ID Course Credits
RELS 100 RELS 100 - Introduction to Christianity

RELS 100 is designed to be preliminary to either RELS 101 or 102, and is shaped for first or second year students who are not Religious Studies majors. This course serves as an introduction to the foundational documents, persons, and events of Christianity. Class sessions are specifically designed for students who are unfamiliar with the biblical, theological and historical narrative of Christianity and with the role that it has played in the development of western culture.

3.00
RELS 101 RELS 101 - Introduction to Old Testament Studies

An introduction to the major writings of the New Testament (Synoptic Gospels, Pauline, and Johannine Writings), including an orientation to the field of New Testament studies in the same areas as under RELS 101.

3.00
RELS 102 RELS 102 - Introduction to New Testament Studies

An introduction to the major writings of the New Testament (Synoptic Gospels, Pauline, and Johannine Writings), including an orientation to the field of New Testament studies in the same areas as under RELS 101.

3.00
RELS 160 RELS 160 - Introduction to Theology

What do Christians believe about God and what are their grounds for holding these beliefs? Introduction to Christian theology places Christian theology in the broader context of religion and invites students to consider their own beliefs in the context of the broader Christian theological tradition and to explore their relationship to scripture, tradition, experience, and reason. Students are encouraged to consider the importance and relevance of Christian theology in academic and ecclesial contexts with special to spiritual formation.

3.00
RELS 222 RELS 222 - Israelite Religion

A study of the New Testament writings in their historical setting and chronological sequence with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity.

3.00
RELS 224 RELS 224 - New Testament Theology

A study of the New Testament writings in their historical setting and chronological sequence with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity.

3.00
RELS 235 RELS 235 - Elementary New Testament Greek

This course comprises an introduction to Hellenistic (Koiné) Greek that is designed to prepare the student for reading the Greek New Testament with linguistic aptitude, as well as developing a cultural intelligence pertaining to the ancient people and history that gave rise to the biblical text. Students will explore and investigate linguistic theories and ideas related to the script, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament, as well as evaluate and compare differences and similarities that exist between the Ancient Greco-Roman and Jewish cultures and our own contemporary culture.

3.00
RELS 245 RELS 245 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew

An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, designed to prepare the student for serious study of the Hebrew Bible as an item of both ancient and ongoing cultural, historical, and theological significance.

3.00
RELS 271 RELS 271 - Western World Religions

An analytical and critical study of the phenomena, the conceptual patterns, and the sacred texts of some of the major Western religions. Each religion is studied as a total perspective for life, which is embodied in interpersonal and communal life, in cult, and in ideology. This course provides a general introduction to the study of world religions as well as an historical and structural survey of Judaism, Islam, Christianity and new religions in the West. The subject matter is approached from an emic anthropological standpoint—that is, the history, belief and practice of each religious group will be examined in detail, as if the student was living within that religious context.

3.00
RELS 272 RELS 272 - Eastern World Religions

An analytical and critical study of the phenomena, the conceptual patterns, and the sacred texts of some of the major Eastern religions. Each religion is studied as a total perspective for life, which is embodied in interpersonal and communal life, in cult, and in ideology.

3.00
RELS 285 RELS 285 - Introduction to Missions

This course introduces basic concepts in missiology. Foundational notions from Old Testament and New Testament theology of missions are explored. As well, this course considers the rise and development of the missionary movement from apostolic times to the present. Issues arising from applied anthropology as it relates to cross-cultural communication are also developed. Special emphasis is given to discussion of important trends and select strategies in contemporary world mission.

3.00
RELS 300 RELS 300 - Princip. of Biblical Interpretation

A study of the principles of biblical interpretation used in both the Jewish and Christian traditions, including the application of these methods to the major literary genres of the Bible.

3.00
RELS 311 RELS 311 - History of Ancient Israel

A study of the various eras of the history of the Hebrew people in the Old Testament period, including a survey of attempted historical reconstructions. Attention is given to such features as pre-history, nationalism, government, and social institutions.

3.00
RELS 320 RELS 320 - Dead Sea Scrolls

A survey of the literary, social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) and their role in recovering the historical development of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and early Jewish and Christian identities in antiquity.

3.00
RELS 329 RELS 329 - Elementary New Testament Greek

A continuing study of Koine Greek that is designed to prepare the student for reading the Greek New Testament.

