Year Course ID Course
2021-2022 HIST 107

World History to 1750: Ancient to Early Modern

This course involves a general examination of primary themes in the history of the world's major civilizations from antiquity to the 18th Century. Although European realities will be examined, the focus of this course will be global in nature with an emphasis on systems of cultural and economic exchange and on the global nature of historical development. As a part of this process students are provided with the opportunity to use the historical method, including primary sources, to understand and write accounts of the past.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)
2021-2022 HIST 108

World History from 1750 to 1945: Early Modern to Contemporary

This course involves a general examination of primary themes in the history of the world's major civilizations from 1750 to decolonization. Although the continued growth of European influence will be examined, the primary focus of this course will be global in nature focusing on systems of cultural and economic exchange, as well as an investigation of non-European societies on their own terms, including their responses to the colonial experience and the factors which influenced the nature of post-colonial development. As a part of this process students are provided with the opportunity to use the historical method, including primary sources, to understand and write accounts of the past.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)
2021-2022 HIST 109

World History Since 1945

An overview of the world's major civilizations since the last year of World War II, a period of profound 226 global transformation marked by the Cold War, the escalation of intra-state conflicts in the wake of the Cold War, and evolving ideas of human security.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 HIST 111

History of Western Civilization

An exploration of the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from its beginnings in the ancient Near East to the birth of the modern era in the Renaissance and Reformation. Key themes that will be investigated include: the emergence of the first civilizations; the development of citizenship and philosophy; the growth and transformation of Christianity; the emergence of Islam; changes in gender roles and the family. As part of this exploration, students will use historical methods, with a focus on reading primary sources, to understand and describe the past.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0;or 3-0)
2021-2022 HIST 112

History of Western Civilization

An exploration of the main events, individuals, and ideas in the history of Western society, from the mid-17th century to the mid-20th century. Key topics investigated include: the rise of absolutism; the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; the Industrial and French Revolutions; the development of new political ideologies, including liberalism, nationalism and socialism; changes in gender roles and the family; colonialism and imperialism; the origins and consequences of both World Wars, fascism, communism, and the Cold War. As part of this exploration, students will use historical methods, with a focus on reading primary sources, to understand and describe the past.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (3-0;or 3-0)
2021-2022 HIST 135

Globalization, Co-Existence, and Identity

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PreConfederation Canada; explores alternative forms of understanding Canada's past and the possibility of a history of relation; dialogues with indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing; reimagines Canada's past in the formation of identity and nationalism, colony and empire, and co-existence and partnership in local, national and global contexts. Considers how representations of Canada's past continue to shape relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, and Canada and the globe.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None. (2-1; 2-1)
2021-2022 HIST 136

All My Relations: Canada and the World after 1867

Examines the construction of past events that make up the body of knowledge known as PostConfederation Canada; explores alternative narratives from those of progressive nationalism and identity politics as informed by race, class, gender, ethnicity, and environmentalism and encourages a history of relation; dialogues with Indigenous and newcomer ways of knowing. Considers how Canada's past shaped (and continues to inform) relations between indigenous nations and settler society, Quebec and Canada, charter members and minorities, patriarchy and women, society and the environment, and Canada and the globe.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 HIST 230

History of Nursing

This course examines the development of Canadian nursing over the past four centuries, with an emphasis on the 20th century. Based on an understanding of nursing as rooted in a Christian ethos of caring for strangers, this course critically explores the ways in which religion, politics, gender, race, economics, technology, culture, war, and epidemics have influenced the development of nursing both nationally and globally.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None (3-0; 3-0)
Cross-listed: NURS 230
2021-2022 HIST 237

Genocide, Reconciliation and Co-existence: Indigenous Nationhood and Canada

The history of First Nations, Métis Nations and Inuit Nations in Canada from time immemorial through to the present from various perspectives gained from interactions with Indigenous authors and guest speakers and cultural experiences such as immersion trips to Indigenous territories. Engage broad economic, social and political themes associated with Canada's settler society and gain cultural intelligence by analyzing from an Indigenous perspective how standard narratives of progress shaped early encounters, the fur trade economy, governmental policy, Christianity and culture, residential schools, land reserves and selfgovernment. Considers the ways in which Indigenous nations utilized and reshaped Canada's historical narrative to resist assimilation, paternalism, "civilization"ť, marginalisation, and integration. Examines arguments for partnership, cooperation, negotiation and reconciliation in a movement towards peaceful co-existence.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): None.
2021-2022 HIST 302

Greece and Rome: Leadership in the Ancient World RP

A study of the most influential leadership in ancient Greece and Rome. Plutarch's biographical studies are the main focus. Various accounts of Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristotle, Xenophon, Livy, Sallust, Tacitus, and Suetonius are used as supplementary material.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 107 or HIST 111, or instructor's consent.
NB: Course taught at Redeemer Pacific College, an approved TWU learning centre
2021-2022 HIST 304

