ID Course Credits
HIST 107 HIST 107 - World History to 1750: Ancient to Early Modern | 2020-2021

This course involves a general examination of primary themes in the history of the world's major civilizations from antiquity to the 18th Century. Although European realities will be examined, the focus of this course will be global in nature with an emphasis on systems of cultural and economic exchange and on the global nature of historical development. As a part of this process students are provided with the opportunity to use the historical method, including primary sources, to understand and write accounts of the past.

3.00
HIST 108 HIST 108 - World History from 1750 to 1945: Early Modern to Contemporary | 2020-2021

This course involves a general examination of primary themes in the history of the world's major civilizations from 1750 to decolonization. Although the continued growth of European influence will be examined, the primary focus of this course will be global in nature focusing on systems of cultural and economic exchange, as well as an investigation of non-European societies on their own terms, including their responses to the colonial experience and the factors which influenced the nature of post-colonial development. As a part of this process students are provided with the opportunity to use the historical method, including primary sources, to understand and write accounts of the past.

3.00
HIST 109 HIST 109 - World History Since 1945 | 2020-2021

An overview of the world's major civilizations since the last year of World War II, a period of profound 226 global transformation marked by the Cold War, the escalation of intra-state conflicts in the wake of the Cold War, and evolving ideas of human security.

3.00
HIST 111 HIST 111 - History of Western Civilization | 2020-2021

An exploration of the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from its beginnings in the ancient Near East to the birth of the modern era in the Renaissance and Reformation. Key themes that will be investigated include: the emergence of the first civilizations; the development of citizenship and philosophy; the growth and transformation of Christianity; the emergence of Islam; changes in gender roles and the family. As part of this exploration, students will use historical methods, with a focus on reading primary sources, to understand and describe the past.

3.00
HIST 112 HIST 112 - History of Western Civilization | 2020-2021

An exploration of the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from the mid-17th century to the mid-20th century. Key topics investigated include: the rise of absolutism; the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; the Industrial and French Revolutions; the development of new political ideologies, including liberalism, nationalism and socialism; changes in gender roles and the family; colonialism and imperialism; the origins and consequences of both World Wars, fascism, communism, and the Cold War. As part of this exploration, students will use historical methods, with a focus on reading primary sources, to understand and describe the past.

3.00
HIST 135 HIST 135 - Globalization, Co-Existence, and Identity | 2020-2021

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PreConfederation Canada; explores alternative forms of understanding Canada's past and the possibility of a history of relation; dialogues with indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing; reimagines Canada's past in the formation of identity and nationalism, colony and empire, and co-existence and partnership in local, national and global contexts. Considers how representations of Canada's past continue to shape relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, and Canada and the globe.

3.00
HIST 136 HIST 136 - All My Relations: Canada and the World after 1867 | 2020-2021

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PostConfederation Canada; explores alternative narratives from those of progressive nationalism and identity politics as informed by race, class, gender, ethnicity, and environmentalism and encourages a history of relation; dialogues with Indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing. Considers how Canada's past shaped (and continues to inform) relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, charter members and minorities, patriarchy and women, society and the environment, and Canada and the globe.

3.00
HIST 230 HIST 230 - History of Nursing | 2020-2021

This course examines the development of Canadian nursing over the past four centuries, with an emphasis on the 20th century. Based on an understanding of nursing as rooted in a Christian ethos of caring for strangers, this course critically explores the ways in which religion, politics, gender, race, economics, technology, culture, war, and epidemics have influenced the development of nursing both nationally and globally.

3.00
HIST 237 HIST 237 - Genocide, Reconciliation and Co-existence: Indigenous Nationhood and Canada | 2020-2021

The history of First Nations, Métis Nations and Inuit Nations in Canada from time immemorial through to the present from various perspectives gained from interactions with Indigenous authors and guest speakers and cultural experiences such as immersion trips to Indigenous territories. Engage broad economic, social and political themes associated with Canada's settler society and gain cultural intelligence by analyzing from an Indigenous perspective how standard narratives of progress shaped early encounters, the fur trade economy, governmental policy, Christianity and culture, residential schools, land reserves and selfgovernment. Considers the ways in which Indigenous nations utilized and reshaped Canada's historical narrative to resist assimilation, paternalism, "civilization"ť, marginalisation, and integration. Examines arguments for partnership, cooperation, negotiation and reconciliation in a movement towards peaceful co-existence.

3.00
HIST 302 HIST 302 - Greece and Rome: Leadership in the Ancient World RP | 2020-2021

A study of the most influential leadership in ancient Greece and Rome. Plutarch's biographical studies are the main focus. Various accounts of Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristotle, Xenophon, Livy, Sallust, Tacitus, and Suetonius are used as supplementary material.

