Code
Course Credits
HIST 107 HIST 107 - World History to 1750

This course involves a general examination of primary themes in the history of the world's major civilizations from antiquity to the 18th Century. Although European realities will be examined, the focus of this course will be global in nature with an emphasis on systems of cultural and economic exchange and on the global nature of historical development.Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)

3.00
HIST 111 HIST 111 - History of Western Civilization

An introduction to the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from its ancient origins to roughly 1600AD. Key topics include: the emergence of the first civilizations in the ancient Near East; the development of citizenship and philosophy in ancient Greece; the rise and decline of the Roman Empire; the growth and transformation of Christianity; medieval politics, culture, and society; changes in gender roles and the family; and the birth of the modern era in the Renaissance and Reformation.Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 0-0)

3.00
HIST 112 HIST 112 - History of Western Civilization

An introduction to the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from the mid-17th century to the mid-20th century. Key topics include: the rise of absolutism; the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; the Industrial and French Revolutions; the development of new political ideologies, including liberalism, nationalism and socialism; changes in gender roles and the family; colonialism and imperialism; the origins and consequences of both World Wars, fascism, communism, and the Cold War.Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 2-1)

3.00
HIST 135 HIST 135 - Pre-Confederation Canadian History

The political, economic, and social aspects of Canada's development from the geologic time to the 20th century. HIST 135 examines the First Nations, French, and British eras up to the time of Confederation. HIST 136 traces the development of Canada since 1867.Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)

3.00
HIST 136 HIST 136 - Post-Confederation Canadian History

The political, economic, and social aspects of Canada's development from the geologic time to the 20th century. HIST 135 examines the First Nations, French, and British eras up to the time of Confederation. HIST 136 traces the development of Canada since 1867.Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)

3.00
HIST 321 HIST 321 - Tudor-Stuart England

An exploration of the history of England from the coming of the Tudors in the 15th century to the so called Glorious Revolution at the end of the 17th century. This was an eventful age, featuring the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the creativity of William Shakespeare, a bitterly fought civil war, and the development of a limited monarchy. Particular attention is paid to two developments that transformed English life: the religious reformations of the 16th century, and the civil war and political revolutions of the 17th century.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History, including one of HIST 107, 111, 112 or permission of instructor. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
HIST 324 HIST 324 - Nineteenth Century Europe

This course examines the long 19th century from the French Revolution to the onset of the Great War. Explores key movements and themes in political, intellectual, and socio-economic history through lectures, discussion groups, and close readings of primary and secondary sources.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 108 or 112, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 334 HIST 334 - Canadian Government and Politics

Provides the student with a detailed examination of the political issues that divide and unite Canadians. Topics include discussion of alternative theoretical approaches to Canadian politics; regionalism, citizenship, and political participation; the French-English Cleavage; provincialism versus federalism; aboriginal politics; gender and class issues; the uneasy relationship between the United States and Canada; multiculturalism and bilingualism as key indicators of Canadian political culture; the Executive in Parliament dispute; legislative politics and judicial interpretation; law and constitution.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Cross-listed: POLS 334.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 135 or 136, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 335 HIST 335 - Dev't of the Canadian Constitution

A survey of the historical development of the Canadian Constitution from 1867 to the present. The search for an amending formula and the patriation of the Constitution. The evolving nature of the federation; the Meech Lake Accord; the Charlottetown Accord; the October 26 Referendum; Western demands for major changes to the Senate and other national institutions of the federation, and the unfinished constitutional agenda. The profound effect on law and public policy development resulting from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Cross-listed: POLS 335.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 135 or 136, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 361 HIST 361 - History of Christianity I

A study of the history of the Christian Church from the turn of the first century to the eve of the 16th century Reformation, with attention to the persons, events and issues involved in the major developments of Christianity.Cross-listed: RELS 361, HIST 561.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 111 or 112. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
HIST 362 HIST 362 - History of Christianity II

