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Year Course ID Course
2021-2022 GENV 109

Introduction to Physical Geology

An introduction to the materials and processes of the physical earth: rocks and minerals, earth structure and composition, plate tectonics, volcanology, seismology, crustal deformation, weathering and erosion, slope movement, sedimentation, wind and water processes, glaciation, and geologic time. Earth materials and processes are studied in the laboratory and in the field. This course is an environmental studies core requirement.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
Cross-listed: GEOL 109
2021-2022 GENV 111

Human Geography & Global Change

An introduction to human geography and the notion of globalization by exploring some of the major economic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and technological changes that have recently occurred at the global level and are shaping local places. The course is designed to provide students with better understanding of the variation, interaction, and interdependence of places, regions, people and their environments in a globalizing world; and to demonstrate how human geographers might consider and examine the concepts, forces, processes, issues, and ideas that are associated with global transformation.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 GENV 121

Introduction to Earth Systems Science

Through an investigation of the fundamental concepts of earth systems science from a geographic perspective, students will develop confidence in using the scientific method. Emphasis in the course is placed on understanding the origins and development of Earth's surface features; the characteristics and circulations of Earth's atmosphere, including weather systems and global climates; and introducing the biophysical principles governing vegetation distribution patterns on Earth. Lab exercises will provide students hands-on opportunities to further develop their scientific literacy as it relates to earth systems science and beyond. This course is primarily intended for non- science majors.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (3-2; 3-2)
2021-2022 GENV 131

Global Environment Issues

An investigation of the scientific principles behind environmental issues and practical inquiry-based approaches to environment concerns in our local and global communities. The course integrates theoretical knowledge about the environment with real-life activities in a multitude of settings outside of the classroom to help students learn about complex interactions between human populations and their environments; and to inspire critical thinking about environmental challenges for today and future generations.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 GENV 182

Digital Earth

Principles of spatial and digital literacy applied to the geographic context of our contemporary world.  In this course, students will discover the importance of place, spatial data collection, assessment of spatial patterns and principles of scale.  Students will gain an understanding of the nature of geospatial data, and explore geospatial technologies such as GPS, mobile maps, satellite data and GIS.  Students will discover digital cartography principles and spatial analysis techniques.  Students will learn about applications of citizen science, digital humanitarianism and responding to humanitarian needs and crises through geospatial technologies.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 0-0)
2021-2022 GENV 212

Urbanization Issues of Developing Countries

This course explores urbanization processes in developing countries, particularly in urban settings across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It provides a geographic perspective on the socio-economic, political, cultural, and environmental conditions under which cities of the Third World are rapidly growing and their relation to globalization issues. Case studies from selected areas examine such problems as unemployment, inadequate health services, housing shortages, and inadequate urban infrastructure.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 GENV 216

Plant Environments

An inventory of plant life across major habitats - particularly in the local area of British Columbia - this course provides insights into the ecology of these environments. Local field trips highlight natural habitats, agricultural and horticultural crops, and managed forests. Critical assessment of planetary stewardship forms a common theme.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Instructor's consent.
NB: Summer sessions only. Includes field work in the Gulf Islands. Not offered every year See department chair
Cross-listed: BIOL 216
2021-2022 GENV 220

Geology of the Vancouver Region

An overview of the fundamental earth science processes responsible for the creation, transformation, and ongoing physical development of the Pacific Northwest. These processes are studied in the context of the building of the North American continent through tectonic forces and surface dynamics. Topics include: geologic time, tectonics, volcanology, seismology, stratigraphy, glaciation, erosion, paleontology, paleoclimatology, and environmental issues. Field trips and field studies are included.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
Cross-listed: GEOL 220
2021-2022 GENV 230

Geography of Canada

This course describes and explores Canada's physical and human geography focusing on the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and cultural change. It emphasizes the diversity and interrelationships between the physical and human landscapes which have evolved over time, creating the identifiable regions and subregions within the country.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 3-0)
2021-2022 GENV 231

Environmental Philosophy

An overview of the various perspectives put forward in the West on the proper human relationship to the environment. We will investigate the metaphysics behind the fact/value dichotomy, the currently influential views on the human-nature relationship, various environmental ethical frameworks, the distinctive characteristics of moral reasoning and argumentation as they bear on the human-nature relationship, and the religious, economic, socio-cultural, and ideological factors contributory to the rise of the ecological crisis. We conclude by critically interrogating the conceptual substructures of some popular contemporary environmental frameworks.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
Cross-listed: PHIL 231
2021-2022 GENV 262

Marine Biology

A study of the life history and distribution of marine organisms in several major habitat types, including soft sediment and rocky substrate communities. Emphasis is on field and laboratory work in a survey of common local marine plants and animals and their relationships. Includes field work in the Lower Mainland, Gulf Islands, and/or Vancouver Island.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Instructor's consent.
NB: Summer sessions only. Not offered every year See department chair
Cross-listed: BIOL 262
2021-2022 GENV 282

