Code Course Credits
GENV 109 GENV 109 - Introduction to Physical Geology

An introduction to the materials and processes of the physical earth: rocks and minerals, earth structure and composition, plate tectonics, vulcanology, seismology, crustal deformation, weathering and erosion, slope movement, sedimentation, wind and water processes, glaciation, and geologic time. Earth materials and processes are studied in the laboratory and in the field. This course is an environmental studies core requirement.

NB: Fulfils the academic core laboratory science requirements.

Cross-listed: GEOL 109

Prerequisite(s): None. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 111 GENV 111 - Human Geography and Global Change

An introduction to human geography and the notion of globalization by exploring some of the major economic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and technological changes that have recently occurred at the global level and are shaping local places. The course is designed to provide students with better understanding of the variation, interaction, and interdependence of places, regions, people and their environments in a globalizing world; and to demonstrate how human geographers might consider and examine the concepts, forces, processes, issues, and ideas that are associated with global transformation.

Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 121 GENV 121 - Earth and Atmospheric Science

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and systems of Earth and atmospheric science from a geographic perspective. Emphasis is placed on the origins and development of Earth’s surface features; the characteristics and circulations of the atmosphere, including weather and global climates; and the biophysical principles governing vegetation on Earth.

Prerequisite(s): None. (3-3; 3-3)

3.00
GENV 131 GENV 131 - Global Environment Issues

An investigation of the scientific principles behind environmental issues and practical inquiry-based approaches to environment concerns in our local and global communities. The course integrates theoretical knowledge about the environment with real-life activities in a multitude of settings outside of the classroom to help students learn about complex interactions between human populations and their environments; and to inspire critical thinking about environmental challenges for today and future generations.

NB: Fulfils academic core society and culture requirement

Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 182 GENV 182 - Digital Earth

Principles of spatial and digital literacy applied to the geographic context of our contemporary world.  In this course, students will discover the importance of place, spatial data collection, assessment of spatial patterns and principles of scale.  Students will gain an understanding of the nature of geospatial data, including object data, gridded data and attribute data.  Student will explore geospatial technologies such as GPS, mobile maps, satellite data and GIS.  Students will discover digital cartography principles and spatial analysis techniques.  Students will learn about applications of citizen science, digital humanitarianism and responding to humanitarian needs and crises through geospatial technologies. 

Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 212 GENV 212 - Urbanization Issues of Developing Countries

This course explores urbanization processes in developing countries, particularly in urban settings across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It provides a geographic perspective on the socio-economic, political, cultural, and environmental conditions under which cities of the Third World are rapidly growing and their relation to globalization issues. Case studies from selected areas examine such problems as unemployment, inadequate health services, housing shortages, and inadequate urban infrastructure.

Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 216 GENV 216 - Plant Environments

An inventory of plant life across major habitats - particularly in the local area of British Columbia - this course provides insights into the ecology of these environments. Local field trips highlight natural habitats, agricultural and horticultural crops, and managed forests. Critical assessment of planetary stewardship forms a common theme.

NB: Summer sessions only. Includes field work in the Gulf Islands. Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: BIOL 216.

Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s consent.

3.00
GENV 220 GENV 220 - Geology of the Vancouver Region

An overview of the fundamental earth science processes responsible for the creation, transformation, and ongoing physical development of the Pacific Northwest. These processes are studied in the context of the building of the North American continent through tectonic forces and surface dynamics. Topics include: geologic time, tectonics, volcanology, seismology, stratigraphy, glaciation, erosion, paleontology, paleoclimatology, and environmental issues. Field trips and field studies are included.

Cross-listed: GEOL 220.

Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 230 GENV 230 - Geography of Canada

This course describes and explores Canada’s physical and human geography focusing on the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and cultural change. It emphasizes the diversity and interrelationships between the physical and human landscapes which have evolved over time, creating the identifiable regions and subregions within the country.

Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 231 GENV 231 - Environmental Philosophy

An overview of the various perspectives put forward in the West on the proper human relationship to the environment. We will investigate the metaphysics behind the fact/value dichotomy, the currently influential views on the human‐nature relationship, various environmental ethical frameworks, the distinctive characteristics of moral reasoning and argumentation as they bear on the human‐nature relationship, and the religious, economic, socio-cultural, and ideological factors contributory to the rise of the ecological crisis. We conclude by critically interrogating the conceptual substructures of some popular contemporary environmental frameworks.

