Trinity Western University

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Academic Events

Events this Week

Monday, September 15th - Friday, October 3rd

The Art of Li Guijin: Prints + Drawings
Li Guijin, guest artist hosted by SAMC Art + Design

Time: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Location: President’s Gallery, 2nd floor, Reimer Student Centre

TWU’s School of the Arts, Media + Culture is proud to host this collection of works by Li Guijin, Professor and graduate supervisor of Tianjin Normal University. Professor Li is the Director of Tianjin Artists Association and his work has been exhibited across Asia, Europe, and North America.

Professor Li’s prints and drawings are full of passion and dignity, showing strong national and local character. His works are grounded in Chinese tradition while drawing inspiration from modern painting and exploring new techniques in printmaking. This public exhibition and Artist Talk provide a platform for Chinese and Canadian artistic and educational exchange.

For more information contact Diana Squires at samc@twu.ca.

Wednesday, September 17th

Gender Café - "Everything you Wanted to Know about Gender (Studies) but Were Afraid to Ask"
Facilitators: The GSI Directors: Dr. Bob Doede (Philosophy), Dr. Robynne Healey (History), Dr. Allyson Jule (Education), Dr. Holly Nelson (English)

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Open question period and discussion on any topics related to gender.

FREE! All welcome.

Thursday, September 18th

Fireside Apologetics
Dr. Gordon Nickel, University of Calgary, Dr. Paul Chamberlain, ACTS Seminaries/TWU - "Gentle Answers: Responding to Muslim critiques of the Bible"

Time: 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Location: Room 130/131, Fosmark Centre
Registration: This event is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

Join us for a conversation between Drs. Gordon Nickel and Paul Chamberlain regarding Islamic critiques of the Bible.

Dr. Gordon Nickel is adjunct professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Calgary and Director of the new Centre for Islamic Studies at South Asia Institute of Advanced Christian Studies. Dr. Paul Chamberlain is Associate Professor of Apologetics and Philosophy at ACTS Seminaries, as well as Director of the Institute of Christian Apologetics.

Those interested in pursuing courses in Apologetics are especially encouraged to attend.

For more information contact Jacqueline Young at jacqueline.young@twu.ca.

Full Professor Inaugural Lecture
Kevin Schut - "Of Games & God: A Christian Exploration of Video Games"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Auditorium, Northwest Building
RSVP: Colleen Hansen Colleen.Hansen@twu.ca

Video games matter. They may seem like trifles, or something that only belongs to a weird subculture. Some argue they only matter because they’re a big business. Others argue they matter because they’re a cultural threat. All of these observations are partly true, but they miss a bigger point: the video game is a unique medium that has potential we are just starting to tap. And just like other media, video games have the potential to hurt us and to bless us. Join Dr. Kevin Schut in his inaugural public lecture as a full professor to talk about his journey as a scholar of video games and video game culture. Through a mix of research, game images, autobiography, and game demonstrations, Dr. Schut will wrestle with the implications of video games for Christians, and explain why he believes, in spite of the many challenges and problems, this is a medium that can be tremendously redemptive.

Bio: Kevin Schut has been a professor in the department of Media + Communication since 2004. His research focuses on video games, and what they tell us about media, culture, and faith. He’s the author of the book Of Games and God: A Christian Exploration of Video Games, published in 2013. Kevin loves to play LEGO video games with his three daughters, and in his spare time, he likes to play games.

Coming Events in September

Monday, September 22nd

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Hans Boersma, Regent College - "Why We Need an 'Other' Reading: Or, why we ourselves are the ones taking the exodus journey"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: Is there anything we can still learn from the way people used to read the Bible in the early church? Aren’t the strange, so-called allegorical readings of the fathers arbitrary? This lecture makes clear why we actually need the “other” readings of the early church. We will interrogate two early Christians (Melito of Sardis and Origen of Alexandria) with hard questions that contemporary Christians often raise when they first encounter the strange, new world of early Christian interpretation of the Bible.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Tuesday, September 23rd

