Scholars working within this hub will advance Nursing Education focusing on topics related to teaching and learning the discipline of nursing. This may include topics such as curricular development and review, developing new pedagogical approaches, implementing innovative clinical sites, or evaluating learning outcomes (curriculum evaluation).

RESEARCH PROJECTS

SOCIAL MEDIA LITERACY: FACILITATING USE AND CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF ELECTRONIC HEALTH INFORMATION

Principal Investigator: Maggie Theron (TWU)

Co- Investigator:  Barb Astle (TWU), Duncan Dixon (Librarian TWU) Anne Redmond (TWU).

Ongoing Research: This research seeks to address student learning in the area of health informatics literacy.  Through a collaborative approach, we developed and are piloting an appraisal tool to increase baccalaureate nursing students’ competency to critically examining social media information.

BACCALAUREATE NURSING STUDENTS’ USE AND APPRAISAL ABILITIES OF ONLINE HEALTH INFORMATION         

Principal Investigator: Maggie Theron (TWU)

Co- Investigator:  Anne Redmond (TWU), Elizabeth M. Borycki (U Vic).

Completed Project: The purpose of this research was to ascertain nursing students’ ability to critically identify and evaluate the quality of social media health information. Using a developed Digital Health Assignment, students engage in learning strategies to improve their electronic information health literacy and competency.  

RESEARCH LITERACY      

Co-authors:  Sonya L. Jakubec (Mount Royal University) & Barbara J. Astle (Trinity Western University).

Textbook: “Research Literacy for Health and Community Practice”, Canadian Scholars.

Date of Project: 2013 – Present

Available: August 2017

Purpose: This textbook introduces students to fundamental research concepts that will enable them to think critically about research and to recognize effective methods for understanding and utilizing research practice.

TRANSITIONING FROM STUDENT TO RN – NURSES HELPING NURSES     

Principal Investigator: Landa Terblanche, PhD, RN (TWU)

Ongoing Research: The purpose of the research is to explore the systems psychodynamic experiences of newly qualified registered nurses regarding their normative, existential and phenomenal roles while crossing the boundary from being a student nurse to being a registered nurse. It is believed that this boundary crossing represents a transition in their careers which is filled with free floating and performance anxiety.  The researcher hopes to gain information regarding newly RN's role transition, the nature and level of anxiety, its introjections, projections and systems psychodynamic scripts. It is hoped that the data could assist BSN program in developing more empathy towards this role transition and to assist during the program to mentor students more optimally.

THE ROLE OF SPIRITUALITY IN COPING WITH THE DEMANDS OF THE HOSPITAL CULTURE AMONGST NURSING STUDENTS

Principal Investigators: Frans Cilliers. D.Phil. Department of Industrial & Organisational Psychology, UNISA, South Africa; Landa Terblanche. PhD. RN School of Nursing, Trinity Western University, Canada.

Completed Research: The purpose of this research was to describe the role of spirituality in coping with the demands of the hospital culture amongst fourth year nursing students. Qualitative, descriptive, hermeneutic interpretive research was done. Fourteen female Canadian nursing students were asked to write an essay on their experiences of the demands of the hospital culture. Content analysis was used and positive psychology served as the interpretive lens. The findings indicated that although the nursing students expressed themselves in religious and spiritual words, they did not significantly illustrate the theoretically required intra-, interpersonal and sacred behaviours to be referred to as being spiritual in their experience as a care giver in the hospital culture. They also did not illustrate behaviours linked to other positive psychology constructs such as sense of coherence, resilience, engagement or emotional intelligence. Rather, the nursing students experienced identity crises. Recommendations for the inclusion of mentoring in the curriculum of nursing students were formulated.

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE: EXPLORING GLOBAL HEALTH COMPETENCIES FOR UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS          

Principal Investigator: Barbara.Astle (TWU)

Co- Investigators:  Sheryl Reimer Kirkham (TWU); Anne Redmond (TWU)

Date of Project: 2013 – Present

Funding: TWU Internal Grant

Ongoing Research: The purpose of this study was to examine how core global health competencies for nursing students could facilitate the development of global citizenship.