Cross-listed: PHIL 231

Prerequisite(s): None.

3.00
GENV 262 GENV 262 - Marine Biology

A study of the life history and distribution of marine organisms in several major habitat types, including soft sediment and rocky substrate communities. Emphasis is on field and laboratory work in a survey of common local marine plants and animals and their relationships. Includes field work in the Lower Mainland, Gulf Islands, and/or Vancouver Island.

NB: Summer sessions only. Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: BIOL 262

Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s consent.

3.00
GENV 282 GENV 282 - Geographic Information Systems

​​Students are invited into understanding and using quantitative and computational inquiry to understand and discern computer-based spatial analysis as a mode of inquiry. Students develop confidence in using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and accompanying computer- based, spatial analytical tools to model geographic problems using mathematical and computing notation. Students are provided with the opportunity to investigate the theory and practical utility of GIS through collecting empirical spatial data, analyzing quantitative data, conducting computational spatial analyses to answer meaningful geographic and environmental questions, making judgements based on quantitative information derived from these analyses, and communicating the results with purposeful, multi-audience cartographic products.

Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-2)

3.00
GENV 312 GENV 312 - Wilderness, Water, and Global Warming: Canadian Environmental History

A thematic case study approach to Canadian Environmental History that highlights the nation’s unique reciprocal relationships with nature as illustrated through ideas (Wilderness), material resources (Water) and social/ethical issues (Global Warming). Investigates how “natural” elements like climate, topography, plants, animals and diseases have influenced our choices about nature, and how “cultural” content, like “clean/green” energy initiatives, pipeline projects, save the whale campaigns, and fear of climate change, have shaped our perceptions of the places we inhabit. Critically engages the ethical decisions we make about the environment that may determine the future we wish to construct as Canadian and global citizens.

NB: Offered every other year.

Cross-listed: HIST 339.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 212, 131, or 230 or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 316 GENV 316 - Plant Ecology

The crucial role of plant ecology in shaping major habitats, including those in British Columbia, will be examined. A trip to Salt Spring Island will highlight the threatened Garry oak ecosystem and other features of interest. Field trips throughout the course will highlight the population dynamics and interrelationships of plant communities in natural habitats, agricultural crops and managed forests. Critical assessment of planetary stewardship will form a common theme across various issues in plant ecology.

NB: Summer sessions only. Offered every other year.

Cross-listed: BIOL 318

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 318 GENV 318 - Tropical Botany

This course explores the botanical riches of the tropics, focussing on the plant life of Hawaii. The course traces fundamentals of plant taxonomy, physiology and ecology in relation to complexities of existence on the most isolated island chain in the world. Issues related to indigenous vegetation including effects of introduced animals and plants, agriculture and ethnobotany will be discussed. The course will involve one week of lectures at Trinity Western University Langley campus and two weeks of lectures and field work in the Hawaiian Islands.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114 and instructors consent. BIOL 216 or 312 or 314 or BIOL/GENV 316 strongly recommended.

3.00
GENV 320 GENV 320 - Geomorphology

A scientific examination of the physical processes which shape landform development, structure, and dynamics. Topics include: weathering, slope systems, fluvial and coastal environments, and glacial and periglacial systems. Special emphasis is placed on deciphering past events from current landscape structures. Field trips and field studies are required.

NB: Offered every other year.

Cross-listed: GEOL 320.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor’s consent. (3-2; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 321 GENV 321 - Geography of Soils

A scientific investigation of the various aspects of soil as a natural resource. Topics include: physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of soils applied in the context of soil formation, soil classification and land use, agriculture, and environmental engineering. Soil mapping and spatial distribution of soils is also considered.

Field trips and field studies are required.

NB: Offered every other year.

Cross-listed: GEOL 321.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor’s consent. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 322 GENV 322 - Global Climate Change

Students will investigate what are the scientific principles and processes which govern natural and human-induced climate change. Students will gather evidence drawing on the latest research and evolving pattern of scientific data that has emerged on climate in recent years. Employing scientific data, students will then be invited to analyze the severity of climate change impacts on a myriad of living and nonliving systems such as arctic sea-ice, freshwater, terrestrial and marine ecosystems; as well as analyzing the socio- economic changes and adaptations that human communities are making in response to Earth’s changing climate.