Late Medieval Europe

An inquiry into a period of Europe's past in which beliefs, attitudes, and institutions, moulded in the previous centuries, were consolidated into shapes that mark modern European (and North American) culture. The outlines of the modern state and of the modern family. An examination of late medieval civilization for indications of decline and rebirth. Signs of struggle between forces of tradition and of innovation, idealism and material or corporeal realities, and gender relations.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history including HIST 107 or HIST 111, or instructor's consent.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair.
2021-2022 HIST 306

History of Economic Thought

An investigation of the overlap of economic history and economic thought all the way from ancient Greeks philosophers, through medieval scholastics, to mercantilist businessmen, to Adam Smith and the classical economists of the Industrial Revolution, to macroeconomists emerging from the Great Depression, and into the Twenty-First century. Students examine the main economic questions and themes of these various periods including: What is the good life? Is business moral? How do selfish individuals promote societal good through markets? What is the proper role and scope of government? As an inquiry-based course, students will have considerable latitude to examine topics of particular interest to them in more detail.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history including HIST 111 or 112.
NB: May not be offered every year.
Cross-listed: ECON 306
2021-2022 HIST 307

Renaissance Europe

An examination of the social, intellectual, artistic, political, and economic transformations that gave rise to, and followed in, the wake of the "rebirth"ť of ancient Greek and Roman culture that began in Italy in the mid-14th century and spread to the rest of Europe for the next 200 years.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history including HIST 107 or HIST 111, or instructor's consent.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair.
2021-2022 HIST 308

Reformation Europe

An examination of the social, intellectual, artistic, and political history of Western Europe from the 14th to the 17th century, with a special emphasis on changes in theology and devotional practices, and the ensuing wars of religion, as the Protestant and Catholic Reformations spread throughout Europe.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sm. hrs. of history including one of HIST 107, 111, 112, or instructor's consent (3-0)
NB: Not offered every year See department chair.
Cross-listed: RELS 368
2021-2022 HIST 309

The Age of Enlightenment

An examination of the main events, individuals, and ideas in European history from 1600 to 1789. Key topics include: the growth of absolutism, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment; the development of new political and economic theories; artistic and cultural movements; the rise of the public sphere; religious revivals; and changes in marriage, the family and gender roles.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history including one of HIST 107, 111, or 112, or instructor's consent.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair.
2021-2022 HIST 310

History in Practice

An exploration of the various manifestations of the practice of history in the public sphere. Students will be exposed to the ways in which communities, regions, nations, and others polities collect, manage, create, present and understand their histories, pasts, and stories. Analyze how forms of historical consciousness show themselves in archives and museums, films and theatrical productions, monuments and memorials, anniversaries and celebrations, government policies and sporting achievements, genealogy and national origin stories, etc. Practical application of historical skills and tools through communication with public historians, visits to local historic sites, completing relevant assignments and engaging experiential learning. Students will gain valuable experiences and knowledge related to a variety of areas where public history is practiced and will be exposed to career opportunities in history. This course is a prerequisite for other History Practicum opportunities

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history. (3-0 or 3- 0)
NB: This course is the prerequisite for any history practicum (HIST 315). Not offered every year See department chair
2021-2022 HIST 312

Science and Technology in Global Perspective

This course provides a survey of the history of science and technology from the ancient world to the present with particular emphasis on the early- modern and modern eras. While much of the focus is on developments in the Western world, this course also examines select issues and events in a comparative world perspective.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history or third year standing in the natural and applied sciences.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair
Cross-listed: GENV 314
2021-2022 HIST 315

History Practicum

A supervised field experience designed to give students an opportunity to apply the skills and methodology of the discipline of history in a variety of settings so as to expose them to the broad range of contemporary applications for their formal education. Placements may take place in a variety of public settings including but not limited to: areas such as businesses and industry, government and public service, non-governmental organizations and international agencies, information management and preservation, resource management and land use, and education and training.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Completion of HIST 310 with a minimum grade of a C+. Students may include a maximum of 6 sem. hrs. in their history major, a maximum of 3 sem. hrs. of practicum in their concentration or minor, and a maximum of 9 sem. hrs. in their degree.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair. Pass/fail course.
2021-2022 HIST 316

History Practicum

A supervised field experience designed to give students an opportunity to apply the skills and methodology of the discipline of history in a variety of settings so as to expose them to the broad range of contemporary applications for their formal education. Placements may take place in a variety of public settings including but not limited to: areas such as businesses and industry, government and public service, non-governmental organizations and international agencies, information management and preservation, resource management and land use, and education and training.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): Completion of HIST 310 with a minimum grade of a C+. Students may include a maximum of 6 sem. hrs. in their history major, a maximum of 3 sem. hrs. of practicum in their concentration or minor, and a maximum of 9 sem. hrs. in their degree.
NB: Not offered every year See department chair. Pass/fail course.
2021-2022 HIST 321

Tudor-Stuart England

An exploration of the history of England from the coming of the Tudors in the 15th century to the so called Glorious Revolution at the end of the 17th century. This was an eventful age, featuring the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the creativity of William Shakespeare, a bitterly fought civil war, and the development of a limited monarchy. Particular attention is paid to two developments that transformed English life: the religious reformations of the 16th century, and the civil war and political revolutions of the 17th century.

Course Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of history, including one of HIST 107, 111, 112 or permission of instructor. (3-0; 3-0)