3.00
RELS 331 RELS 331 - Readings in the Greek New Testament

A reading of selected texts from the New Testament, including a study of Greek syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

3.00
RELS 332 RELS 332 - Readings in the Greek New Testament

A reading of selected texts from the New Testament, including a study of Greek syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

3.00
RELS 336 RELS 336 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew

A continuing study of the grammar and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, designed to prepare the student for serious reading and study of the Hebrew Bible.

3.00
RELS 337 RELS 337 - Readings in the Hebrew Bible

A reading of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible, including a study of Hebrew syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

3.00
RELS 338 RELS 338 - Readings in the Hebrew Bible

A reading of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible, including a study of Hebrew syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology.

3.00
RELS 340 RELS 340 - Current Issues in Biblical Theology

An examination of the topics currently being discussed in biblical theology, such as the possibility and methodology of a biblical theology, apocalyptic and eschatology, covenant and election, redemption and freedom, worship, church, the righteousness of God, history, society, law and gospel, faith, canon, life and death, suffering, creation, atonement and reconciliation, sin and guilt, wisdom, and worldview.

3.00
RELS 341 RELS 341 - The Pentateuch

A study of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible with special reference to introduction, exegesis, and history. Attention is given to their historical and theological significance for both Judaism and Christianity.

3.00
RELS 342 RELS 342 - Psalms and Wisdom Literature

An introduction to the place, function, and form of the Psalms and wisdom literature within the context of other ancient Near Eastern literature, including an analysis of selected examples such as Job, Ecclesiastes, and Proverbs.

3.00
RELS 343 RELS 343 - Issues in Contemporary Culture

This course examines a number of significant
issues currently under discussion by both
academics and thinking people in western culture
in the light of key biblical texts relating to them.
Issues will include: postmodernism, relativism,
pluralism, and cultural diversity, tolerance, truth,
euthanasia, stem cell research and the perceived
connection between violence and religion.

3.00
RELS 351 RELS 351 - Life and Teaching of Jesus

A study of the life of Jesus through the eyes of the four evangelists, with special reference to Jesus' teaching on God, man, the Kingdom, righteousness, and prayer. An evaluation of the extra-biblical view of the person of Jesus.

3.00
RELS 352 RELS 352 - Life and Letters of Paul

A study of the world, life, and mission of Paul, including an analysis of the central message of the Pauline epistles in their historical setting and chronological order.

3.00
RELS 360 RELS 360 - Christian Apologetics

A study of the nature and methods of defending the Christian faith including an examination of the evidence for and the arguments against a Christian worldview.

3.00
RELS 361 RELS 361 - History of Christianity I

A study of the history of the Christian Church from the turn of the first century to the eve of the 16th century Reformation with attention to the persons, events, and issues involved in the major developments of Christianity.

3.00
RELS 362 RELS 362 - History of Christianity II

An examination of the development of the Christian Church from the late medieval period through to the early 21st century. Key topics include: the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the Great Awakenings and the rise of modern Evangelicalism, Fundamentalism, and the growth of modern missionary movements, along with a consideration of significant individuals, changes in theology, institutions, devotional practices, gender roles, and attempts to engage and shape culture.

3.00
RELS 364 RELS 364 - The Expansion of Christianity in the Two-thirds World

The expansion of Christianity in the non-Western world from the first century to the present. Attention is given to critiquing those factors that hindered or enhanced the expansion of Christianity during specific eras.

3.00
RELS 365 RELS 365 - Christian Moral Theology

Moral theology reflects upon the goodness and evil of human acts, and of the person who performs them, in the light of Divine Revelation and human reason. This course offers an introduction both to mainstream Catholic and evangelical moral theology and contemporary moral issues, emphasizing their common ground and supplementary insights as well as explaining their continuing points of divergence. The course is taught by a Catholic professor, utilizing both Catholic and protestant texts. Specific moral issues to be discussed include abortion, homosexuality, just war, contraception, divorce, euthanasia, poverty and hunger, and the nature and role of the family.

3.00
RELS 366 RELS 366 - Theology of the Body

This course reviews the roots and evolution of the modern secular approaches to anthropology and human sexuality and contrast them with those of Christ. This course examines recent developments in theological reflection on the body (John Paul II's theology of the body) and provides a general introduction to Christian anthropology, with particular attention to themes such as creation in the imago Dei, fall and redemption, nature and grace, freedom and rationality, gender and vocation. Due note of convergent and divergent doctrinal positions held by various Christian traditions of the themes are reviewed.

3.00
RELS 371 RELS 371 - Sociology of Religion

An introduction to the theories and concepts utilized by sociologists to interpret religious behaviour and the organization of religion.

