Code
Course Credits
BIOL 103 BIOL 103 - Introduction to Biology I – Ecology and Biodiversity

An introduction to basic concepts and connections in the study of life, with emphasis on ecology and adaptation of representative life forms. The major plant and animal groups are surveyed with emphasis on unifying elements and diversities. This course is designed for non-Science majors and, without BIOL 104 and 105, does not serve as a prerequisite for upper level Biology courses.Prerequisite(s): None. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 113 BIOL 113 - Principles of Biology I

An introduction to the basic relationships governing the existence of all living organisms, with emphasis on ecology and adaptation of representative life forms. Consideration is given to classification and surveys of the major plant and animal groups with emphasis on unifying elements and diversities.Prerequisite(s): Biology 11 or 12 or equivalent. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 114 BIOL 114 - Principles of Biology II

An introduction to the basic relationships governing the existence of all living organisms. Consideration is given to the anatomy and physiology at all levels as these relate to the energy requirements, inheritance, reproduction, development, and adaptation of representative life forms.Prerequisite(s): Biology 11 or 12 equivalent. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 223 BIOL 223 - Cell Biology

A study of the molecules and processes that determine cell structure and function, including how this information is derived from the wide range of visual and analytical tools available today. The course describes the chemical nature of cells and the structure and behaviour of cells in the context of tissuesNB: Students taking BIOL 223 are urged to take CHEM 221 (Organic Chemistry) concurrently in order to be prepared to take BIOL 384 or 386.Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; and CHEM 103, 104; CHEM 103, 112 or CHEM 111, 112. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 241 BIOL 241 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I

An introductory course in human anatomy and physiology focusing on the structure and function of the cellular, histological, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic systems. Special attention will be given to the interaction of these systems in maintenance of homeostasis and adaptations during performance and disease conditions.Pre-requisite(s): none (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 315 BIOL 315 - Plant Physiology

An inventory of basic plant mechanisms and plant development. Mechanisms include assimilation, transport, and utilization of water and mineral nutrients and the utilization and distribution of photoassimilates. Plant development includes cell division, tissue culture, meristems, and the role of hormones in plant morphogenesis. Experimental approaches and biotechnology applications of plant molecular biology are stressed.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; BIOL 223 recommended. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 333 BIOL 333 - Introduction to Medical Microbiolog

A study of pathogenic microorganisms and the control of infectious diseases. Topics include (i) the biology of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminths; (ii) infectious diseases of temperate and tropical climates; (iii) immunity, immunology, and immunization; (iv) sterilization, disinfection, chemotherapeutic agents; and (v) epidemiology and public health microbiology.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; or BIOL 241, 242 (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 336 BIOL 336 - Immunology

A lecture course covering current topics in immunology including the cellular basis of immunity, the molecular genetics of antibody diversity, the major histocompatibility complex, antigen recognition, lymphocyte development, the complement system, hypersensitivity reactions, and immunodeficiency diseases. The course provides an integrated view of the immune system and the immunologic response to disease.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 223; BIOL 333 recommended. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 343 BIOL 343 - Human Histology

A study of the normal microscopic anatomy of the various tissues and organs of the body with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. Special attention is given to the field of human histology with some discussion of the similarities and differences in animals. The laboratory component of the course involves the observation and discussion of representative tissue sections and provides a basic understanding of normal versus abnormal morphology.NB: offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; BIOL 223 recommended. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 360 BIOL 360 - Invertebrate Zoology

A survey of the invertebrate phyla with particular reference to their phylogenetic relationships. Laboratories and field trips provide hands-on experience studying both terrestrial and marine invertebrates of the Pacific coastal region.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 371 BIOL 371 - Introduction to Genetics

An introduction to the study of heredity. Emphasizes classic genetics of populations and individuals in viruses, bacteria, plants, and animals.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114. (3-4; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 372 BIOL 372 - Molecular Genetics

This class considers modern developments and techniques in genetics, especially the basic and applied aspects of recombinant DNA technology.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105 or BIOL 113, 114; a minimum grade of C in BIOL 223; and CHEM 103, 104; or 103, 112; or 111, 112. CHEM 221, 222 and BIOL 371 recommended. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 381 BIOL 381 - General Ecology

A study of the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Consideration of plant and animal populations in relation to physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting their interaction and productivity. Considerable laboratory time is devoted to the study of local ecosystems, field sampling techniques, and field trips to ecological research stations.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; or equivalent. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 384 BIOL 384 - Principles of Biochemistry

The chemical structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. This class is continued as BIOL 386.Cross-listed: CHEM 384.Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 222.Recommended: BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; 223. (3-1-3; 0-0-0)

3.00
BIOL 386 BIOL 386 - Biosynthesis

The modern understanding of the biochemical transfer of genetic information: DNA structure and synthesis, transcription and translation. This course also examines the regulatory mechanisms of gene control in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, as well as protein structure and function. The central theme of the course is to illustrate the significance of nucleic acid and protein biochemistry in modern biology.Cross-listed: CHEM 386.Prerequisites:CHEM 221, 222.Recommended: BIOL 103, 104 and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; 223; 384 (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 411 BIOL 411 - Senior Thesis

Research in a chosen area of Biology with a final written report. Students present research findings in a seminar. Allows students with larger projects to gain extra credit.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 409, a related directed study in preparation, or instructor's consent. (0-0; 1-3)

3.00