ID Course Credits
THTR 101 THTR 101 - Production

Students must fulfil assigned technical crew responsibilities during the semester.

1.00
THTR 102 THTR 102 - Production

Students must fulfil assigned technical crew responsibilities during the semester.

1.00
THTR 111 THTR 111 - Stagecraft I

This course is an introduction to the basics of
stage construction, costume construction, theatre
technology, terminology, and common theatre
practices

2.00
THTR 112 THTR 112 - Stagecraft II

This course is an introduction to the basics of
stage lighting, sound, theatre technology,
terminology, and common theatre practices

2.00
THTR 130 THTR 130 - Introduction to Theatre

This course is designed to spark (or increase) students’ enthusiasm for the theatre arts, helping them to understand the roles of the many artists and practitioners involved in the creation of theatre. Students will gain an appreciation for dramatic literature and for the process required to move a play from the page to the stage, and will investigate the varied origins and boundaries of the art form. The class will take every opportunity to involve students in practical exploration of theatre-making. Attendance at theatre performances is required.

3.00
THTR 151 THTR 151 - Mainstage

Students must participate fully as an actor or stage manager in the semester's Mainstage production.

1.00
THTR 152 THTR 152 - Mainstage

Students must participate fully as an actor or stage manager in the semester's Mainstage production.

1.00
THTR 153 THTR 153 - Ensemble

Students must participate fully as actors or stage managers in the semester’s Mainstage/ Ensemble production.

1.00
THTR 161 THTR 161 - Acting I: Foundations of Acting

An introductory course orienting students toward open and aggressive participation in performance. Utilizing theatre games, relaxation techniques, experiential exercises and improvisation, students build sensory knowledge of the human experience and create/interpret scripted scenes through imaginative inquiry into given circumstances, character, relationship, objectives, and actions. The insight and understanding students gain through building sensory knowledge of their own feelings, voices, and bodies and then translating that knowledge while constructing the experience of another human being builds an appreciation and empathy for the meaning and values of other people.

3.00
THTR 162 THTR 162 - Acting I: The Actor's Process

Introduction to scene study and character development. Students learn the building blocks of effective acting by applying foundational acting theory to improvisation, scenes, and monologues. Students are expected to offer thoughtful critique of others’ work, a vital part of the learning process.

3.00
THTR 175 THTR 175 - Voice and Movement I

The emphasis in this course is freeing the voice and body to communicate effectively. Students are encouraged to discover their own gifts and abilities, to become comfortable with their voice and body, and to establish a foundation for future growth and development. Both voice and movement work are based on discovering proper alignment and a neutral position from which to explore. Voice work is designed to teach proper vocal warm-up; voice care and support; and elements of resonance, articulation, and projection. Physical movement exercises include activities designed to increase body awareness, flexibility, emotional connection, and expressiveness. All voice and body work emphasizes the integration of the actor’s instrument, the individuality of each person, and the necessity for authentic embodied communication. Discoveries will be applied to acting work in class and on stage, and to everyday life, as self-presentation affects both public perception and self-image.

3.00
THTR 180 THTR 180 - Integration Forum

A seminar for students in all levels of the program, this course is required for all BA in theatre and BFA in acting majors, as well as students involved in productions. The class incorporates analysis and critique of productions viewed, as well as discussion of topical issues in theatre. Particular attention is given to integration of faith and art and preparation for a life in the theatre

0.00
THTR 261 THTR 261 - Acting II: Scene Study

Students apply principles learned in THTR 161 and THTR 162 to the preparation and presentation of scenes from contemporary plays. Script analysis, character development, subtext, action, and objective are explored through personalized coaching.

3.00
THTR 262 THTR 262 - Acting II: Advanced Scene Study

A continuation of THTR 261, students work to access and express the emotional lives of characters through natural, truthful behaviour.

3.00
THTR 275 THTR 275 - Voice and Movement II

A continuation of the work begun in THTR 175, this course encourages students to further develop their physical and vocal instruments, seeking deeper exploration and more creative expression.

3.00
THTR 290 THTR 290 - Introductory Special Topics in Theatre

Topics vary from year to year.

3.00
THTR 301 THTR 301 - Production

Students must fulfil assigned technical crew responsibilities during the semester.

1.00
THTR 302 THTR 302 - Production

Students must fulfil assigned technical crew responsibilities during the semester.

1.00
THTR 314 THTR 314 - Stage Lighting

The study of lighting theory and practice for the
stage: fundamentals of light, basics of electricity,
lighting equipment and its use, historical overview
of lighting for theatre productions, examination of
current lighting methodology, introduction to
lighting design. This course is two hours of lecture
and four hours of lab each week.

