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Year Course ID Course
2021-2022 PHIL 103

Introduction to Logic

An analysis of the use of reasoning in ordinary language. Students are introduced to deductive logic by learning how to recognize arguments by identifying some common fallacies and by learning several methods of assessing the quality of arguments. Both traditional and modern methods of determining deductive validity, including a formal theory of inference, are studied.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None
2021-2022 PHIL 105

Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the major questions about existence and what it is to be human while providing some of the foundational philosophical responses to these questions. Topics to be discussed include: the relation between perception and knowledge (appearance and reality); the existence and nature of God; human freedom and determinism; the meaning of human existence; the nature of moral judgments; the mind-body problem; artificial intelligence; feminist philosophy; the problem of suffering; and whether humans are capable of selfless motivation. Students will be encouraged to interpret and reflect upon the meaning of the relation between reason and faith as the joint foundation for addressing these questions in a logical and ethical manner.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 PHIL 106

Introduction to Philosophy II

An historical overview of the western philosophical tradition from Socrates to the present day. Considerable discussion will be devoted to the distinct approaches of ancient, medieval, and modern thinkers to the relation between reason and faith. Additionally, there will be extensive attention devoted to the history of logical and ethical reasoning as we evaluate the impact of these ideas on the present day. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged not only to analyze but also interpret these ideas in a respectful yet critical manner.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 PHIL 108

Philosophy of Society and Law

An introduction to the philosophy of society and law in Canada and around the world. In this exploration of the relation between society and the law, the first half of the course begins with an historic survey of the debates over the meaning of the law from antiquity to the present. The second half of the course reviews legal cases which have provoked, or are still provoking, debates over the meaning of law and society.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 PHIL 109

Critical Thinking: Informal Logic

An introduction to critical thinking/writing and informal logic in practical settings. This course examines the value of rational thinking in the face of everyday challenges, e.g., problem solving, making informed decisions, and evaluating whether a statement is true. Students dissect examples of good and poor reasoning, analyze informal fallacies, detect hidden assumptions and irrelevant premises in arguments, determine where an argument's burden of proof lies, and practice transferring critical thinking skills to their writing skills. Socratic method and Socratic dialogue is employed as a tool to assist students with their inquiry-based learning.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 PHIL 111

History of Western Philosophy

A survey of the teachings of the great philosophers of the West, from the discovery of physics by the Pre-Socratics, to the culmination of medieval Scholasticism (i.e. in John of St. Thomas), with a special emphasis upon developments in the philosophy of religion.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre
2021-2022 PHIL 203

Ancient Greek Wisdom

An examination of key contributions to Greek philosophy, especially the writings of Plato and Aristotle. In the process of dialoguing about these ideas, we shall also study the importance of ancient Greek philosophy in the history of thought as well as the original intent of the philosophers in question with attention to their historic context. We shall also assess the enduring relevance of ancient Greek philosophy to the modern age.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 PHIL 210

Contemporary Ethical Issues

Through readings and class-discussion, this course introduces students to the foundational moral frameworks of western civilization and requires them to bring these frameworks to bear on some of the most important ethical issues arising in contemporary society: consumerism, technoculture, environmental ethics, responsibility to distant peoples, genetic engineering and cloning, and the promise and peril of nanotechnology.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Second year standing or instructor's consent.
2021-2022 PHIL 220

Philosophy of Sex and Gender

This course explores questions such as: What is feminism? What are the main schools of feminist thought? What is patriarchy? What is gender and does it differ from sex? Are there only two sexes? Are there only two genders? What is homosexuality? What are the different views on how same-sex attraction arises? Do feminism and Christianity have convergent trajectories? Is there a place in the church for those from the LGBTQ community? What are the cultural forces that format the thinking about these questions?

