Assistant Professor of Psychology
Office
Stanley Nelson Centre Upper

Department(s) or Program(s)

Biography

Jaime Palmer-Hague is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Trinity Western University. Her academic research involves the influences of steroid hormones on personality, social behavior, cognition, and sex ratio in human populations.

Dr. Palmer-Hague’s most recent research investigates the role of testosterone in the modulation of the human sex ratio, and how this might involve differences in personality, mating behaviour, and cognition in men and women. She is also working on projects related to the physiological foundations of other social behaviour, such as aggression, in women.

Dr. Palmer-Hague has also done work related to the cognitive effects of endocrine manipulation drugs used to treat reproductive cancers. One of her current projects involves the influence of LHRH agonists/antagonists used to treat prostate cancer on social-cognitive behaviour in men. In the past, she has also looked at how Tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen used to treat breast cancer, effects cognitive abilities in women.

Research & Scholarship

Education

Ph.D., Cognitive and Biological Psychology, Simon Fraser University, 2015

M.Sc., Human Development and Learning, University of Calgary, 2006

B.A. (Hons.), Biology and Psychology, Carleton University, 2004

Recent Publications

Palmer-Hague, J. L., Zilioli, S., Jagore, J., & Delecce, T. (under review). Body mass index, not facial width-to-height ratio, signals formidability in female UFC fighters. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology.

 

Palmer-Hague, J. L., & Watson, N. V. (under review). Effects of mother and father dominance on offspring sex in contemporary humans. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology.

Palmer-Hague, J. L., & Watson, N. V. (under review). Predicted offspring sex is related to women’s preferences for dominance in men. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences.

Palmer-Hague, J. L., Zillioli, S., & Watson, N. V. (2013). Predictions for sex of first-born child reflect masculine and feminine characteristics in men and women. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 833-844.

Palmer, J.L., Trotter, T., Joy, A.A., & Carlson, L.E. (2008). Cognitive effects of Tamoxifen in pre-menopausal women with breast cancer compared to healthy controls. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2(4), 275-282. 

Courses Taught

PSYC 105 - Introduction to Psychology I

PSYC 326 – Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 354 – Brain and Behaviour

PSYC 309 – Sensation and Perception

PSYC 390 – Special Topics (Motivation and Emotion)