Canada Research Chair in Patient-Reported Outcomes

Trinity Western University
Tier 2 - April 1, 2013
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

People with chronic and life-limiting illnesses often struggle with complex healthcare needs and concerns related to their symptoms, daily functioning, the impacts of advancing illness on their quality of life, and end-of-life considerations. Routine and comprehensive assessments of individuals’ perspectives of their health and quality of life are required to ensure that their concerns and health care needs can be addressed in the care provided.

This Canada Research Chair program of research focuses on the utilization of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to effectively and efficiently assess people’s health and quality of life concerns. PROMs involve the use of questionnaires (delivered in paper form, online, or via a handheld device) by which people report on important aspects of their illness experiences, including their symptoms, daily functioning, and psychological, social, and spiritual or existential wellbeing. The research includes studies regarding (a) the development and evaluation of PROM instruments, (b) the use of systems, and approaches, including electronic (online and tablet-based) technologies, to inform hospital- and community-based care for people with chronic life-limiting illnesses.

 The use of PROMs enables people to provide important information about their illness experiences and concerns in a way that is readily accessible to health care professionals and service providers. By facilitating the routine integration of PROMs in health care, the research by Sawatzky and his team will inform the day-to-day care provided by health care professionals and the ongoing evaluation of healthcare services, with the ultimate goal of improving health outcomes and reducing suffering of people with chronic life-limiting illnesses.

For Dr. Richard Sawatzky's complete Canada Research Chair Profile, click here.

Nursing Scholarship Newsletter, article about CRC lecture