3.00
THTR 315 THTR 315 - Theatrical Design

An introduction to the principles of design and
their application for the theatre. Includes: (1) play
analysis focusing on visual and spatial design
requirements; (2) research into period styles as
well as practise in adapting and recreating styles
for the stage; and; (3) drawing, mechanical
drafting, painting, and model making. Attendance
at outside performances may be required.

3.00
THTR 321 THTR 321 - Directing

A study of the art and practice of directing, this course begins with an understanding of the director’s role and an appreciation for the traits of successful directors. Students read basic directing theory, analyze play scripts, direct scenes, and critique the work of other directors. Activities are designed to develop students’ communication and conceptualization skills, aesthetic sense, and critical faculties. Students have opportunity to observe directors at work and to attend guest lectures by professional directors.

3.00
THTR 325 THTR 325 - Playwriting

A course in the art of structuring action and dialogue for the stage. Students study dramatic theory, and workshop an original one-act play to be submitted by the end of term. Plays from the class may be selected for staged readings.

3.00
THTR 331 THTR 331 - Theatre History I: Origins to 1660

Theatre History I instils in students the knowledge that to understand the present and prepare for the future, they must first come to terms with the past by engaging in methodical research of archival documents and artifacts from the early years of European and Asian Theatre. In training students to grasp the intimate relation between past events, present circumstances, and future possibilities, this mode of inquiry equips them to apply that past to theatre practice and to become engaged, socially responsible citizens. It also teaches students that all accounts of past events are shaped by the interpretive practices of the historian, enabling them to detect and interrogate the ideological dimension of historiography.

3.00
THTR 332 THTR 332 - Theatre History II: 1660 to Present

Theatre History II instils in students the knowledge that to understand the present and prepare for the future, they must first come to terms with the past by engaging in methodical research of archival documents and artifacts of the modern and contemporary eras. In training students to grasp the intimate relation between past events, present circumstances, and future possibilities, this mode of inquiry equips them to apply that past to theatre practice and to become engaged, socially responsible citizens. It also teaches students that all accounts of past events are shaped by the interpretive practices of the historian, enabling them to detect and interrogate the ideological dimension of historiography.

3.00
THTR 341 THTR 341 - Shakespeare I

An intensive study of selected works by William Shakespeare situated in their Elizabethan and Jacobean contexts. Works studied may include the sonnets, the history plays, Henry IV and Henry V; the comedies, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and As You Like It; the problem play, Measure for Measure; and the tragedies, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, and Macbeth.

3.00
THTR 342 THTR 342 - Shakespeare II

An intensive study of selected works by William Shakespeare situated in their Elizabethan and Jacobean contexts. Works studied may include Venus and Adonis, the history play, Richard III; the comedy, The Merchant of Venice; the tragedies Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, and Antony and Cleopatra; and the romances, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest.

3.00
THTR 343 THTR 343 - Canadian Drama

A survey of Canadian plays. Students engage in detailed analyses of dramatic texts: their structures, historical/cultural contexts and production histories. In addition to readings, papers, presentations, and in-class discussions, students are required to attend and report on a current production of a Canadian play (provided such a production occurs during the semester).

3.00
THTR 344 THTR 344 - Modern Drama

A study of eight to 10 modern plays - British, American, and Canadian - representing different forms and approaches to drama in the last 100 years.

3.00
THTR 345 THTR 345 - Irish Drama

A survey of the dramatic literature of Ireland, focusing on twentieth century plays from Yeats to Beckett and Friel. After a quick review of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the course turns to the drama of Irish nationalism and follows its development into the international arena.

3.00
THTR 346 THTR 346 - American Drama

A survey of significant American dramatic literature. Beginning with a brief background of eighteenth and nineteenth century drama influenced by European styles, the course progresses to Eugene O’Neill, widely considered to be the dramatist to define a distinct American voice in the theatre. This course then examines the work of significant playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Tennessee Williams, Tony Kushner, Lorraine Hansberry and others, and includes a component on “the book musical”.

3.00
THTR 347 THTR 347 - Drama of Japan

A survey of classical Japanese drama in English translation. The Noh drama of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries and the Bunraku and Kabuki drama of the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. An examination of the impact of these forms on film theory in the twentieth century.