Upcoming Presentations (Accepted):

Astle, B., Reimer-Kirkham, S., & Redman, A. (May 30, 2017). Global Health Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Perspectives on Global Health Competencies. Barcelona ICN Congress 2017, Barcelona, Spain.

Astle, B., Reimer-Kirkham, S., & Redman, A. (July 11 – 14, 2017). Global Health Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Students: Preparing for the Future. Xi Eta and Region 1 – 2017 International Nursing Research and Leadership Conference. Vancouver, BC. Canada.

NURSING STUDENTS PARTNERING: A ZAMBIAN-CANADIAN CASE STUDY

Principal Investigators: Barb Astle (TWU, Canada) & Sheryl Reimer Kirkham (TWU, Canada)

Co-Investigators: Darlane Pankratz (Canada):  Collaborator: Ms. Clare Kasapo Ntinde (Zambia)

Date of Project:  2013 - present

Funding: Western Northern Region Canadian Association Schools of Nursing

Ongoing Research: The purpose of this case study is to explore partnering between Zambian and Canadian nursing students in the context of an international learning experience.

Presentations:

Astle, B., Reimer-Kirkham, S., Pankratz, D., & Kasapo Ntinde, C. (February 19, 2015). Implications for Nursing Education with International Placements. Western Northern Regions Canadian Association for Schools of Nursing (WNRCASN) Conference, College of the Rockies, Cranbrook, BC, Canada.

Astle, B., Pankratz, D., & Reimer-Kirkham, S. (February, 2014)). Nursing students partnering: A Zambian-Canadian Study – Challenges in conducting global research. Western and Northern Region Canadian Association Schools of Nursing (WNRCASN) Conference, Winnipeg, MN, Canada.

DEVELOPMENT OF A FRAMEWORK FOR INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON PALLIATIVE CARE RESEARCH AND A GRADUATE COURSE

Principal Investigators: Joakim Öhlén (Ersta Skondal University College, Sweden) & Richard Sawatzky, [Trinity Western University (TWU), Canada]

Co-Investigators: Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (TWU) Canada; Barbara Astle (TWU) Canada; Cecilia Håkanson (Sweden); Joyce Lee (TWU) Canada; Marjukka Eriksson (Sweden)

Date of Project:  2015 - 2016

Funding: Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education Grant.

Completed Research: The specific aim was to develop a framework for international collaboration on palliative care research and graduate education within pluralistic societies, which would integrate person-centred perspectives with standardization and measurement.

Publication:

Öhlén, J., Reimer-Kirkham, S., Astle, B., Håkanson, C., Lee, J., Eriksson, M., & Sawatzky, R. (Accepted, 2017). Person-centred care dialectics-Inquired in the context of palliative care. Nursing Philosophy.

A MULTI-PHASE RESEARCH PROGRAM INVESTIGATING VARIOUS ASPECTS OF THE USE OF INNOVATIVE CLINICAL PLACEMENTS IN BACCALAUREATE NURSING EDUCATION

Principal Investigator: Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham

Co-Investigators:  Rick Sawatzky, Catherine Hoe Harwood, Landa Terblanche, Lynn Van Hofwegen

Since 2002 the Innovative Clinical Placements (ICP) Research team at TWU School of Nursing has examined multiple dimensions regarding Nursing Student learning and Nurse Educator perspectives regarding the use of Innovative Clinical Placements in Nursing Education.

PHASE 1: INNOVATIVE CLINICAL PLACEMENTS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY (2002 - 2005).

Funded by Western Regions Canadian Association Schools of Nursing Research Award.