3.00
HIST 304 HIST 304 - Late Medieval Europe | 2020-2021

An inquiry into a period of Europe's past in which beliefs, attitudes, and institutions, moulded in the previous centuries, were consolidated into shapes that mark modern European (and North American) culture. The outlines of the modern state and of the modern family. An examination of late medieval civilization for indications of decline and rebirth. Signs of struggle between forces of tradition and of innovation, idealism and material or corporeal realities, and gender relations.

3.00
HIST 306 HIST 306 - History of Economic Thought | 2020-2021

An investigation of the overlap of economic history and economic thought all the way from ancient Greeks philosophers, through medieval scholastics, to mercantilist businessmen, to Adam Smith and the classical economists of the Industrial Revolution, to macroeconomists emerging from the Great Depression, and into the Twenty-First century. Students examine the main economic questions and themes of these various periods including: What is the good life? Is business moral? How do selfish individuals promote societal good through markets? What is the proper role and scope of government? As an inquiry-based course, students will have considerable latitude to examine topics of particular interest to them in more detail.

3.00
HIST 307 HIST 307 - Renaissance Europe | 2020-2021

An examination of the social, intellectual, artistic, political, and economic transformations that gave rise to, and followed in, the wake of the "rebirth"ť of ancient Greek and Roman culture that began in Italy in the mid-14th century and spread to the rest of Europe for the next 200 years.

3.00
HIST 308 HIST 308 - Reformation Europe | 2020-2021

An examination of the social, intellectual, artistic, and political history of Western Europe from the 14th to the 17th century, with a special emphasis on changes in theology and devotional practices, and the ensuing wars of religion, as the Protestant and Catholic Reformations spread throughout Europe.

3.00
HIST 309 HIST 309 - The Age of Enlightenment | 2020-2021

An examination of the main events, individuals, and ideas in European history from 1600 to 1789. Key topics include: the growth of absolutism, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment; the development of new political and economic theories; artistic and cultural movements; the rise of the public sphere; religious revivals; and changes in marriage, the family and gender roles.

3.00
HIST 310 HIST 310 - History in Practice | 2020-2021

An exploration of the various manifestations of the practice of history in the public sphere. Students will be exposed to the ways in which communities, regions, nations, and others polities collect, manage, create, present and understand their histories, pasts, and stories. Analyze how forms of historical consciousness show themselves in archives and museums, films and theatrical productions, monuments and memorials, anniversaries and celebrations, government policies and sporting achievements, genealogy and national origin stories, etc. Practical application of historical skills and tools through communication with public historians, visits to local historic sites, completing relevant assignments and engaging experiential learning. Students will gain valuable experiences and knowledge related to a variety of areas where public history is practiced and will be exposed to career opportunities in history. This course is a prerequisite for other History Practicum opportunities

3.00
HIST 312 HIST 312 - Science and Technology in Global Perspective | 2020-2021

This course provides a survey of the history of science and technology from the ancient world to the present with particular emphasis on the early- modern and modern eras. While much of the focus is on developments in the Western world, this course also examines select issues and events in a comparative world perspective.

3.00
HIST 315 HIST 315 - History Practicum | 2020-2021

A supervised field experience designed to give students an opportunity to apply the skills and methodology of the discipline of history in a variety of settings so as to expose them to the broad range of contemporary applications for their formal education. Placements may take place in a variety of public settings including but not limited to: areas such as businesses and industry, government and public service, non-governmental organizations and international agencies, information management and preservation, resource management and land use, and education and training.

3.00
HIST 316 HIST 316 - History Practicum | 2020-2021

A supervised field experience designed to give students an opportunity to apply the skills and methodology of the discipline of history in a variety of settings so as to expose them to the broad range of contemporary applications for their formal education. Placements may take place in a variety of public settings including but not limited to: areas such as businesses and industry, government and public service, non-governmental organizations and international agencies, information management and preservation, resource management and land use, and education and training.

3.00
HIST 321 HIST 321 - Tudor-Stuart England | 2020-2021

An exploration of the history of England from the coming of the Tudors in the 15th century to the so called Glorious Revolution at the end of the 17th century. This was an eventful age, featuring the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the creativity of William Shakespeare, a bitterly fought civil war, and the development of a limited monarchy. Particular attention is paid to two developments that transformed English life: the religious reformations of the 16th century, and the civil war and political revolutions of the 17th century.