NB: Offered every other year

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 121, 131; 220; or GEOL 109; or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 332 GENV 332 - Geography of Western Canada

This course provides an overview of the physical and human geography that shapes and defines the Prairie provinces and British Columbia. The course focuses on selected cultural and environmental factors in understanding the spatial variation in population patterns and economic activity. Emphasis is also placed on the role of regional literature and painting in the formation of regional images.

NB: Offered every other year. Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 341 GENV 341 - Resource and Environmental Management

An introduction to key concepts and issues in natural resources management. The course examines major resource-based industries, including agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, energy, and recreation. It also emphasizes understanding the varied influences that environmental, socio-economic, and political factors have on the spatial distribution of resource utilization and resource management.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 343 GENV 343 - Geography of the Pacific Rim

This course examines the physical and human geography of the Pacific Rim. It gives particular attention to regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, as well as globalization and its impact on this region. The Pacific Rim is a geographic realm that has changed dramatically since the middle of the 20th century, therefore, this course explores the dynamic issues, problems, and challenges facing contemporary Pacific Rim countries, how the issues are being addressed, and the future prospects for the people and countries within this region.

NB: Offered every other year. Fulfils area studies requirements for International Studies major/honours.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 344 GENV 344 - Geography of Africa

This course examines the human and physical geography of Africa. Attention is given to the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and globalization and its impact on this vast continent. Because Africa is a geographic realm that has changed dramatically since the middle of the 20th century, this course explores the dynamic issues, problems, and challenges facing contemporary African societies, how the issues are being addressed, and the future prospects for the people and countries within this geographic region.

NB: Offered every other year. Fulfils area studies requirements for International Studies major/honours.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)220

3.00
GENV 354 GENV 354 - Geography of the World Economy

This course introduces students to the globalization of the world economy. It provides theoretical and practical foundation for exploring the global economy in an era of technological advancements, restructuring economies, and geopolitical realignments. It focuses on economic development of developed and developing countries of the world, and examine the impacts and critical problems associated with economic growth, development, and distribution and how to address the problems.

NB: Offered every other year.

Cross-listed: ECON 354.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or third year standing in Economics/ Business, or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 355 GENV 355 - Geography of Urban Areas

This course focuses on the origin, physical environment, and structure of urban settlements; the growth and processes of urbanization; and the impact of globalization on urban centres. It investigates societal issues common to urban environments including; poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, criminality, environmental degradation and deterioration of the built environment. It also provides an overview of urban renewal and planning processes.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111, 131; 212, or 230; or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 356 GENV 356 - Urban and Regional Planning

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the principles, problems, and techniques of urban, suburban, rural, and regional land use planning. It focuses on the elements and make-up of the comprehensive plan, the politics of planning, and the assessment of economic, social and environmental plans.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including one of GENV 111; 212; 355 or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 362 GENV 362 - Marine Ecology

A study of the ecological relationships of marine life in several major habitat types. Emphasis is on productivity, food webs, nutrient cycling, and community ecology. Ecosystem parameters are investigated through field and laboratory studies. Part of coursework takes place in the Lower Mainland, Gulf Islands, and/or Vancouver Island.

NB: Summer sessions only. Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: BIOL 362.

Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing in biology and instructor’s content. BIOL 308 and/or 360 strongly recommended.

3.00
GENV 364 GENV 364 - Coral Reef Ecology

A field course focusing on the systematics and ecology of tropical coral reef organisms. Plants, animals, and physical factors of a fringing coral reef are examined through snorkeling excursions and laboratory studies. One species is chosen for a detailed research project. Includes field course work in Hawaii.

NB: Summer sessions only. Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: BIOL 364.

Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing in biology and instructor’s content. BIOL 262, 308, 360 and/or 382 strongly recommended.

3.00
GENV 372, 373 GENV 372, 373 - Internship/Practicum

This internship course gives students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to a real world work environment. The course is an efficient way to hone students’ practical skills in spatial information science (SIS) and analysis within the realms of geography, environmental science, and/or geographic information systems (GIS) helping them gain valuable work experience by learning new skills, gaining new perspectives in integrating SIS, exploring the SIS work environment, and networking with the experts in this field. This practicum is offered as a tripartite arrangement that includes: the student, the University’s course instructor/program coordinator, and the approved practicum supervisor in a reputable government department, business, or non-profit/non-governmental organization. 

NB: Pass/Fail course. See geography and environment coordinator/department chair.