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Hans Boersma, Regent College - Lunch discussion

Time: 11:40 am - 12:50 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: Is there anything we can still learn from the way people used to read the Bible in the early church? Aren’t the strange, so-called allegorical readings of the fathers arbitrary? This lecture makes clear why we actually need the “other” readings of the early church. We will interrogate two early Christians (Melito of Sardis and Origen of Alexandria) with hard questions that contemporary Christians often raise when they first encounter the strange, new world of early Christian interpretation of the Bible.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Coming Events in October

Tuesday, October 14th

Gender Café - "Reflections on Boyhood in response to the film Boyhood (2014), directed by Richard Linklater and starring Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette"
Facilitator: Dr. Todd Martin, Sociology, TWU

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Suggestion (not required): Watch the movie before the cafe.

FREE! All welcome.

Wednesday, October 22nd

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Stephen Fowl, Loyola College of Maryland - "Historical Criticism, Theological Interpretation and the Ends of the Christian Life"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Thursday, October 23rd

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Stephen Fowl, Loyola College of Maryland - Lunch discussion

Time: 11:40 am - 12:50 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: Is there anything we can still learn from the way people used to read the Bible in the early church? Aren’t the strange, so-called allegorical readings of the fathers arbitrary? This lecture makes clear why we actually need the “other” readings of the early church. We will interrogate two early Christians (Melito of Sardis and Origen of Alexandria) with hard questions that contemporary Christians often raise when they first encounter the strange, new world of early Christian interpretation of the Bible.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Coming Events in November

Wednesday, November 12th

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Christopher Seitz, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto - "A Canonical Reading of Ecclesiastes"

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Thursday, November 13th

Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion and Culture Lecture Series - Scripture, Theology, and Culture: Acts of Interpretation
Christopher Seitz, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto - Lunch discussion

Time: 11:40 am - 12:50 pm
Location: TBA

Biblical interpretation is moving in a direction that gradually recognizes and seeks to redress a longstanding separation of biblical studies from ecclesial theology. To correct dogmatic abuse of scripture, historical criticism had justly drawn attention to the socio-cultural and historical dimensions of biblical texts, but largely neglected the Bible’s role as sacred text within a believing community. Over the last generation, theological interpretation has received renewed attention and seeks to close this gap. The tension between critical analysis of the Bible as an ancient text and its foundational function for the church’s faith has always existed, but historical criticism and modern hermeneutic theory has increased our awareness that biblical interpretation depends on a complex interaction of theological tradition, cultural influences, and exegetical practices. This speaker series features a combination of case studies, of concrete ‘acts of interpretation,’ and broader reflections on the intersection of exegesis, theology, and science and culture to address the question how a faithful, ecclesial reading of scripture handles these complexities of interpretation.

Abstract: Is there anything we can still learn from the way people used to read the Bible in the early church? Aren’t the strange, so-called allegorical readings of the fathers arbitrary? This lecture makes clear why we actually need the “other” readings of the early church. We will interrogate two early Christians (Melito of Sardis and Origen of Alexandria) with hard questions that contemporary Christians often raise when they first encounter the strange, new world of early Christian interpretation of the Bible.

Sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture.

For more information contact Natalie Boldt at Natalie.Boldt@mytwu.ca.

Gender Café - "Generous Spaciousness: Responding to Gay Christians in the Church" (based on the 2014 book of the same name)
Facilitator: Wendy VanderWal Gritter, Executive Director of New Direction Ministries

Time: 7:00 - 8:30 pm
Location: Graduate Collegium, Fosmark Centre

Suggestion (not required): Read the book before the cafe.

Wendy VanderWal Gritter (MDiv, Tyndale Seminary) is the author of Generous Spaciousness: Responding to Gay Christians in the Church, executive director of New Direction Ministries of Canada in Mississauga, Ontario, and an internationally recognized contributor to conversations about faith and sexuality.

FREE! All welcome.

 

If you would like to receive a weekly email highlighting the current and upcoming academic events of TWU, please email Sue Funk at sue.funk@twu.ca

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