3.00
RELS 375 RELS 375 - Christian Apologetics of CS Lewis

This course provides a detailed study of the theological and apologetic writings of C.S.Lewis. The instructor presents the Christian worldview of Lewis, as well as limitations and problems that may be inherent in his theological vision. The relevance of Lewis' writings to the task of ecumenical theological dialogue is a recurrent theme.

3.00
RELS 380 RELS 380 - Cross Cultural/Missions Practicum

A supervised short-term missions/cross-cultural internship/practicum.

2.00
RELS 381 RELS 381 - Contemporary Christianity

Students are invited to investigate some of the most significant theologians and theologies of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries with a view toward how they influence Christianity today. The approach is both inter-confessional and international in scope and seeks to allow students to grapple with important theological issues in local, national, and global contexts.

3.00
RELS 382 RELS 382 - Catholic Church: Theology & Practic

This course focuses on the theological, liturgical, and spiritual traditions that undergird the Catholic Church and which continue to form her self-understanding. Historically, this course explains and evaluates the development of the Catholic doctrine of the Church in terms of its roots in Scripture and Tradition, and with a particular emphasis on the Pauline understanding of the Church as the Body of Christ, and selected readings from the Church Fathers, as well as developments in Catholic understanding of the Church in different historical periods and social contexts. It also examines the Church in terms of her ongoing mission to the contemporary world implied by Catholic doctrine. Spiritually, this course exams the distinctive teaching of the Second Vatican Council's 'universal call to holiness' which ultimately serves to integrate doctrine and life in each member of the Church. Analysis of these themes are undertaken in dialogue with the perspectives of other Christian traditions, and in the light of the constructive critique they can offer.

3.00
RELS 384 RELS 384 - Religion, Contextualization, and Culture Change

A study of the history of contextualization from biblical to modern times, exploring significant models and paradigms of prominent thinkers and evaluating these adaptations and innovations. Also, the social and spiritual dynamics of culture change are examined, with a view to analyzing those processes which help to make the Gospel relevant in the constantly changing world in which we live.

3.00
RELS 386 RELS 386 - Global Theologies

This course seeks to extend the study of theology to the manner in which non-Western communities of Christians endeavour to shape their world by their faith. Special emphasis is given to examining Christology and Soteriology from a cross-cultural perspective and to the manner by which both Western and non-Western traditions may interact to enrich hermeneutics, missiology, and biblical and systematic theology.

3.00
RELS 387 RELS 387 - ChrstnTheol in Ecumenical Dialogue

A survey and analysis of the main achievements of the ecumenical theological dialogue process among the Christian churches, and the significant challenges still facing that dialogue today. This course utilizes texts from Catholic, Protestant Evangelical, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican sources, and guest lecturers from Catholic, Evangelical, and Orthodox traditions.

3.00
RELS 399 RELS 399 - Catholic Spirituality

An analysis of the teachings on prayer and the devout life of Catholic spiritual writers whose teachings still enrich the life of the Church today: especially St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Bonaventure, St. Francis De Sales, St. Therese of Lisieux, and the Venerable John Henry Newman. This course includes an overview of controversial topics such as the rise of Centering Prayer, the New Age movement, and an analysis of the teachings of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and reflections on the Catholic Tradition of Spirituality from non-Catholic perspectives.

3.00
RELS 415 RELS 415 - Intertestamental Literature

A study of the intertestamental Judaic literature, noting the relationships between this literature and the Old Testament and New Testament and showing how this literature serves as an important background for the study of the New Testament documents.

3.00
RELS 423 RELS 423 - Apocalyptic Literature

A study of the origin, form, and function of apocalyptic literature as well as important motifs and themes.

3.00
RELS 425 RELS 425 - Pauline Theology

A survey of the general contours of Paul’s thinking and a closer examination of one particular aspect of his theology, such as the origins of his gospel, the problem of coherence and contingency, his apostleship, his missionary 403 TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY | Academic Calendar 2019-20 strategy, his Christology, or the theology of one of his letters.

3.00
RELS 446 RELS 446 - Hebrew Prophets

An introduction to the origin, function, and meaning of the Hebrew prophets through a survey of the prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible, including a discussion of the relationship to the historical periods in which they were composed and their theological significance within Judaism and Christianity.

3.00
RELS 448 RELS 448 - Ancient Near East and the Old Testament

A study of selected ancient Near Eastern texts and their relevance for the exegesis of the Old Testament.

3.00
RELS 449 RELS 449 - Old Testament Seminar

This course is a study of selected topics that are currently under examination in the field of Old Testament studies.

