Code
Course Credits
PHIL 105 PHIL 105 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the major questions about existence and what it is to be human while providing some of the foundational philosophical responses to these questions. Topics to be discussed include: the relation between perception and knowledge (appearance and reality); the existence and nature of God; human freedom and determinism; the meaning of human existence; the nature of moral judgments; the mind-body problem; artificial intelligence; feminist philosophy; the problem of suffering; and whether humans are capable of selfless motivation. Students will be encouraged to interpret and reflect upon the meaning of the relation between reason and faith as the joint foundation for addressing these questions in a logical and ethical manner.

Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0; 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 304 PHIL 304 - Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas

This course studies key texts from Thomas Aquinas. The focus is on the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, but special attention is paid to his commentaries on Aristotle and on his Christian interpretation of ancient philosophy. The challenge that modern science and modern philosophy presents to Thomistic metaphysics is also discussed, with special attention paid to the highly influential critique made by Immanuel Kant.NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of Philosophy. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
PHIL 305 PHIL 305 - Philosopy of the Human Person

This course addresses what it means to say that human beings are persons having freedom and subjectivity; examines the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving; studies the difference between body and soul, as well as the unity of the two in humans; and explores the question of the immortality of the soul. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of Philosophy. (3-0; 0-0)

3.00
PHIL 313 PHIL 313 - British Empiricism

A study of British empiricism in the 17th and 18th centuries. Selected writings of Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume are read and discussed.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Philosophy. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 315 PHIL 315 - Kant

A study of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, focusing primarily on Kant's seminal work, Critique of Pure Reason.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of Philosophy. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 333 PHIL 333 - Philosophy and Literature

This course surveys major ancient, medieval, modern, and postmodern approaches that attempt a theory of literature. The course places modern and postmodern theories in historical perspective by reading key ancient and medieval authors. In particular, resources from the Latin Scholastic tradition most relevant to contemporary debates about literary theory are highlighted.NB: Not offered every year.Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of Philosophy.

3.00
PHIL 350 PHIL 350 - Symbolic Logic

A study of the propositional calculus, quantification theory, the theory of definite descriptions, and other topics in modern symbolic logic.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): PHIL 103 or instructor's consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 412 PHIL 412 - Issues in Contemporary Philosophy

Central issues arising in 20th century philosophy, particularly within the Anglo-American analytic movement. Recent topics have included the rise and demise of logical positivism, the philosophy of Wittgenstein, Rorty's attack on the Mirror of Nature, and issues raised by continental European philosophy.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of Philosophy and third year standing. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 470 PHIL 470 - Phil. of Knowledge &Rational Belief

A descriptive and critical inquiry into the theory of knowledge, including such topics as foundationalism, relativism, evidence, warrant, cognitive reliability, skepticism, and the relationship of cognitive science and psychology to philosophical accounts of knowledge and rational inquiry.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of Philosophy and third year standing. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
PHIL 490 PHIL 490 - Philosophy of Mind

A study of the mind-body problems through consideration of various philosophical theories on the nature of human consciousness. The relevance of mystical and religious experience, of parapsychological phenomena, and of neurophysiological findings to the mind-body problem.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of Philosophy or third year standing.

3.00