculty member, Kate Muchmore. Get details of all the shows this season at www.twu.ca/theatre.

Also showing Tuesday, October 21st - Saturday, October 25th. For more information contact Diana Squires at Diana.Squires@twu.ca.

Thursday, October 30th

Public Forum
Paul Liu - "Religion and Rule of Law in China Today"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Auditorium, Northwest Building

Mr. Paul Liu is a long-time friend of TWU and is well-known in China for his expertise on religion and society, comparative state-religion relations, as well as religion and rule of law. He is the founder of the Pu Shi Institute of Social Sciences, which was established in 1999 as an independent, non-profit, non-governmental think-tank dedicated to the protection of religious freedom in China. Liu is also the creator of a Chinese website, “Pu Shi Research for Social Science” on religion, politics, and law.

Liu was a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of American Studies, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences from 1991-2012. He has been a visiting scholar at Rutgers University, Georgetown University, and the University of Notre Dame. Liu also serves as Affiliate Fellow at the Emory University Center for the Study of Law and Religion and the Brigham Young University International Centre for Law and Religion Studies.

Liu’s other research partners have included China Minzu University’s Institute of Philosophy and Religion, Fudan University, CASS Institute of World Religions, Peking University Law School, Southwest University of Politics and Law School, Shantou University Law School, and Communication University of China.

Liu’s main works include, Religion in Contemporary America (Beijing, 2001, second edition 2012; Hanoi 2009); Religion and U.S. Civil Society (Beijing, 2004); and Nation, Religion, Law (Beijing, 2006). Liu is considered one of the most influential advocates for the religious freedom and rule of law in China.

 

Coming Events in November

Saturday, November 1st

Chamber Singers Concert - "SHINE"

Time: 7:30 - 9:00 pm
Location: South Delta Baptist Church, 1988 56 St, Delta
Cost: Adults $10, Seniors $10, Students “pay what you can”

Trinity Western University’s new Director of Choral Activities Dr. Joel Tranquilla leads off his first concert with an hour-long evening SAMC Chamber Singers performance titled “SHINE.” This first performance by the Chamber Singers by themselves features sacred music by Palestrina, Handel, James MacMillan, and David Squires, as well as a Bach cantata based on the familiar chorale tune “Nun danket alle Gott” (“Now Thank We All Our God”). Join our students and colleagues as they sing songs, hymns, and spiritual songs that speak about the True Light.

This concert will also be performed on Saturday, October 25th in Langley. See that date for details. For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Wednesday, November 12th

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Dr. Christopher Seitz, Senior Research Fellow, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto - "A Canonical Reading of Ecclesiastes"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Auditorium, Northwest Building

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: We will look at the following topics. 1. The unusual character of the protagonist’s depiction as “Koheleth” and its significance for the interpretation of the book. 2. The repeated use of the phrase hebel and how best to translate it, given its obvious thematic importance. 3. The use of proverbs in Ecclesiastes and what this says about its relationship to Wisdom. 4. Whether there is a dramatic movement to the book that tells us how to understand its more limited stance toward Wisdom? 5. The canonical location of Ecclesiastes in various Jewish and Christian lists and the significance of this for proper interpretation of the book.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Thursday, November 13th

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Dr. Christopher Seitz, Senior Research Fellow, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto - Lunch discussion

Time: 11:40 am - 12:50 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Gender Café - "Generous Spaciousness: Responding to Gay Christians in the Church" (based on the 2014 book of the same name)
Facilitator: Wendy VanderWal Gritter, Executive Director of New Direction Ministries

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Suggestion (not required): Read the book before the cafe.

Wendy VanderWal Gritter (MDiv, Tyndale Seminary) is the author of Generous Spaciousness: Responding to Gay Christians in the Church, executive director of New Direction Ministries of Canada in Mississauga, Ontario, and an internationally recognized contributor to conversations about faith and sexuality.

FREE! All welcome.

Thursday, November 20th

Faculty ProD Workshop - "Preston Manning and Centre for Mennonite Faith & Learning"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

For TWU/ACTS faculty only.

Friday, November 21st

Concert Band + Orchestra

Time: 7:30 - 9:30 pm
Location: Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 20097 72nd Ave, Langley
Cost: Admission by donation ($10 suggested)

For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Saturday, November 22nd

Concert Band + Orchestra

Time: 7:30 - 9:30 pm
Location: Peace Lutheran Church, 2029 Ware St, Abbotsford
Cost: Admission by donation ($10 suggested)

For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Wednesday, November 26th

Chamber Music Night

Time: 7:30 - 9:30 pm
Location: Instrumental Hall, Music Building
Cost: Admission by donation ($5 suggested)

For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Sunday, November 30th

Christmas at the Chan

Time: 2:30 - 4:30
Location: Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road, UBC, Vancouver
Cost: Orchestra Level $25, Everywhere else $22.50
Tickets: tickets.ubc.ca

In his first season at the helm of SAMC’s choral program, award-winning conductor Dr. Joel Tranquilla brings together four choirs and full orchestra in an exquisite program spanning centuries of Christmas music. Join us for a glorious Advent celebration as we anticipate the coming of Christ with joy and wonder.

Our annual Christmas at the Chan Centre concert is a collaborative gift to the wider community from the Chan family, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, and Trinity Western University, and is made possible through the generous assistance of the Chan Endowment Fund of the University of British Columbia.

For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Coming Events in December

Wednesday, December 3rd

Jazz Night

Time: 7:30 - 9:30 pm
Location: Instrumental Hall, Music Building
Cost: Admission by donation ($5 suggested)

For more information contact Shayna Leenstra at shayna.leenstra@twu.ca.

Coming Events in January

Thursday, January 15th

Full Professor Inaugural Lecture - David Squires

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

Reception to follow.

Thursday, January 22nd

Faculty ProD Workshop - "Family in the classroom"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

For TWU/ACTS faculty only.

Coming Events in February

Thursday, February 12th

Faculty ProD Workshop - "International Students in the Classroom"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

For TWU/ACTS faculty only.

Coming Events in March

Thursday, March 5th

Faculty ProD Workshop - "Faculty and the New Era 2: Keeping the conversation going"

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

For TWU/ACTS faculty only.

Thursday, March 12th

Full Professor Inaugural Lecture - Dennis Venema

Time: 1:10 - 2:25 pm
Location: Alumni Hall, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre
RSVP: Colleen Hansen at Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

Reception to follow.

 

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