“What Helps and Hinders Building Shame Resilience in Adolescents Diagnosed with Eating Disorders: A Retrospective Critical Incident Technique Study”

Academic Events
Trinity Western University
22500 University Dr
Alumni Hall, Reimer Student Centre
Langley, BC V2Y1Y1
Canada

THESIS DEFENCE

Hilary Evans, “What Helps and Hinders Building Shame Resilience in Adolescents Diagnosed with Eating Disorders: A Retrospective Critical Incident Technique Study”

Examining Committee

Supervisor: Mihaela Launeau, PhD

Second Reader: Krista Socholotiuk, PhD

Third Reader: Kathryn Weaver, PhD, UNB

Exam Chair: TBD

ABSTRACT

Eating disorders in adolescence are serious mental health disorders that commonly have noteworthy medical comorbidities (Fitzsimmons-Craft, Karam, Wilfley, 2018). Shame has been found to be a significant factor associated with eating disorders (Burney & Irwin, 2000; Goss & Allan, 2009; Waller, Ohanian, & Osman, 2000), yet few to no studies have explored what helps and hinders building shame resilience for adolescents with an eating disorder. This qualitative study used the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique (Butterfield, Borgen, Maglio, & Amundson, 2009), where participants were asked to recall: (a) incidents that helped build shame resilience, (b) incidents that hindered building shame resilience, and (c) what they wished for that they think may have helped them build shame resilience. The sample of this study included 10 women who received an eating disorder diagnosis between the age of 11 and 21. Data analysis revealed 13 helping categories, 15 hindering categories, and 9 wish list items. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.