3.00
RELS 453 RELS 453 - Synoptic Gospels and Acts

A study of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, focusing on the gospel form and the message of the individual gospels in their historical context. In addition, the Acts of the Apostles is considered with a view to better understanding the Church's birth and expansion.

3.00
RELS 454 RELS 454 - Johannine Writings

An introductory study of the major historical and literary problems of the writings traditionally ascribed to John: the Gospel of John, Johannine Epistles, and the Book of Revelation. In addition, attention is given to their thought and symbolism.

3.00
RELS 456 RELS 456 - New Testament Seminar

A study of selected topics that are currently under examination in the field of New Testament studies.

3.00
RELS 460 RELS 460 - Current Issues & Trends in Missions

Current missiological themes are studied such as: Missio Dei, Salvation Today, social justice and mission, meaning of evangelism and evangelization, contextualization, liberation themes, missions as inculturation, missions as an ecumenical expression, mobilizing the laity for missions, missions as a theology, and missions as an eschatological hope. The course also examines shifting missiological paradigms within the Conciliar Movement and Evangelical responses.

3.00
RELS 465 RELS 465 - Infl Thinkers in Christian Traditio

An introduction to some seminal figures in the Western Christian tradition. The course investigates their thought and intellectual contributions within their socio-political context and experience.

3.00
RELS 467 RELS 467 - The Theology of Karl Barth

This course is an examination and deeper understanding of Karl Barth's theology. Primary attention is given to the character, development, and significance of Barth's theology. The student also reads Karl Barth in the context of Christian thought.

3.00
RELS 470 RELS 470 - Psychology of Religion

An application of the tools of empirical psychology to the study of the development and function of religious experience. An analysis of the role of religious experience in the human personality. Specific religious experiences (e.g. conversion, prayer, glossolalia, miracles) are examined with a view to understanding their function in the normal individual.

3.00
RELS 473 RELS 473 - Theological Vision of John Paul II

This course takes an in-depth look at the theological vision of the two most influential Catholic theologians of the second Christian millennium: St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II. The main features of St. Thomas's synthesis of Christian thought, especially as found in his great Summa Theologiae, is explored. This is followed by an examination of the personalist Thomism of Pope John Paul II, and his program for the renewal of the Catholic Faith, especially as found in selected encyclicals and apostolic letters. The vision and worldview of St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II are presented as significant and enduring achievements of Christian thought.

3.00
RELS 475 RELS 475 - Christianity and Culture

How do Christians past and present relate to culture? Students are invited to examine some important aspects of Christianity’s involvement in Western culture. Alternative models and historical examples of this involvement are considered as well as some specific current issues related to Christian cultural activity.

3.00
RELS 476 RELS 476 - Christian World views in Historical and Cultural Context

What is Worldview in relation to Theology? How does it influence us and others? Students are invited to explore the nature and scope of Christian worldview as we investigate some of the salient moments in the history of Christian worldview thinking and its contemporary expressions. We will inquire into implications of Christ’s lordship for various spheres of life, such as politics, art, science and the environment. We investigate and develop personal responses to the challenges for a Christian worldview in today’s pluralist society. Students are encouraged to analyze their own worldview in order to critically interact with a view toward understanding how it affects relationships in society and the world. 

3.00
RELS 477 RELS 477 - NT Canon: Development & Theology

Investigates the theological implications of the historical development of the New Testament canon. Stress is laid upon the contextual reading of primary source evidence and its interpretation in important secondary source literature. New Testament canon development is explored as it relates to the Rule of Faith, the early councils, creeds, and the church fathers. These relationships are then investigated with a view toward how they influence our understanding of Scripture in the 21st century.

3.00
RELS 480 RELS 480 - Directed Studies

Independent but guided research in a specialized area of interest to student. RELS 400 designates biblical content courses; RELS 480, theological/cultural emphases.

3.00
RELS 482 RELS 482 - Historical Perspectives on Reformation and Post-Reformation Thought

A re-evaluation of the issues involved in the origin of the 16th century Protestant Reformation and the subsequent development of Calvinist thought: justification by faith, covenant theology, and election. An analysis of why Calvinists and Arminians were unable to overcome their differences, and how Reformed scholasticism went beyond John Calvin’s insights.

3.00
RELS 488 RELS 488 - Special Topics in Missiology

An examination of special topics or issues in Missiology that are not considered in depth in other courses.

3.00
RELS 490 RELS 490 - Christianity and Natural Sciences

Presentation and discussion of special topics concerned with the relationship between science and the Christian faith.

1.00