Code
Course Credits
ENGL 101 ENGL 101 - Introduction to Writing

This course guides students through the writing and research tasks of the university classroom in order to equip them with confidence and the ability to write in a variety of academic genres, including the research paper. Students expand critical thinking skills through reading and writing cognitively complex arguments while also exploring academic voice, style, and vocabulary.

Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University. (3- 0; 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 102 ENGL 102 - Introduction to Literature and Culture

This course examines literature from a multicultural perspective. In comparing and contrasting works of literature composed in a variety of countries, students will gain cultural literacy, appreciation of universal themes, and understanding of the rich relationship between literature and its historical and situational context. In studying this material, students will develop their critical thinking, research, and writing skills. This course is recommended for students who have come from international contexts. Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 103 ENGL 103 - Introduction to Fiction

An introductory study of fiction with the purpose of understanding literature and cultivating skills in scholarly research, textual analysis, and academic writing and documentation. Such skills are fostered by closely reading and analyzing works of short fiction and the novel by accomplished prose stylists. Students focus on the distinctive conventions of fiction in order to interpret these works critically, while interacting thoughtfully with themes presented therein; there is a particular focus on analyzing and making use of narrative strategies and rhetorical tools. Students continue to develop their academic prose, with attention to improving foundational grammar, diction, phrasing, organization, and argument-building in the thesis-driven essay.Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 104 ENGL 104 - Introduction to Poetry and Drama

Building on the skills acquired in English 103, an advanced study of poetry and drama with the purpose of understanding literature and cultivating skills in scholarly research, textual analysis, and academic writing and documentation. Such skills are fostered by closely reading and analyzing poems and plays by accomplished writers. Students focus on the distinctive conventions of the genres of poetry and drama in order to interpret these works critically, while interacting thoughtfully with themes presented therein; there is a particular focus on analyzing and making use of effective patterns of language, lyrical and theatrical presentation, and figures of speech. Students continue to develop their academic prose, with attention to advanced grammar, diction, phrasing, organization and argument-building in the thesis-driven essay.

Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 207 ENGL 207 - Introduction to Creative Writing

A seminar in the techniques of imaginative writing and in the development of a critical appreciation of the art of writing in its varied forms. This course focuses on free verse poetry, flash fiction, the short story, and short dramatic works.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 103 and 104, with a minimum grade of B. (2-1; 2-1)

3.00
ENGL 208 ENGL 208 - Introduction to Creative Writing

A seminar in the techniques of creative writing, particularly of shorter fiction, and in the development of a critical appreciation of the art of writing in its varied forms through the study and modeling of representative works of literature.Prerequisite(s): ENGL 103 and 104, with a minimum grade of B. (2-1; 2-1)

3.00
ENGL 213 ENGL 213 - Major Authors

A concentrated study of 10 to 12 authors from the medieval period to the early 18th century, including Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton.NB: Strongly recommended for students intending to major in English.Prerequisite(s): ENGL 103, 104. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 232 ENGL 232 - Biblical Backgrounds of English Lit

Readings in the various genres of Biblical literature with attention to the cultural and literary context of these works. This course includes the study of selected works of English literature that have been influenced by the Biblical literary tradition.NB: Either ENGL 231 or 232 is recommended for English majors.Prerequisite(s): ENGL 103, 104. (3-0; 9-0)

3.00
ENGL 351 ENGL 351 - Shakespeare

An intensive study of selected works by William Shakespeare situated in their Elizabethan and Jacobean contexts. Works studied may include the sonnets, the history play Henry IV (Parts 1 and 2) or Henry V, the comedies A Midsummer Night's Dream and As You Like It, the problem play Measure for Measure, the tragedies King Lear andMacbeth, and the romance Cymbeline.Cross-listed: THTR 341.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 372 ENGL 372 - Romantic Poetry and Poetics

A study of the poetry created by the six major poets grouped under the term Romantic: William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron (George Gordon), Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats. Students consider both the poetry and critical theories of these influential authors.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 390 ENGL 390 - Individual Authors

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to study the works of significant writers while also providing opportunities for engagement with significant thematic concerns and special topics in literary studies. Students may take two or more versions of this course.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 392 ENGL 392 - Fantasy Literature

Approaches to the genre of fantasy literature, also examining early works (including Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight) which shaped the imagination of creators of modern fantasy such as C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
ENGL 403 ENGL 403 - Preparing for English Professions

A colloquium designed to introduce students to practical techniques and strategies for continuing in their academic and professional lives after graduating with an English degree. This course prepares students for further academic study, and for writing in academic, creative, and professional contexts.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing. (3-0 or 3-0)

1.00
ENGL 430 ENGL 430 - Medieval English Literature

A range of non-Chaucerian medieval English writings covering a number of different themes. Works studied may include secular and religious lyrics, mystery and morality plays, sermons, debates, visionary or mystical poetry and prose, and romance.NB: No overlap with ENGL 422.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 451 ENGL 451 - Drama to 1642

A study of English drama from its liturgical origins to the closing of the theatres in 1642, including medieval mystery cycles and morality plays as well as works by Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline playwrights.Cross-listed: THTR 441.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
ENGL 482 ENGL 482 - World Literature in English

This course focuses on issues related to post-colonialism and literature through the study of literature written in English by writers from post-colonial nations.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
ENGL 495 ENGL 495 - Literary Theory

A survey of the major interpretive approaches to literature from post-structuralism to the recent ethical turn in literary theory. Designed to complement ENGL 490, the course examines contemporary theory and practice (e.g., deconstruction, psychoanalytical criticism, neo-Marxism, historicism, philosophical hermeneutics, gender studies, and ethical criticism) and considers the social and intellectual context out of which each approach arises.NB: This course is required of all Honours English students.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of English and third or fourth year standing or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00