Geraldine Finn

TITLE:

GIVNG PLACE – MAKING SPACE – FOR TRUTH – IN MUSIC

ABSTRACT:

Art is Truth Setting itself to Work (Heidegger) This paper has been composed as an explicitly oral presentation to at once exemplify and explore our experience of sense and/as sound, sound and/as sense (of truth) in music – in writing, in speech. Written by ear to be (read as) heard. Taking inspiration from Heidegger’s The Origin of the Work of Art, Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of perception and expression as parole originaire, and Derrida’s elaboration of the play of différance, and putting traditional musicology out of play, the presentation takes the sound of music – not its organization but its sound – as its point of departure for (re)thinking the relationship between sense and sound, music and words, between epistemology, ethics, kinaesthetics and aesthetics in/as/for a music(ologie) originaire. A music(ologie) articulated from the other side of language, that is, the hither side of speech, in/from the space between the instituted categories of sedimented thought. Ce qui reste à force de musique. The undetermined and indeterminable space between what appears to be and not to be the case: between mind and body, self and other, subject and object, presence and absence, inside and outside, the intelligible and the sensible, sense and non-sense, silence and speech, necessity and chance/choice: between what is and what is (not) to be (real, music, truth, for example). Which is the ethical space. The space of a response-ability that cannot not be assumed. The space of becoming. Of poethics. Of kinaesthetics. Of a music(ologie) to come. Of the future. À-venir. Music(ologie) originaire.

BIO:

Geraldine Finn has a B.A. in English and Philosophy from Keele University (England,1969), an M.A. in Philosophy from McMaster University (Canada, 1971), and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Ottawa (Canada, 1981). She is Professor of Cultural Studies and Philosophy in the School for Studies in Art and Culture, and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. Her area of expertise is twentieth century Continental Philosophy and its relevance to contemporary interdisciplinary studies in culture and the arts. She has published widely on a variety of issues at the intersection of philosophy, feminism, music(ology) and cultural studies and is currently working on two book-length studies: There is No Ethics in the Language of Genes , and The Truth in Music .