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Second year standing.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair
2021-2022 PHIL 231

Enviromental Philosophy

An overview of the various perspectives put forward in the West on the proper human relationship to the environment. We will investigate the metaphysics behind the fact/value dichotomy, the currently influential views on the human nature relationship, various environmental ethical frameworks, the distinctive characteristics of moral reasoning and argumentation as they bear on the human nature relationship, and the religious, economic, socio cultural, and ideological factors contributory to the rise of the ecological crisis. We conclude by critically interrogating the conceptual substructures of some popular contemporary environmental frameworks.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
Cross-listed: GENV 231
2021-2022 PHIL 303

Medieval Philosophy CP

This course explores philosophical issues in the West from the second to the 14th century, in particular the impact of Greek philosophy on the development of Christian thought. There are three natural stages of this interaction: 1) Defensive philosophy (apologetics): responses to rational objections brought to bear against Christianity; 2) Methodology: reflection on the interaction between faith and reason, and, in particular, the nature of theology as a science; and 3) Constructive philosophy: struggles from within over a systematic metaphysics and ethics. A central theme of the course is the role of the doctrine of creation in the image of God.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem, hrs. of philosophy.
NB: May not be offered every year. Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.
2021-2022 PHIL 304

Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas

This course studies key texts from Thomas Aquinas. The focus is on the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, but special attention is paid to his commentaries on Aristotle and on his Christian interpretation of ancient philosophy. The challenge that modern science and modern philosophy presents to Thomistic metaphysics is also discussed, with special attention paid to the highly influential critique made by Immanuel Kant.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy.
NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.
2021-2022 PHIL 305

Philosopy of the Human Person

This course addresses what it means to say that human beings are persons having freedom and subjectivity; examines the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving; studies the difference between body and soul, as well as the unity of the two in humans; and explores the question of the immortality of the soul. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

Course Credits: 3
NB: Course taught at Catholic Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre.
2021-2022 PHIL 310

Issues in Social Justice

An examination of ethical issues that pertain to social justice, addressing such topics as the distribution of wealth, affirmative action and quotas, sexual equality, gay rights, the morality of war, punishment, and responsibility.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy or political studies or third year standing.
Cross-listed: POLS 310; PHIL 510
2021-2022 PHIL 313

British Empiricism

A study of British empiricism in the 17th and 18th centuries. Selected writings of Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume are read and discussed.

Course Credits: 3
NB: Not offered every year See department chair
2021-2022 PHIL 314

Reason and the Enlightenment

A study of rationalist philosophy in the European Enlightenment period of the 17th and 18th centuries. Selected writings of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz are analysed and interpreted. As we discuss each author's ideas, we will evaluate their positions on: the limits of reason, the intelligibility of revelatory truth, the existence of God, the divisibility of reality, the role of nature, and the ethics and politics of human life. In the process of dialoguing about these ideas, we shall also study the historical importance of the Enlightenment in modernity as well as the original intent of the philosophers in question with attention to their historic context. We shall also assess the enduring relevance of the Enlightenment to the modern age.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of philosophy.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair
2021-2022 PHIL 315

Kant

A study of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, focusing primarily on Kant's seminal work, Critique of Pure Reason.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 9 sem. hrs. of philosophy.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair
2021-2022 PHIL 320

Social and Political Philosophy

An examination of foundational ideas and problems in political life and thought. Both classical and contemporary texts are used. Concepts to be treated include the state, society, the citizen, democracy, liberty, equality, authority, obligation, and disobedience.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy or political studies or third year standing
Cross-listed: POLS 320
2021-2022 PHIL 333

Philosophy and Literature

This course surveys major ancient, medieval, modern, and postmodern approaches that attempt a theory of literature. The course places modern and postmodern theories in historical perspective by reading key ancient and medieval authors. In particular, resources from the Latin Scholastic tradition most relevant to contemporary debates about literary theory are highlighted.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy.
NB: Not offered every year
2021-2022 PHIL 340

Moral Philosophy

The problem of determining standards of right and wrong as well as the problem of determining what is of value in itself. The moral theories of prominent philosophers, both ancient and modern, are examined.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy (PHIL 106 or 210 are recommended)
NB: Not offered every year See department chair