Prerequisite(s): Third year standing with a minimum of 9 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including two of GENV 111, 121, 131, 212, 282 or instructor’s consent

3.00
GENV 374, 375 GENV 374, 375 - Environmental Studies Internship

This internship/practicum course gives students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to a real-world work environment. The course is an efficient way to hone students’ practical skills in scientific and social scientific analysis within the realm of environmental science/studies helping them gain valuable work experience by learning new skills, gaining new perspectives in areas such as environmental assessment and ecological analyses, and networking with the experts in this field. This practicum is offered as a tripartite arrangement that includes the student, the University’s course instructor/program coordinator, and the approved practicum supervisor in a reputable government department, business, or nonprofit/non-governmental organization.

Prerequisite(s): Third year standing with a minimum of 9 sem. hrs. towards an GENV degree including two of BIOL 113, CHEM 101 or 111, GENV 121 and GENV 131 or instructor’s consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
GENV 381 GENV 381 - General Ecology

A study of the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Consideration of plant and animal populations in relation to physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting their interaction and productivity. Considerable laboratory time is devoted to the study of local ecosystems, field sampling techniques, and field trips to ecological research areas.

Cross-listed: BIOL 381.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; or equivalent. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
GENV 382 GENV 382 - Applied Geographic Information Systems

This course focuses on the utility of Geographic Information Systems in problem solving and decision-making in real world settings. Students are expected to complete a major term project in consultation with the instructor.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment including GENV 282, or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-2)

3.00
GENV 383 GENV 383 - Geographic Data Analysis

Geography is an integrative spatial science that attempts to explain and predict the spatial distributions and variation of human activity and physical features on the Earth’s surface. Geographers and Environmental scientists greatly benefit from the use of quantitative and computational analyses to help answer where, why and what-to-do questions. Geographers might explore such questions as: what type of municipal transportation policy might best achieve more equitable access for urban residents to city services and facilities? Environmental scientists might ask: what sort of land use decisions are required to balance sustainable economic development with protection of wetlands in a fragile ecosystem? Students are invited into understanding and using statistical analysis as a means to develop a quantitative and computational inquiry.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment. (0-0; 3-2)

3.00
GENV 391, 392 GENV 391, 392 - Directed Studies in Geography and Environment

In special cases, with the instructor’s consent, students may pursue an independent but guided reading and research course in a specialized area of geography of interest to students.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment, and instructor’s consent. See geography and environment coordinator. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
GENV 395 GENV 395 - Central America Field Study

This experiential and interdisciplinary course fosters interaction with diverse physical and human environments. It provides exposure to the region’s history, religions, politics, and socio- economic realities that shape the communication and cultures of Central America, and introduces students to cross-cultural communication.

Cross-listed: MCOM 395.

Prerequisite(s): Third year standing or instructor permission. (3-0 or 3-0).

3.00
GENV 396 GENV 396 - East Africa Field Study

This experiential and interdisciplinary course fosters interaction with diverse physical and human environments. It provides exposure to the region’s history, religions, politics, and socio- economic realities that shape the communication and cultures of East Africa and introduces students to cross-cultural communication.

Cross-listed: MCOM 396.

Prerequisite(s): Third year standing or instructor permission. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
GENV 400 GENV 400 - Special Topics in Geography and Environment

A study of special topics or issues in geography and environment that are not considered in-depth in other courses.

NB: Not offered every year. See geography and environment coordinator.

Prerequisite(s): Not offered every year. See geography and environment coordinator.

3.00
GENV 409 GENV 409 - Thesis Preparation

Students are required to choose a topic for their senior thesis (GENV 410) in consultation with an instructor. Selected readings and references pertinent to the topic are assigned. A final written and oral report is presented consisting of a detailed thesis proposal and a literature review. Students are advised to start in their third year to allow observations over a full calendar year.

Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing in geography and environment studies or instructor’s consent. (1-0; 0-0)

1.00
GENV 410 GENV 410 - Senior Thesis

Research in a chosen area of environmental studies with a final written report. Presentation of research findings are also made by the student in a seminar.

NB: Normally 2 sem. hrs. are assigned unless arrangements are made with the department chair.

