ID Course Credits
GENV 111 GENV 111 - Human Geography and Global Change

An introduction to human geography and the notion of globalization by exploring some of the major economic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and technological changes that have recently occurred at the global level and are shaping local places. The course is designed to provide students with better understanding of the variation, interaction, and interdependence of places, regions, people and their environments in a globalizing world; and to demonstrate how human geographers might consider and examine the concepts, forces, processes, issues, and ideas that are associated with global transformation.

3.00
GENV 212 GENV 212 - Urbanization Issues of Developing Countries

This course explores urbanization processes in developing countries, particularly in urban settings across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It provides a geographic perspective on the socio-economic, political, cultural, and environmental conditions under which cities of the Third World are rapidly growing and their relation to globalization issues. Case studies from selected areas examine such problems as unemployment, inadequate health services, housing shortages, and inadequate urban infrastructure.

3.00
GENV 230 GENV 230 - Geography of Canada

This course describes and explores Canada’s physical and human geography focusing on the regional distribution of natural features and resources, population and settlements, economic activities and development, and cultural change. It emphasizes the diversity and interrelationships between the physical and human landscapes which have evolved over time, creating the identifiable regions and subregions within the country.

3.00
HIST 135 HIST 135 - Globalization, Co-Existence, and Identity

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PreConfederation Canada; explores alternative forms of understanding Canada’s past and the possibility of a history of relation; dialogues with indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing; reimagines Canada’s past in the formation of identity and nationalism, colony and empire, and co-existence and partnership in local, national and global contexts. Considers how representations of Canada’s past continue to shape relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, and Canada and the globe.

3.00
HIST 136 HIST 136 - All My Relations: Canada and the World after 1867

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PostConfederation Canada; explores alternative narratives from those of progressive nationalism and identity politics as informed by race, class, gender, ethnicity, and environmentalism and encourages a history of relation; dialogues with Indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing. Considers how Canada’s past shaped (and
continues to inform) relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, charter members and minorities, patriarchy and women, society and the environment, and Canada and the globe.

3.00