3.00
HIST 324 HIST 324 - 19th Century Europe | 2020-2021

This course examines the long 19th century from the French Revolution to the onset of the Great War. Explores key movements and themes in political, intellectual, and socio-economic history through lectures, discussion groups, and close readings of primary and secondary sources.

3.00
HIST 325 HIST 325 - 20th Century Europe | 2020-2021

This course involves an investigation of significant themes in the historical development of European society since 1914. Primary focus is on the issue of changing European perceptions of the nature of social organizations and of Europe's broader role in the international system. Topics include: the origin, nature, and effects of world war; the Russian Revolution and the rise of the Soviet state; the rise of Fascism and the emergence of "totalitarian"ť style movements; the construction of the Soviet empire in Eastern Europe and the emergence and ultimate resolution of the cold war; decolonization; and the rise of the welfare state and emergence of European federalism.

3.00
HIST 332 HIST 332 - Issues in the History of British Columbia | 2020-2021

The history of British Columbia from its earliest beginnings to the late 1980s. The province's move from regionalism, to provincialism, to internationalism by examining many of the social, cultural, political, and economic forces of change which shaped the "West Beyond the West"ť in Canada. Specific aspects of BC's history that particularly enlighten us about the character of the region, its unique place in Canadian history, and how these events have shaped the province today.

3.00
HIST 334 HIST 334 - Issues in Canadian Government and Politics | 2020-2021

Provides the student with a detailed examination of the political issues that divide and unite Canadians. Topics include: discussion of alternative theoretical approaches to Canadian politics; regionalism, citizenship, and political participation; the French- English Cleavage; provincialism versus federalism; aboriginal politics; gender and class issues; the uneasy relationship between the United States and Canada; multiculturalism and bilingualism as key indicators of Canadian political culture; the Executive in Parliament dispute; legislative politics and judicial interpretation; law and constitution.

3.00
HIST 335 HIST 335 - Development of the Canadian Constitution | 2020-2021

A survey of the historical development of the Canadian Constitution from 1867 to the present. The search for an amending formula and the patriation of the Constitution. The evolving nature of the federation; the Meech Lake Accord; the Charlottetown Accord; the October 26 Referendum; Western demands for major changes to the Senate and other national institutions of the federation, and the unfinished constitutional agenda. The profound effect on law and public policy development resulting from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

3.00
HIST 339 HIST 339 - Wilderness, Water and Global Warming: Canadian Environmental History | 2020-2021

A thematic case study approach to Canadian Environmental History that highlights the nation's unique reciprocal relationships with nature as illustrated through ideas (Wilderness), material resources (Water) and social/ethical issues (Global Warming). Investigates how "natural"ť elements like climate, topography, plants, animals and diseases have influenced our choices about nature, and how "cultural"ť content, like "clean/green"ť energy initiatives, pipeline projects, save the whale campaigns, and fear of climate change, have shaped our perceptions of the places we inhabit. Critically engages the ethical decisions we make about the environment that may determine the future we wish to construct as Canadian and global citizens.

3.00
HIST 340 HIST 340 - Issues in First Nations- Canadian Relations | 2020-2021

Explores specific events that have shaped the relationship between First Nations, Inuit and Metis and the Canadian state and have informed the interaction between indigenous peoples and settler society. Weekly seminars will cover topics such as the Indian Act, reserves, treaties, violence against indigenous women, residential schools, the Sixties Scoop, economic development and sustainability, crime and punishment, art and cultural representation, and activism and resurgence. The thematic approach will explore different visions for how indigenous communities and Canadian society can -live together in a good way."ť

3.00
HIST 348 HIST 348 - Religion in Canada | 2020-2021

Religious developments in Canada from the beginning of European settlement to today. The relationship between such developments and the political, economic, and social life of the country.

3.00
HIST 352 HIST 352 - Government and Politics of the United States | 2020-2021

An introduction to American politics, including the major branches of government: the presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court. The dynamics of American political institutions and their interaction. The prime emphasis is on national politics, especially the interaction of the executive and legislative, including presidential decision-making.

3.00
HIST 355 HIST 355 - American Foreign Policy | 2020-2021

A study of principle themes in United States foreign policy with in-depth review of post Second World War presidential periods. Students analyze the causes and results of American policy choices in the context of evolving world order. The course explores philosophy and leadership styles.

3.00
HIST 361 HIST 361 - History of Christianity I | 2020-2021

A study of the history of the Christian church from the turn of the first century to the eve of the 16th century Reformation, with attention to the persons, events and issues involved in the major developments of Christianity.