Prerequisite(s): GENV 409, a related directed study in preparation, instructor’s consent. (0-0; 1- 2)

2.00
GENV 411 GENV 411 - Rural Development

The course is designed to introduce students to the broad concept of rural development, to the relationship between rural communities and their environments, and to the critical issues of rural restructuring and sustainability. This course examines the theoretical underpinnings, principles, and practices of rural development as well as the problems and challenges facing rural communities in both developed and developing countries. It is expected that, by the end of the course, students gain and/or broaden their knowledge of contemporary domestic and international rural development processes, practices, and issues.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment, third or fourth year standing, or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 412 GENV 412 - Senior Thesis

Research in a chosen area of environmental studies with a final written report. Students present research findings in a seminar. Allows students with larger projects to gain extra credit.

NB: Normally 3 sem. hrs. are assigned unless arrangements are made with the department chair.

Prerequisite(s): GENV 409, a related directed study in preparation, instructor’s consent. (0-0; 1- 2)

3.00
GENV 414 GENV 414 - Nature, Society, and History in Global Perspective

Human interaction with the environment is the most fundamental of all relationships. This course examines the different ways in which societies have defined, understood, and used their non- human surroundings and the processes through which the environment influences culture and adapts to human communities. Students explore the historical context of the human-nature interaction in global perspective and compare the ways in which the concepts of politics, nationalism, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, etc. inform and guide the relationship.

NB: Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: HIST 409

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history, third or fourth year standing, or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 441 GENV 441 - Resource Management in British Columbia

This course offers a detailed examination of natural resource management issues in British Columbia. It asks participants to consider selected BC environmental issues in a broad context by posing a number of questions: What do we mean when we use the term “environment”? What is problematic? To whom? What is the response?

How do we apply what we learn within the context of sustainability and stewardship of Creation? Course themes such as the case of Pacific salmon within the Fraser River Watershed are utilized.

NB: Offered every other year.

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment, third or fourth year standing, or instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
GENV 442 GENV 442 - Environmental Thought

A survey of the origin and development of those streams of geographic thought reflecting people’s relationship to the natural environment. The course includes discussions within the context of Christian and non-Christian alternatives, of the development of a responsible Christian environmental ethic and its application to global environmental issues.

NB: Offered every other year. 

Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of geography and environment, third or fourth year standing, or instructor’s consent. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
GENV 482 GENV 482 - Geovisualization and Analysis

An introduction to the underlying principles and methods of 3D modeling within ArcGIS 3D Analyst. It provides experience with 3DE tools as well as opportunities for practical, real-life applications through a series of examples and exercises, which include: constructing the 3D environment/ landscape, analyzing spatial data, and creating outputs (e.g., 3D maps), based on real-life modeling examples such as urban landscapes, parks, business locations, and housing.

Prerequisite(s): GENV 282 or instructor’s consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
GENV 484 GENV 484 - Applied Ecology

An exploration of various practical applications of biology in environmental management, monitoring, and remediation. Topics include many important areas of concern such as wildlife management, fisheries, forestry, agriculture, water and air pollution, and protection of endangered ecosystems. Various biological approaches to these are considered, such as population modelling, ecophysiology, microbiology techniques, biomonitoring, ecosystem health, and biodiversity inventories. The implications of environmental ethics and the role of Christian environmental stewardship are discussed.

NB: Not offered every year. See department chair.

Cross-listed: BIOL 484. 

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 381 (may be taken concurrently). (0-0; 3-3)

3.00

New courses to be added in Fall 2020.

CODE COURSE CREDITS STREAM
RELS 5XX (361) History of Christianity I 3 CT
RELS 5XX (362) History of Christianity II 3 CT
RELS 5XX (465) Influential Thinkers in the Christian Tradition 3 CT
RELS 5XX (466) The Church Fathers 3 CT
RELS 5XX (467) The Theology of Karl Barth 3 CT
RELS 5XX (475) Christianity and Culture 3 CT
RELS 5XX (476) Christian Worldviews in Historical and Cultural Context 3 CT
RELS 5XX (477) New Testament Canon: Development and Theology 3 NT, CT
RELS 5XX (381) Contemporary Christianity 3 CT
RELS 6XX History of Christian Doctrine 3 CT
RELS 6XX Early & Mediaveal Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Reformation Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Modern Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Method in Theology 3 NT, CT
RELS 6XX Theologies of Liberation 3 CT
RELS 6XX Special Topics in Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Major Paper 5 OT, NT, CT, BRL, BB