Code Course Credits
ENGL 530 ENGL 530 - Medieval Literature

Focuses on the rich and varied visionary and mystical literature of the early, high and late Middle Ages, including the writings of Bernard of Clairvaux, Richard of St. Victor, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Richard Rolle, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing, and Meister Eckhart. The influence of early theologians and philosophers (such as Origen, Plotinus, and Augustine) on these mystics is considered in detail, as is the influence of the medieval mystics on mystical thinkers of Renaissance Europe (including Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross). This course also seeks to read the ontological and epistemological elements of medieval mysticism through the filter of modern philosophical paradigms.

3.00
ENGL 551 ENGL 551 - Shakespeare I

Students study seven plays by William Shakespeare (representative histories, tragedies, comedies, and romances) in addition to his narrative poem Venus and Adonis. Shakespeare's plays are considered as both established literary works and as scripts written for performance, and students apply different critical approaches to his works in an attempt to discover the source and nature of the plays' aesthetic power and dramatic force. The course attempts to determine whether William Shakespeare is, as some have claimed, the greatest and most influential writer of all time.

3.00
ENGL 572 ENGL 572 - Romantic Poetry & Poetics

A study of the poetry created by the six major poets grouped under the term Romantic: William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron (George Gordon), Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats. The course considers both the poetry and critical theories of these influential authors. Graduate students concentrate on the poetry and criticism of one particular poet.

3.00
ENGL 583 ENGL 583 - World Literature in English

This course focuses on issues related to post-colonialism and literature through the study of literature written in English by writers from post-colonial nations.

3.00
ENGL 590 ENGL 590 - Individual Authors

Designed to give students the opportunity of studying for an entire semester the works of up to two significant authors.

3.00
ENGL 593 ENGL 593 - Fantasy Literature

Examines the long history of fantasy texts by first locating works of George MacDonald, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L'Engle within the Anglo-Saxon epic and the Medieval romance literary traditions in English literature, including Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The course also considers how these works have shaped the imagination of creators of modern fantasy as well as the argument that modern fantasy is a response to post-Enlightenment rationalism.

3.00
ENGL 600 ENGL 600 - Reading theTimes:Text&Interpretat'n

Designed to orient students to the crucial transition from modernist to postmodernist and post-postmodernist models of texts and interpretation, models that depend on changing philosophical views of truth and reality. Examines the main interpretive paradigms in literary studies in order to show how views of reason, language, and textuality continue to shape one's life horizons.

3.00
ENGL 607 ENGL 607 - Special Topics

Topics may vary. Courses to date include:Foundations of Ethical BeingJames Baldwin: The Dialectic of Race and ReligionKierkegaard's PostscriptLife Writing as a Literary Genre: Biography as Identification of Self and SubjectivityThe Poetics of Resistance, Affirmation and Immigrant Voices and the Poetry of TraumaStudies in George MacDonaldGerman RomanticismGothic FictionPoetics of American LiteratureMerton and the Solitary Tradition18th Century NovelIdentity and Ethics in CommunicationMilton and the RomanticsShakespearean Trauma and the Early-Modern Suffering SelfStudies in the Late-Victorian Fiction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

3.00
ENGL 610 ENGL 610 - Research Design/Bibliography

Under the direction of the student's approved thesis or major research paper advisor, a course of reading and study which leads to the development of both a significant bibliographical essay (or annotated bibliography) and a thesis proposal. The latter includes at least the following: major question(s) to be addressed; significance of the issue(s); methodologies to be used; theories to be addressed and primary sources to be examined.

3.00
ENGL 611 ENGL 611 - Thesis 3.00
ENGL 612 ENGL 612 - Thesis

Under the direction of a supervisor, students not writing a thesis will research and write a major paper of approximately 10,000'15,000 words in length.

3.00
ENGL 613 ENGL 613 - Major Essay 3.00
ENGL 640 ENGL 640 - Science Fiction: 1600-1900

This course will provide an intensive study of significant works of 'science fiction' written between 1600 and 1900 from a literary historical perspective.