3.00
HIST 362 HIST 362 - History of Christianity II | 2020-2021

An examination of the development of the Christian church from the late medieval period through the early 21st century. Key topics include: the Protestant and Catholic reformations; the Great Awakenings and the rise of modern evangelism, fundamentalism, and the growth of modern missionary movements, along with a consideration of significant individuals, changes in theology, institutions, devotional practices, gender roles, and attempts to engage and shape culture.

3.00
HIST 366 HIST 366 - History of the Family after 1600 | 2020-2021

This course examines the historical development of the family beginning with the ancient world up to 1600. A central inquiry is the formation of families and households, as well as the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course also explores the use of power and coercion in the organization of family. It includes an inquiry into contemporary gender theory but concentrates on the lives and ideas of actual persons insofar as the historical record reveals them.

3.00
HIST 367 HIST 367 - History of the Family after 1600 | 2020-2021

An examination of the historical development of the family in the "modern"ť era. There is a central focus on the formation of families and households and the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course integrates contemporary gender theory, but concentrates on the lives and ideas of historical actors as they are revealed in the historical record.

3.00
HIST 371 HIST 371 - Africa Since 1500: From Precolonial to Colonial | 2020-2021

This course will involve an examination of the major themes of sub-Saharan African history from 1500 to the partition of Africa following the Berlin Conference of 1884. Primary emphasis will be on the nature of African societies and the political, social, and economic consequences of their interaction with Europe. Special attention will be given to issues such as the origins and nature of African societies; the rise and impact of the slavetrade; the growth of the European presence and the nature of European imperialism; and the onset of direct European colonial rule and the African response to it.

3.00
HIST 372 HIST 372 - History of Africa Since 1500 | 2020-2021

This course will involve a survey of Sub-Saharan African history since the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885. Primary emphasis will be on a variety of regions at various stages of their development, while exploring the roles of colonial power, emerging nationalisms and the politics of underdevelopment.

3.00
HIST 377 HIST 377 - 20th Century China and East Asia | 2020-2021

A cultural and political history of China and Japan since 1900 with an emphasis on late 20th century issues. Course includes discussion of Hong Kong and Taiwan as Chinese territories and Korea as a primary neighbour of China and Japan. Of special interest are the relations of Japan and China with the United States.

3.00
HIST 381 HIST 381 - The Arab Middle East in the 20th Century: The Politics of Identity | 2020-2021

An examination of some major theses in the history of the Arab Middle East since the breakup of the Ottoman Empire following World War I. The course examines the role played by issues of identity in the development of national structures in the Arab East (Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States). Themes include: the nature of the Islamic community, the structure and legacy of the Ottoman rule, postOttoman settlement and the impact of colonial rule, the emergence of nationalist politics and the growth of contemporary Arab state system, oil and the politics of family rule in the Gulf States, and the relationship between religion and politics.

3.00
HIST 382 HIST 382 - Palestine and the History of the Arab- Israeli Conflict | 2020-2021

A survey of the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The historical roots of the conflict, issues of land ownership and immigration, the development of national consciousness, and the process of state formation within both communities, impacts on the larger international community, and problems of peacemaking.

3.00
HIST 390 HIST 390 - Special Topics in History | 2020-2021

An examination of special topics or issues in history that are not considered in depth in other courses.

3.00
HIST 391 HIST 391 - Canadian Governmental Leadership | 2020-2021

In the setting of the historical Booth Mansion in Ottawa, students are invited to explore the history of Canadian political leadership. Using the historical method, including research in primary sources, they will evaluate the leadership of Canadian Prime Ministers and examine how they addressed the needs and crises of the nation. By means of their enquiries into Canada's political leadership, students will develop their own theories of effective leadership.

3.00
HIST 392 HIST 392 - Sugar,Slaves,Silver: Atlantic World | 2020-2021

This course examines the Atlantic world during an era of immense global change. Since the navigations of the 15th century, the Atlantic has been a corridor for fundamental exchanges of peoples, crops, technology, and ideas. Topics include: early maritime explorations, the destruction and reconfiguration of indigenous societies, the labour migrations of Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the establishment of an Atlantic economy, the maturation of EuroAmerican colonial societies and their struggles for autonomy and national independence.

3.00
HIST 400 HIST 400 - Directed Studies in History | 2020-2021

Independent but guided reading and research in a specialized area of history of interest to students.

3.00
HIST 403 HIST 403 - Engendered History | 2020-2021

This seminar examines specific topics in the history of gender throughout the period known loosely as the modern world. The course is designed to clarify the process through which ideas of gender evolved and the ways in which masculinity and femininity have been constructed and experienced in a global context. The seminar also examines group interactions across lines of race, class, ethnicity, region, and religion and the influence of groups striving to assert their own identities on ideas of gender.