This study examined student learning opportunities for population-focused nursing care in several innovative clinical sites used by one university nursing program: parish, rural, corrections, Aboriginal, and international health settings. Findings from this study demonstrate that although these placements may require more administrative time, rich student learning occurs. Students in these placements report a heightened awareness of patients' lived reality of health and illness and the social contexts that shaped these patient experiences. Findings also highlight catalysts and challenges of using innovative clinical settings and perspectives on how to maximize learning in these settings.

Publications:

Reimer Kirkham, S., Van Hofwegen, L., & Hoe Harwood, C. (2005). Narratives of Social Justice: Student Learning in Innovative Clinical Placements. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship. 2(1), article 28. Available: http://www.bepress.com/ijnes/vol2/iss1/art28

Van Hofwegen, L., Reimer Kirkham, S., & Hoe Harwood, C. (2005). Accessing the strength of rural health settings: Implications for undergraduate nursing education. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship. 2(1), article 27. Available: http://www.bepress.com/ijnes/vol2/iss1/art27

Reimer Kirkham, S., Hoe Harwood, C., & Van Hofwegen, L. (2005). Capturing the vision: Undergraduate nursing students in innovative clinical settings. Nurse Educator, 30(6):263-270.

A PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT

Keeping the Vision: Sustaining Social Consciousness with Nursing Students following International Learning Experiences (Funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Aid to Small Universities, $3000). Co Principal Investigators: S. Reimer Kirkham; L. Van Hofwegen; Co-Investigator: D. Pankratz

Reimer Kirkham, S.,Van Hofwegen, L., & Pankratz, D. (2009). “Keeping the vision”: Sustaining social consciousness following international learning experiences. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship. 6(1), article 3.

USE OF INNOVATIVE CLINICAL PLACEMENTS IN UNDERGRADUATE NURSING EDUCATION: A NATIONAL SURVEY 

Phase II: 2005 - 2009

Health professional education programs are responding to the community and population-based foci of healthcare by seeking to integrate strong community components in their curricula. At the same time, recent healthcare restructuring and cuts to community health programs, along with increased enrolments, have made the allocation of clinical placements for health professions students extremely challenging. Yet, clinical learning experiences continue as the backbone of health professional education where students bring theory and practice together (i.e., praxis) in a transition to professional practice. In the search for suitable clinical placements needed to fulfill mandated number of clinical hours, educators are turning to various non-traditional settings in a shift that is both philosophically and practically motivated.

This ambitious survey project examined the utilization of innovative clinical placements in undergraduate nursing programs from the perspectives of clinical placement coordinators and nurse educators. A national survey was used to collect data from 74 Canadian nursing programs in the Winter of 2005/2006. The data from the survey were validated and expanded upon during a focus group with nurse educators and administrators in November 2006. A detailed discussion of the background, methods, and results of the study is provided in the report.

Phase II publication:

Hoe Harwood, C., Reimer-Kirkham, S., Sawatzky R. , Terblanche, L., Van Hofwegen, L. (2009) Innovation in Community Clinical Placements: A Canadian Survey International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 6 (1) Article 28,
DOI: 10.2202/1548-923X.1860

COMMUNITY AGENCY HOST PERSPECTIVES WHEN PROVIDING ICP COMMUNITY CLINICAL PLACEMENTS FOR NURSING STUDENT EDUCATION.

Phase III: 2011 – 2014

What are the driving factors for community based agency settings outside of traditional government administered care settings to host nursing student placement? Why do even well established and mutually reported successful settings decline to host subsequent nursing student community clinical placements?

The focus of Phase III research is to elicit the experience of Host agency personnel who have hosted ICP placements for nursing students and describe factors that promote and hinder future clinical placements in their settings.

Phase III publication:

Reimer-Kirkham, S., Terblanche, L., Sawatzky, R., Hoe Eriksen, C. (2016). Host agency perspectives on facilitating community-based clinical experiences for nursing students.  Quality Advancement in Nursing Education - Avancées en formation infirmière 2(1), Article 3.