Code
Course Credits
BIOL 103 BIOL 103 - Introduction to Biology I

An introduction to basic concepts and connections in the study of life, with emphasis on ecology and adaptation of representative life forms. The major plant and animal groups are surveyed with emphasis on unifying elements and diversities. This course is designed for non-Science majors and, without BIOL 104 and 105, does not serve as a prerequisite for upper level Biology courses.Prerequisite(s): None. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 104 BIOL 104 - Introduction to Biology II

An introduction to the basic relationships governing the existence of all living organisms. The anatomy and physiology at all levels from DNA to organ-systems are studied, looking at energy requirements, inheritance, reproduction, development, and adaptation of representative life forms. This course is designed for non-Science majors and, without BIOL 105, does not serve as a prerequisite for upper level Biology courses.Prerequisite(s): None. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 113 BIOL 113 - Principles of Biology I

An introduction to the basic relationships governing the existence of all living organisms, with emphasis on ecology and adaptation of representative life forms. Consideration is given to classification and surveys of the major plant and animal groups with emphasis on unifying elements and diversities.Prerequisite(s): Biology 11 or 12 or equivalent. (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 114 BIOL 114 - Principles of Biology II

An introduction to the basic relationships governing the existence of all living organisms. Consideration is given to the anatomy and physiology at all levels as these relate to the energy requirements, inheritance, reproduction, development, and adaptation of representative life forms.Prerequisite(s): Biology 11 or 12 equivalent. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 290 BIOL 290 - Introduction to Biotechnology

This course reviews the role of modern biotechnology in plant, animal, and marine biology, microbiology, agriculture, the pharmaceutical industry and medicine. The course focuses on underlying technologies in biotechnology, how these technologies are implemented, together with public concerns and government guidelines and legislation.Cross-listed: BIOT 290.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105 or BIOL 113, 114. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 333 BIOL 333 - Introduction to Medical Microbiolog

A study of pathogenic microorganisms and the control of infectious diseases. Topics include (i) the biology of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminths; (ii) infectious diseases of temperate and tropical climates; (iii) immunity, immunology, and immunization; (iv) sterilization, disinfection, chemotherapeutic agents; and (v) epidemiology and public health microbiology.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; or BIOL 241, 242 (3-3; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 336 BIOL 336 - Immunology

A lecture course covering current topics in immunology including the cellular basis of immunity, the molecular genetics of antibody diversity, the major histocompatibility complex, antigen recognition, lymphocyte development, the complement system, hypersensitivity reactions, and immunodeficiency diseases. The course provides an integrated view of the immune system and the immunologic response to disease.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 223; BIOL 333 recommended. (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 371 BIOL 371 - Introduction to Genetics

An introduction to the study of heredity. Emphasizes classic genetics of populations and individuals in viruses, bacteria, plants, and animals.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105; or BIOL 113, 114. (3-4; 0-0)

3.00
BIOL 372 BIOL 372 - Molecular Genetics

This class considers modern developments and techniques in genetics, especially the basic and applied aspects of recombinant DNA technology.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105 or BIOL 113, 114; a minimum grade of C in BIOL 223; and CHEM 103, 104; or 103, 112; or 111, 112. CHEM 221, 222 and BIOL 371 recommended. (0-0; 3-3)

3.00
BIOL 386 BIOL 386 - Biosynthesis

The modern understanding of the biochemical transfer of genetic information: DNA structure and synthesis, transcription and translation. This course also examines the regulatory mechanisms of gene control in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, as well as protein structure and function. The central theme of the course is to illustrate the significance of nucleic acid and protein biochemistry in modern biology.Cross-listed: CHEM 386.Prerequisites:CHEM 221, 222.Recommended: BIOL 103, 104 and 105; or BIOL 113, 114; 223; 384 (0-0; 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 390 BIOL 390 - Biology & Christian Theology

This course is designed to untangle some of the actual or perceived dissonance between issues of biological science and Christian theology. Six major topics are addressed: (1) models, analogies, and metaphors in science and Christian theology; (2) scientific and religious investigations of the biosphere; (3) defining human nature; (4) defining non-human nature; (5) caring for the earth; and (6) the biomedical revolution. The common threads among these topics are the tension between Christian faith and the findings of basic and applied biology (biotechnology), and the call to action required in a faith-based view of creation. As well as speaking from their own disciplines and background, the course instructors take part in panel discussions at t he end of each of the six units to foster discussion and dialogue on the issues. Student participation is encouraged by group projects that develop and present a paper on an area that engenders dissonance between scientific and religious worldview perspectives.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Cross-listed: BIOT 390.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105 or BIOL 113, 114; third year standing. (3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
BIOL 470 BIOL 470 - Introduction to Bioinformatics

An overview of the interdisciplinary science of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics which applies the tools of information technology (computer hardware and software) to analyze biological data such as gene or protein sequences. This course examines the theory of bioinformatics as well as its practical application to biological problems using approaches such as BLAST searches, phylogenetics, and protein structure function analysis.Cross-listed: BIOT 470NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 223; BIOL/CHEM 372, and either 3 sem. hrs. of Computing Science or MATH 102. (0-0; 3-3-0)

3.00
BIOT 100 BIOT 100 - Biotechnology Practicum

This hands-on course is part of an intern program in the Biology Department at TWU designed to provide instruction in general laboratory procedures and laboratory safety beyond that required during regular undergraduate laboratories. Performed tasks are evaluated and occur in the areas of animal husbandry, general laboratory maintenance, cell culture, histochemistry, light microscopy and protein chemistry (i.e. Western blotting, SDS-PAGE). Students will also acquire general instruction in Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) and Good Animal Practice (GAP).Prerequisites/Co-requisites: BIOL 103/104/105 or BIOL 113/114. (0-0, 0-1)

1.00
BIOT 290 BIOT 290 - Introduction to Biotechnology

This course reviews the role of modern biotechnology in plant, animal, and marine biology, microbiology, agriculture, the pharmaceutical industry and medicine. The course focuses on underlying technologies in biotechnology, how these technologies are implemented, together with public concerns and government guidelines and legislation.Crosslisted: BIOL 290Prerequisite(s): BIOL 103, 104, and 105 or BIOL 113, 114.

3.00

*Program subject to final approval by the BC Ministry of Advanced Education