Geographic Information Systems

Students are invited into understanding and using quantitative and computational inquiry to understand and discern computer-based spatial analysis as a mode of inquiry. Students develop confidence in using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and accompanying computer- based, spatial analytical tools to model geographic problems using mathematical and computing notation. Students are provided with the opportunity to investigate the theory and practical utility of GIS through collecting empirical spatial data, analyzing quantitative data, conducting computational spatial analyses to answer meaningful geographic and environmental questions, making judgements based on quantitative information derived from these analyses, and communicating the results with purposeful, multi-audience cartographic products.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-2)
2021-2022 GENV 312

Wilderness, Water, and Global Warming: Canadian Environmental History

A thematic case study approach to Canadian Environmental History that highlights the nation's unique reciprocal relationships with nature as illustrated through ideas (Wilderness), material resources (Water) and social/ethical issues (Global Warming). Investigates how "natural"ť elements like climate, topography, plants, animals and diseases have influenced our choices about nature, and how "cultural"ť content, like "clean/green"ť energy initiatives, pipeline projects, save the whale campaigns, and fear of climate change, have shaped our perceptions of the places we inhabit. Critically engages the ethical decisions we make about the environment that may determine the future we wish to construct as Canadian and global citizens.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 212, 131, or 230 or instructor's consent.
NB: Offered every other year.
Cross-listed: HIST 339
2021-2022 GENV 316

Plant Ecology

The crucial role of plant ecology in shaping major habitats, including those in British Columbia, will be examined. A trip to Salt Spring Island will highlight the threatened Garry oak ecosystem and other features of interest. Field trips throughout the course will highlight the population dynamics and interrelationships of plant communities in natural habitats, agricultural crops and managed forests. Critical assessment of planetary stewardship will form a common theme across various issues in plant ecology.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114.
NB: Summer sessions only. Offered every other year.
Cross-listed: BIOL 318
2021-2022 GENV 318

Tropical Botany

This course explores the botanical riches of the tropics, focussing on the plant life of Hawaii. The course traces fundamentals of plant taxonomy, physiology and ecology in relation to complexities of existence on the most isolated island chain in the world. Issues related to indigenous vegetation including effects of introduced animals and plants, agriculture and ethnobotany will be discussed. The course will involve one week of lectures at Trinity Western University Langley campus and two weeks of lectures and field work in the Hawaiian Islands.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114 and instructor's consent. BIOL 216 or 312 or 314 or BIOL/GENV 316 strongly recommended.
NB: Offered every other year.
2021-2022 GENV 320

Geomorpology

A scientific examination of the physical processes which shape landform development, structure, and dynamics. Topics include: weathering, slope systems, fluvial and coastal environments, and glacial and periglacial systems. Special emphasis is placed on deciphering past events from current landscape structures. Field trips and field studies are required.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent. (3-2; 0-0)
NB: Offered every other year.
Cross-listed: GEOL 320
2021-2022 GENV 321

Geography of Soils

A scientific investigation of the various aspects of soil as a natural resource. Topics include: physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of soils applied in the context of soil formation, soil classification and land use, agriculture, and environmental engineering. Soil mapping and spatial distribution of soils is also considered. Field trips and field studies are required.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent. (3-3; 0-0)
NB: Offered every other year.
Cross-listed: GEOL 321
2021-2022 GENV 322

Global Climate Change

Students will investigate what are the scientific principles and processes which govern natural and human-induced climate change. Students will gather evidence drawing on the latest research and evolving pattern of scientific data that has emerged on climate in recent years. Employing scientific data, students will then be invited to analyze the severity of climate change impacts on a myriad of living and nonliving systems such as arctic sea-ice, freshwater, terrestrial and marine ecosystems; as well as analyzing the socio- economic changes and adaptations that human communities are making in response to Earth's changing climate.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor's consent.
NB: Offered every other year.
2021-2022 GENV 331

Environmental Philosophy

Explores the theological and philosophical dimensions of the doctrine of creation and from there highlights the various philosophical shifts of outlook that helped usher in modern naturalism and its notions of nature. We will investigate the metaphysics behind the fact/value dichotomy, various environmental ethical frameworks, the case for the moral status of non-human animals and abiotic entities, the evolution of the ecological crisis, the conceptual substructures of some popular contemporary environmental frameworks, and some of the agendas of response to our current ecological crisis

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 2nd-year status; or instructor's permission.(3-0;3-0)
Cross-listed: PHIL 331
2021-2022 GENV 341

Resource and Environmental Management

An introduction to key concepts and issues in natural resources management. The course examines major resource-based industries, including agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, energy, and recreation. It also emphasizes understanding the varied influences that environmental, socio-economic, and political factors have on the spatial distribution of resource utilization and resource management.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor's consent. )
NB: Offered every other year.