3.00
GREE 532 GREE 532 - Readings in the Greek New Testament 3.00
HIST 506 HIST 506 - War, Peace and Society

Surveys the changing nature of and approaches to war and its effect on society from the Middle Ages to the present including an examination of various visions and proposals for peace. Includes an assessment of relatively recent armed conflict in Africa, Central Europe, and the Middle East, exploring the causes of contemporary conflict and some of its distinctive characteristics. Also evaluates the effectiveness of various strategies for preventing, abating, and terminating current forms of conflict. Some of the questions discussed are: Why do states go to war? How do they create a lasting peace? What role does morality play in foreign policy? What is our obligation to just peace or just war?

3.00
HIST 522 HIST 522 - History of the Family after 1600

Examines the historical development of the family beginning with the ancient world up to 1600. A central inquiry is the formation of families and households, as well the impact of religion on gender and family roles. The course also explores the use of power and coercion in the organization of family and includes an inquiry into contemporary gender theory but concentrates on the lives and ideas of actual persons insofar as the historical record reveals them.

3.00
HIST 523 HIST 523 - Tudor-Stuart England

This course is designed to survey a historical period in greater depth while introducing students to related primary and secondary sources. Students are familiarized with major themes, events, and issues of interpretation in the history of early modern England. Particular attention is paid to two developments that transformed English life: the religious reformations of the 16th century, and the civil war and political revolutions of the 17th century. These and other topics are explored through close readings of primary sources. Students also consider various methodological and theoretical approaches that have influenced the way that modern historians have analyzed and explained this period in English history.

3.00
HIST 524 HIST 524 - Nineteenth Century Europe

This course examines the long 19th century from the French Revolution to the onset of the Great War. Explores key movements and themes in political, intellectual, and socio-economic history through lectures, discussion groups, and close readings of primary and secondary sources.NB: Not offered every year. See Department chair.(3-0 or 3-0)

3.00
HIST 533 HIST 533 - Development of Cdn Constitution

A historical and political analysis of the major steps leading to the present constitution, including landmark court cases, attempted and successful amendments (Constitution Act 1981, the Meech Lake Accord, the Charlottetown Accord, etc) and various historical Acts both prior to and post-Confederation.

3.00
HIST 562 HIST 562 - History of Christianity II 3.00
HIST 592 HIST 592 - Sugar,Slaves,Silver: Atlantic World 3.00
HIST 600 HIST 600 - History, Culture and Interpretation

Designed to explore history as a discipline and a form of knowledge. It examines the process and the structure of how human societies have interpreted, ordered and used historical inquiry. Major theoretical/philosophical traditions and their historians are analyzed. Special attention is paid to modern rational history with its focus on the notion of progress and the challenges brought about by the claims of postmodern interpretation-based history with its emphasis on language, race, ethnicity, gender, and environment. Furthermore, it explores history's impact on other disciplines including philosophy, literary criticism, biology, physics, and religious studies. Combines weekly readings with selected guest lectures that explore the ways in which history is understood in History and in other disciplines.

3.00
HIST 607 HIST 607 - Special Topics in History

Topics may vary. Courses offered to date include:De-colonizing Gender in African HistoryFirst Nations-Canadians in B.C.History of Arian TheologyHistory of the Celtic ChurchHistory of the Metis in CanadaIntroduction to Patristics StudyMedieval WarfareArian TheologySacred Women in the Ancient WorldWar, Peace, and International LawGender and the CharterTransatlantic British EmpireChristian Perspective on Israel

3.00
HIST 610 HIST 610 - Research Design/Bibliography

Under the direction of the student's approved thesis advisor, a course of reading and study which leads to the development of both a significant bibliographical essay (or annotated bibliography) and a thesis proposal. The latter includes at least the following: major question(s) to be addressed; significance of the issue(s); methodologies to be used; theories to be addressed and primary sources to be examined.

3.00
HIST 611 HIST 611 - Thesis 3.00
HIST 612 HIST 612 - Thesis 3.00
HIST 613 HIST 613 - Major Essay

Under the direction of a supervisor, students who do not do a thesis research and write a major paper of approximately 10,000'15,000 words in length.

3.00
PHIL 511 PHIL 511 - Kant

A study of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, focusing primarily on Kant's seminal work, Critique of Pure Reason.

3.00
PHIL 513 PHIL 513 - Empiricism 3.00
PHIL 520 PHIL 520 - Social&Political Philosophy

Provides an examination of foundational ideas and problems in the entire Western tradition of political philosophy. While undertaking close readings of major texts of this tradition, the course evaluates classical, medieval, and modern approaches to the state, the citizen, democracy, liberty, equality, authority, obligation, natural right, and disobedience. Also seeks to understand the applicability of these ideas as Christians facing the challenges of the 21st century.