3.00
HIST 406 HIST 406 - War, Peace and Society | 2020-2021

Examines the changing nature of, and approaches to, war and its effect on society from the ancient world to the present, including an assessment of various visions and proposals for peace. The course includes an assessment of historic and relatively recent armed conflicts, exploring the causes of contemporary conflict and some of its distinctive characteristics. It also evaluates the effectiveness of various strategies for preventing, abating and terminating current forms of conflict. Questions discussed include: Why do states go to war? How do they create a lasting peace? What role does morality play in foreign policy? What is our obligation to just peace or just war?

3.00
HIST 409 HIST 409 - Nature, Society, and History in Global Perspective | 2020-2021

Human interaction with the environment is the most fundamental of all relationships. This course examines the different ways in which societies have defined, understood, and used their nonhuman surroundings and the processes through which the environment influences culture and adapts to human communities. Students explore the historical context of the human-nature interaction in global perspective and compare the ways in which the concepts of politics, nationalism, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, etc. inform and guide the relationship.

3.00
HIST 411 HIST 411 - History, Culture, and Interpreting the Past | 2020-2021

The study of history relies on the written and oral record of human experience. The use to which words have been put has varied over time ranging from the ancient world's innocent acceptance of recorded inventories and boastful heroic conquests, to the postmodern era where the text is not a bearer of truth but an instrument of power. This course traces the place of the text in the human effort to know and remember the past. Although the written text has been foundational for the study of the past, people have left other signs of their presence and we interact with other realities than the text. This course brings in additional disciplines including philosophy, literary criticism, biology, psychology, physics, and biblical studies.

3.00
HIST 412 HIST 412 - Senior Thesis | 2020-2021

A program of independent readings and research on a specific topic leading to a written paper for students choosing the European area. A research project involving the use of primary sources, archives, etc., for those choosing the North American area.

3.00
HIST 423 HIST 423 - History of the First World War | 2020-2021

A seminar course involving an examination of the origins and course of the First World War. Primary focus on various campaigns and fronts of the war, and on specific issues such as the nature and impact of trench warfare, the domestic policies of the belligerent powers, and the social, economic, and political impact of the conflict.NB: Not offered every year See department chair.

3.00
HIST 424 HIST 424 - History of the Second World War | 2020-2021

A seminar course involving an examination of the origins and course of the Second World War. Primary focus on main campaigns of the war in Europe and Asia, the domestic policies of the belligerent powers, and the social, economic, and political impact of the conflict.

3.00
HIST 435 HIST 435 - Social History of Canada | 2020-2021

An examination of major developments in the society and culture of Canada with a particular spotlight on the diverse experience of the people who made Canada. The course highlights aspects of Canadian identity as seen through the lenses of gender, race, class, ethnicity, religion, and region. The focus is on the interaction between migrant groups and the host society, rural and urban societies, education and social reforms, labour and capital, and changing gender roles.

3.00
HIST 436 HIST 436 - Canadian and U.S. Relations | 2020-2021

A survey of relations between the two countries from their origins, ranging from military and diplomatic contacts to intellectual and cultural. Comparative developments in the two nations.

3.00
HIST 440 HIST 440 - The Evolution of Canadian Foreign Policy | 2020-2021

An overview of the formulation and trends of Canadian foreign policy in the period since Confederation. The domestic and external determinants of Canadian foreign policy, the nature of the foreign policy-making process, and the evolution of key themes in Canadian foreign policy.

3.00
HIST 471 HIST 471 - Missions and Imperialism in the Global Context | 2020-2021

This seminar-based course examines some of the major themes in the history of the West's colonial encounter with non-Western communities and the role played by Christian missions and missionaries in that process. Primary attention is given not only to the origins of, and complex inter-relationship between, the colonial encounter and the evangelical enterprise, but to the redefinition and reconstruction of Western and non-Western identities which emerged as a result of such interactions.

3.00
HIST 490 HIST 490 - Special Topics in History | 2020-2021

An examination of special topics or issues in history that are not considered in depth in other courses.

3.00
HIST 497 HIST 497 - Senior Thesis | 2020-2021

A 12,000-15,000 word thesis based on a review of the secondary literature and research in primary sources in archival, published, microform, microfiche, or electronic form, on an approved topic. An oral defence and a library-acceptable copy are required. Taken in fourth year by all Honours students in History.

3.00
HIST 498 HIST 498 - Senior Thesis | 2020-2021

A 12,000-15,000 word thesis based on a review of the secondary literature and research in primary sources in archival, published, microform, microfiche, or electronic form, on an approved topic. An oral defence and a library-acceptable copy are required. Taken in fourth year by all Honours students in History.

3.00