3.00
THTR 348 THTR 348 - World Drama

“World Drama is a survey course of the dramatic literature of the past 2500 years, from classic nationalist drama to the global contemporary drama of the twenty-first century. Students will explore social and global issues such as war, class struggle, gender inequality, dysfunctional family life, and more, from past times and today, in the context of the drama of different world cultures.” World Drama is a course of reading, discussion, and audience response to live performances of global drama from differing cultures and times (in English translation). The course will entail both the reading of major plays and attendance of live performances of world dramatic masterpieces that are available at theatres in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. Though designed for Theatre and English students, the course is of great value to any student who wishes a broader knowledge of world culture through its varied theatrical expressions. Play choices are made to avoid overlap with other dramatic literature currently taught in both the Theatre and English departments, where advisable.

3.00
THTR 352 THTR 352 - Mainstage

Students must participate fully as an actor or stage manager in the semester's Mainstage production.

1.00
THTR 354 THTR 354 - Ensemble

Students must participate fully as actors or stage managers in the semester’s Mainstage/ Ensemble production.

1.00
THTR 361 THTR 361 - Acting III: Styles of Acting

An advanced scene-study class exploring acting styles of various historical periods with a view towards presentation to contemporary audiences.

3.00
THTR 362 THTR 362 - Acting III: Shakespeare

An advanced scene-study class exploring Shakespeare in performance. Students are expected to carefully analyze assigned Shakespearean texts as part of their preparation.

3.00
THTR 375 THTR 375 - Voice and Movement III

Building on previous voice and movement courses, this course encourages students to further develop their physical and vocal instruments, seeking deeper exploration and more creative expression.

3.00
THTR 383 THTR 383 - Drama for Church Ministry

A study of the broad range of issues involved in leading a church drama ministry. The course focuses on writing and directing, and provides an overview of the various facets of production relevant to mounting dramatic works of various types in a church setting. Issues relating to staffing and leadership are also covered.

3.00
THTR 390 THTR 390 - Special Topics in Theatre

Topics vary from year to year.

3.00
THTR 391 THTR 391 - Developmental Drama

This course examines various modes of children’s theatre: puppetry, mask, reader’s theatre, storytelling, and plays that have been written for children and participators. This course is recommended for future educators.

3.00
THTR 392 THTR 392 - Theatre with Children

An introduction to the use of drama in the classroom and for educational purposes. This course is recommended for future educators.

3.00
THTR 441 THTR 441 - Drama to 1642

A study of English drama from its liturgical origins to the closing of the theatres in 1642, including medieval mystery cycles and morality plays, as well as works by Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline playwrights.

3.00
THTR 442 THTR 442 - 18th Century Drama

A survey of the English drama of the eighteenth century. An examination of representative works of the London stage and comparative continental dramas, in transition and in cultural context.

3.00
THTR 461 THTR 461 - Acting IV: Auditioning

An overview and exploration of the skills and resources needed to successfully audition for live theatre or graduate school. Students prepare monologues and songs, develop an acting resume, and improve improvisation and cold reading skills relevant to auditions.

3.00
THTR 462 THTR 462 - Acting IV: From Stage to Screen

Open to advanced acting students, this course requires an ability to understand and apply acting theory, a thorough knowledge of the language of the actor, and an ability to express oneself physically and vocally. Under the mentorship of a professional stage and screen actor, students learn to adapt their training to work for the camera. Scene work is performed on camera, increasing students’ comfort level and providing a solid grounding in the technical considerations and language of the medium. Auditioning for film is also covered.

3.00
THTR 475 THTR 475 - Voice and Movement IV

This course encourages students to further develop their physical and vocal instruments, seeking deeper exploration and more creative expression.

3.00
THTR 480 THTR 480 - Senior Seminar: Christianity and Theatre

A retrospective of the 2000-year relationship between the Christian church and the theatre as institutions. The concepts of “the wicked stage,” the stage as a “moral institution,” “Proteanism,” and the paradox of both public fascination with actors and the distrust of them. An exploration of these topics by theoreticians such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Beltrame, Rousseau, Voltaire, Artaud, and Grotowski. A major paper on the integration of faith and theatre art is required.

3.00
THTR 498 THTR 498 - Professional Orientation

This course is designed to prepare the graduating BFA student for a career in the theatre. Topics include: resume and headshot preparation, financial management, interview skills, introduction to professional theatres, networking opportunities, self-production, creating a demo reel, getting an agent, establishing community, discipline and perseverance, and understanding Equity.

3.00
THTR 499 THTR 499 - Professional Internship

A supervised practicum enabling a student to work in the professional theatre. Students must spend a minimum of 100 hours in supervised work with an approved theatre company.

3.00