An examination of the development of the Christian Church from the late medieval period through the early 21st century. Key topics include: the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the Great Awakenings and the rise of modern Evangelism, Fundamentalism, and the growth of modern missionary movements, along with a consideration of significant individuals, changes in theology, institutions, devotional practices, gender roles, and attempts to engage and shape culture.Cross-listed: RELS 362, HIST 562.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 111 or 112. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 367 HIST 367 - History of the Family after 1600

An examination of the historical development of the family in the modern era. There is a central focus on the formation of families and households and the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course integrates contemporary gender theory, but concentrates on the lives and ideas of historical actors as they are revealed in the historical record.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 107, 111, 112, orinstructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 372 HIST 372 - History of Africa Since 1500

This course will involve a survey of Sub-Saharan African history since the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.'Primary emphasis will be on a variety of regions at various stages of their development, while exploring the roles of colonial power, emerging nationalisms and the politics of under-development.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 107 or 108. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 381 HIST 381 - History of the Modern Middle East

An examination of some major theses in the history of the Arab Middle East since the breakup of the Ottoman Empire following World War I. The course examines the role played by issues of identity in the development of national structures in the Arab East (Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States). Themes include the nature of the Islamic community, the structure and legacy of the Ottoman rule, post-Ottoman settlement and the impact of colonial rule, the emergence of nationalist politics and the growth of contemporary Arab state system, oil and the politics of family rule in the Gulf States, and the relationship between religion and politics.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 108 or 109. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
HIST 391 HIST 391 - Canadian Governmental Leadership 3.00
HIST 392 HIST 392 - Sugar,Slaves,Silver: Atlantic World

This course examines the Atlantic world during an era of immense global change. Since the navigations of the 15th century, the Atlantic has been a corridor for fundamental exchanges of peoples, crops, technology, and ideas. Topics include early maritime explorations, the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies, the labour migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the establishment of an Atlantic economy, the maturation of Euro-American colonial societies and their struggles for autonomy and national independence.NB: Not offered every year. See Department Chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History, third or forth year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
HIST 406 HIST 406 - War, Peace and Society

Examines the changing nature of, and approaches to, war and its effect on society from the ancient world to the present, including an assessment of various visions and proposals for peace. The course includes an assessment of historic and relatively recent armed conflicts, exploring the causes of contemporary conflict and some of its distinctive characteristics. It also evaluates the effectiveness of various strategies for preventing, abating and terminating current forms of conflict. Questions discussed include: Why do states go to war? How do they create a lasting peace? What role does morality play in foreign policy? What is our obligation to just peace or just war?NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Cross-listed: POLS 406.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History, third or fourth year standing, or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 411 HIST 411 - History Seminar (Historiography)

The study of history relies on the written and oral record of human experience. The use to which words have been put has varied over time ranging from the ancient world's innocent acceptance of recorded inventories and boastful heroic conquests, to the post-modern era where the text is not a bearer of truth but an instrument of power. This course traces the place of the text in the human effort to know and remember the past. Although the written text has been foundational for the study of the past, people have left other signs of their presence and we interact with other realities than the text. This course brings in additional disciplines including philosophy, literary criticism, biology, psychology, physics, and biblical studies.NB: Approved alternative to IDIS 400.Prerequisite(s): Enrolment priority given to fourth year History majors, concentrations, and minors; third and fourth year students with minimum of 6 sem. hrs. of History are considered. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
HIST 423 HIST 423 - History of the First World War

A seminar course involving an examination of the origins and course of the First World War. Primary focus on various campaigns and fronts of the war, and on specific issues such as the nature and impact of trench warfare, the domestic policies of the belligerent powers, and the social, economic, and political impact of the conflict.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including one of HIST 108, 112, 136; or 252; or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 424 HIST 424 - History of the Second World War

A seminar course involving an examination of the origins and course of the Second World War. Primary focus on main campaigns of the war in Europe and Asia, the domestic policies of the belligerent powers, and the social, economic, and political impact of the conflict.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including one of HIST 108, 112, 136; or 252. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00

*Program subject to final approval by the BC Ministry of Advanced Education