3.00
PHIL 550 PHIL 550 - Symbolic Logic

This course acquaints students with the elements of symbolic logic and its methods of deduction, including: the quantificational calculus, definite descriptions, identity, and the logic of relations. The significance of symbolic logic is examined in relation to logical atomism as advanced early in the 20th century by Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell.

3.00
PHIL 570 PHIL 570 - Epistemology

A descriptive and critical inquiry into the theory of knowledge, including such topics as foundationalism, relativism, evidence, warrant, cognitive reliability, skepticism, and the relationship of cognitive science and psychology to philosophical accounts of knowledge and rational inquiry.

3.00
PHIL 584 PHIL 584 - Suffering and Belief in God

Examines some key issues pertaining to suffering and belief in God. Topics include the problem of evil, arguments from suffering original sin, everlasting suffering, and providence.

3.00
PHIL 590 PHIL 590 - Philosophy of Mind

Deals with questions such as: What are we referring to when we speak of mind? What is the nature of the human mind? Does it have a nature? Does it exist as something separate from the human brain? Is it a property of the human brain? Is it identical to the human brain? Or is it merely an abbreviated way of talking about bodily behaviours? More particularly, how is our phenomenologically rich and existentially weighted point of view on the world related to the neurophysiological conditions that underwrite it (or as one writer put it, 'how is the water of the brain transubstantiated into the wine of consciousness?')? How does the way we understand the answers to these questions inform Christian belief that humans bear God's image? And how does theology bear on our understanding of our bodies' relationship to our minds?

3.00
PHIL 600 PHIL 600 - Core Issues in Philosophy

Examines some of the most influential views of human nature advanced by philosophers and scientists in the history of Western civilization, and to explore implications of these views for ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Plato and Aristotle are considered to have been seminal in shaping western views of human nature, and Christianity has drawn from ancient Greeks in articulating its own views. This backdrop to the modern period in philosophy is first examined before moving into seminal views advanced in modernity and postmodernity. Among the latter will be both philosophical views and scientific views on human nature, views held by Rationalists, Kantians, Empiricists, Darwinians, Behaviorists, Existentialists, Marxists, Freudians, Pragmatists, Evolutionary Psychologists, Post-structuralists, and Transhumanists.

3.00
PHIL 607 PHIL 607 - Topics in Philosophy

Topics may vary. Courses offered to date:Existence, Truth, and PossibilityMedieval CosmologyEmpericismNeoplatonism and Early ChristianityFoundations of Ethics

3.00
PHIL 610 PHIL 610 - Research Design

Under the direction of the student's approved thesis advisor, a course of reading and study which leads to the development of both a significant bibliographical essay (or annotated bibliography) and a thesis proposal. The latter includes at least the following: major question(s) to be addressed; significance of the issue(s); methodologies to be used; theories to be addressed and primary sources to be examined.

3.00
PHIL 611 PHIL 611 - Thesis 3.00
PHIL 612 PHIL 612 - Thesis 3.00
PHIL 613 PHIL 613 - Major Essay

Under the direction of a supervisor, students not doing a thesis research and write a major paper of approximately 10-15,000 words in length.

3.00

New courses to be added in Fall 2020.

CODE COURSE CREDITS STREAM
RELS 5XX (361) History of Christianity I 3 CT
RELS 5XX (362) History of Christianity II 3 CT
RELS 5XX (465) Influential Thinkers in the Christian Tradition 3 CT
RELS 5XX (466) The Church Fathers 3 CT
RELS 5XX (467) The Theology of Karl Barth 3 CT
RELS 5XX (475) Christianity and Culture 3 CT
RELS 5XX (476) Christian Worldviews in Historical and Cultural Context 3 CT
RELS 5XX (477) New Testament Canon: Development and Theology 3 NT, CT
RELS 5XX (381) Contemporary Christianity 3 CT
RELS 6XX History of Christian Doctrine 3 CT
RELS 6XX Early & Mediaveal Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Reformation Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Modern Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Method in Theology 3 NT, CT
RELS 6XX Theologies of Liberation 3 CT
RELS 6XX Special Topics in Christian Thought 3 CT
RELS 6XX Major Paper 5 OT, NT, CT, BRL, BB